Oh the shame.

Moe Hunter Posted By Moe Hunter, Mar 12, 2013 at 8:54 PM

  1. Moe Hunter

    Moe Hunter
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 6, 2013
    28
    29
    Loving all the advice gents.

    I have restacked most of the wood by now and have paid much closer attention to the ends as well as making sure the splits are relatively level. I've used some shims to achieve this and I have reduced the height of the stacks. I think that a large part of the failure was due to thawing soggy ground.

    They say that ash has a relatively lowers moisture than most other woods. Is stacking in rows of three for 8 monthes going to work for seasoning? Or should I go with single rows?
     
  2. pen

    pen
    There are some who call me...mod. 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Aug 2, 2007
    7,758
    1,527
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna

    Split the difference, go with rows of two.

    pen
     
  3. billb3

    billb3
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 14, 2007
    4,370
    614
    Loc:
    SE Mass

    Those have been outlawed here.
    The deer seek them out to play King of the Heapenhausen on.
    Their horseplay often leaves them lame.
     
    Woody Stover and Jags like this.
  4. Slow1

    Slow1
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 26, 2008
    2,671
    286
    Loc:
    Eastern MA

    Agreed - two rows against each other (in my experience) greatly increases the stability while still leaving one end of each split open to air. I did a three row stack early in my burning days and found the middle row was significantly more wet after 18 months than the outer rows.

    And at the risk of opening up another debate, I also advise top-covering the doublerow stack. Not only does keeping the top covered reduce teh amount of rain that can fall between the stacks, it will also reduce the amount of leaves etc that blow on top and work their way down to mulch in the stack. I have found that a piece of heavy tarp cut to fit and stapled all the way around (stapled to the top splits) does a good job of keeping rain out while not tearing itself to pieces in wind as it is very well secured (just about every split at the top is stapled to the tarp). I have one that has survived the last year through several 50+mpg wind events and you can't tell the difference.
     
  5. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,011
    2,260
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Cut it out, Dennis. You're making me feel like giving up and going with the Jags method. Take those pics down and put up the one of your stack crash...the only one you've had in fifty-odd years. ==c

    Stack crash of epic proportions. Violated the cardinal rule; The base must be stable. Those were half-posts on concrete blocks, and the weight of the wood flexed them.
    [​IMG]
     
    ScotO likes this.
  6. Moe Hunter

    Moe Hunter
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 6, 2013
    28
    29
    Re stacked all my wood bark down today. Here's hoping.


    Ps.

    Joke.
     
    Shane N likes this.
  7. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,011
    2,260
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    No, that applies to U.S. wood only. In the Great White North it must be bark up. The faster you restack, the less damage will be done.
     
    Shane N likes this.
  8. westkywood

    westkywood
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 14, 2009
    418
    110
    Loc:
    Kentucky
    I know this isnt the case here, but as wood dries the stacks shift. I go around with a split and tap the wood back in place where it has shifted from the drying process. I do this 3 or 4 times a year.
    I did have a stack fall from the base sinking in mud like the OP said...
     
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 14, 2007
    27,815
    7,368
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Single rows Moe. If I planned on burning the wood next fall, for sure it would be in single rows with lots of space between the rows. Also make sure it is in a windy spot.

    Ash does start out with a lower moisture content but it still has to let that moisture out.
     
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 14, 2007
    27,815
    7,368
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Here it is Woody. The only one I've had tip over.


    Bad pile-1.JPG
     
    gyrfalcon and ScotO like this.
  11. ScotO

    ScotO
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    I remembered when this happened......it was a sad, sad day.
     
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  12. Jags

    Jags
    Moderate Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    17,432
    6,043
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    .....And that was in the spring of '52. ;lol
     
    Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  13. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,011
    2,260
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    ;lol For me it was, but I posted in hopes that everyone else would be entertained. ==c
    Yep, that Spring was a crazy one; So many thaws and freezes. Sometimes, no matter how expertly the wood is stacked, Mother Nature throws you a curve ball. ==c
     
  14. Moe Hunter

    Moe Hunter
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 6, 2013
    28
    29
    My grandpa use to talk about that one.
     
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  15. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2007
    1,837
    201
    Loc:
    Champlain Valley, Vermont
    I feel your pain. My property is on the side of a ridge, so sloped all the way, and really windy. I tried for several years, and finally have given up and buy mostly kiln-dried stuff. I can rebuild a fallen stack once in a while, just part of the game, but mine -- all of them at one time or another -- would keel over (frontwards or backwards) every month or so during the spring/summer/fall. The periodic screaming was bothering the next-door neighbors... a quarter mile down the road.
     
  16. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 16, 2012
    752
    192
    Loc:
    Meadow Valley, CA
    +1
    Google about the Norwegian feud about bark up v bark down stacking.....funny stuff
     
  17. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,011
    2,260
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Some folks here rig up some pretty inventive systems for automatically controlling combustion air to their stove; Maybe they could come up with a self-leveling stack base. ==c
     
  18. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 29, 2012
    2,537
    1,079
    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    is your first row of rounds started on snow packed ice possibly?
     

Share This Page