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Old Kero to wood possible?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Yanniwithamohawk, May 31, 2013.

  1. Yanniwithamohawk

    Yanniwithamohawk New Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Maine
    I naively thought I was making out like a bandit when I bought a stove for $50 that the guy told me was a wood-stove that was converted to gas. Oh how wrong I was. I'll be the first to admit that I know little/nothing about wood-stoves, especially antique ones. Turns out this one is an early 1900's (not sure of the exact date) Columbian Kerosene stove. It's a beautiful appliance but in addition to my serious doubts of it's operation in it's current state, my partner and I had really been hoping for a wood-stove. Is it at all possible to convert this ol' bird to wood or am I dreaming? At very least what are the chances of salvaging it to be used with Kero? It seems to be in pretty good condition, no rust really and all moving parts still move. Help please.

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  2. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

    Joined:
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    4,067
    Loc:
    southern Indiana
    You are dreaming my friend. You will not be able to convert it.
    ScotO likes this.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,640
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Agreed. Lots of issues. Not designed to contain the heat of a wood fire. I doubt that any inspector would allow for it. Insurance is gonna scream. Just too much that ain't "right".

    Have you priced Kero? Might as well kick up your furnace.
    ScotO likes this.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome to hearth.com. I would call the guy and see if he will take it back. Then, drop back here and tell us more about your goals and house so that we can get you set up with wood heat safely.

    PS: If you haven't already accrued a good stash of firewood, yesterday would have been a good time to start. Firewood needs to dry out, even wood that is sold as "seasoned".
    ScotO likes this.
  5. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,889
    Loc:
    SW Washington
    Oh well, $50 is not a huge mistake. Maybe you could even sell it as an antique decoration if it looks cool.

    Anyway, you are in the right place to learn how to do this right. Some questions you will be asked are:

    Do you want a stove for primary heating or for just occasional/ambiance?

    What style and size house?

    What is your climate like?

    What is your budget?
  6. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,584
    Loc:
    South Shore, MA
    Yam, thanks for your visit to the forums. And now that your already down $50 consider yourself lucky that you didn't spring on something that was a lot more. I'm not sure what attracted you to that old bird but you may want to hang around here a little more often before you spend anymore money.
    ScotO likes this.
  7. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Welcome to the forums, Mohawk. One of my motto is "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is".......
    I'm sure you could resell the stove as a decoration to someone out there....put it up on craigslist and see what happens.
    Look at it this way, you're only in it 50 clams. I know of a LOT of people that have been burned way worse than that (no pun intended).
    If you are honestly looking to heat with wood, you NEED to get a more modern appliance, for several reasons. One reason is safety. These modern made stoves are made to be safe. And these modern stoves can put out some amazingly efficient heat. Another thing is your homeowner's insurance. You put an antique stove like that in your house, and in the even of a fire or something, your insurance is going to probably drop you like a bad habit.....they look for and EXPECT your stove to have a UL listing or Warnock Kersey certification. And they expect it to be installed to both the manufactures instructions AND your local codes...

    So make sure you don't short-change yourself, its going to cost some money to get up and running with a safe, efficient set--up

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