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Older Tirolia stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by dryville, Dec 8, 2010.

  1. dryville

    dryville New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Is anyone familiar with Tirolia cookstoves that were imported from Austria in the 1980's?

    I'm considering buying one, but it needs a few parts, and my queries to former local dealers, and stove parts dealers in the UK have turned up nothing.

    These are boiler stoves, with a full cast iron jacket/firebox combination. The one I'm considering has never been fired, but is missing it's water temp control, which is an immersion-bulb thing that controls the air flap, similar to a Sampson draft control, but different.

    I'd be grateful if anyone out there knows more about these, and specifically, some details about the missing control device, and whether it can found, made, or adapted from another part.

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  2. nosaudioil

    nosaudioil Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Messages:
    131
    Loc:
    coastal ME
    Contact Albie Barden of Maine Wood Heat Co. ( www.mainewoodheat.com ) The Guru of masonary stoves.
    He sold the Tirolia stoves in the late 1970's to early 80's.
    Bought one from Albie and used as it as hydronic heat/hot water & cooking in an old farmhouse. It worked great! Wood in the fall and coal in the colder parts of winter. Later in 1990 bought another used one (not from Barden), but that's another tale.
    Talk to Albie regarding the Tirolia, he knows everything.
  3. dryville

    dryville New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Thank you very much!
  4. dryville

    dryville New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    I did talk to Mr. Barden - he was very helpful but does not have a source for the temperature controls.

    So, if anyone out there knows about these, I'd still appreciate a tip.

    Albie described it as an immersion-bulb device with a rod that moves in and out based on the boiler temp. The end of the rod controls the position of the draft door. He said it looks kind of like a CO2 cartridge.

    It seems there must be similar if not identical devices on the many self-regulating European boiler stoves available in the UK and Europe, but I haven't had any luck in my communications with a few UK stove dealers.
  5. Maninthewild

    Maninthewild New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Isle of Man
    I ran a Tirolia Casanova model for about 8 years from 94 to 02 and it was a wonderful beast - bought it of a mate who had it in store for years for £150 and it saved a fortune. Could never understand why they were not more popular, or why they stopped producing them. Kicked out 55,000 btu - enough to run central heating for a three bedroom house easily, full width cooking top and temperature controlled oven. Fire box had a wind-up / down grate to allow it increase / decrease capacity for winter / summer use.

    The oven thermostat control was a simple copper thermostatic vial sitting in a recess in the side of the oven chamber, with a pressure pipe leading to a flap on the firebox air vent via the temperature control dial. Principle was simple - when the oven reached the required temperature the flap closed damping down the firebox. However, it was never very accurate and there was understandably a lag in the fire (and subsequent temperature change) reaction. We quickly learnt to leave the temperature control fully open and instead controlled the oven temperature by varying the pull-knob on the right hand side which diverts hot air either direct to the chimney over the top of the oven, or down and round the oven box. If you take the hot plates off the top you can see the very simple layout and control system. Big plus of this was that when the thermostat vial pipe eventually broke (which is almost inevitable with these stoves due to the exposed position of the pipe near the firebox door) it made no difference to us.
    Like an Aga, you have to learn to cook at lower temperatures and for longer periods, but thats no hardship. Even back in 98 when our thermostat went I was unable to source a replacement

    Some other points and tips.
    Full width cooking surface is great for capacity (we could get 4 saucepans and a big griddle on the top) BUT it loses heat quickly if both covers are open - you have to compensate for this by stoking the fire well at start. Hot plates vary in temperature - immediately over the firebox (right hand side on ours) is hottest, with far left near side corner coolest.
    Oven capacity is reasonable but not huge. The door is easily detached for cleaning and access
    Clean the interior of soot FREQUENTLY - its amazing how the soot builds up and affects the cooking temperature. I did ours every 6 weeks in the winter when it was getting daily heavy use. Great thing about the stove is that cleaning is easy - just lift off the hot plates for full access to the top, and unscrew the two knobs and take off the bottom cleaning hatch - shove the long rigid pipe of a vacuum cleaner into every corner and 5 minutes later all done !
    Burns both wood and coal - fire box is not huge so needs regular checking if you are cooking in the autumn winter and have it on summer firebox setting.
    I burnt only wood and used to be able to load the firebox last thing at night, leave the vent juct slightly open and the fire would stay in all night ticking over (with good quality wood) - come down in the morning, toss two dry logs on, open the vent and away it would go.
    I plumbed it in to the house myself - ran the water heating pipes vertically straight from the back of the stove up to bedroom above and then to immersion tank in second bedroom, with the central heating system pump at ground level diverting off . Advantage of this was that the immersion was alway hot as it acts as the main heat-sink (it was an open sytem with big header tank so plenty of expansion capacity - you need this as the stove can get hot enough to boil the water in the pipes if the pump is not running) PLUS by good fortune the upstairs radiator circuit would run at a low level purely by convection. This meant that we hardly ever had to run the pump as the kitchen and all the upstairs radiators would self circulate.

    If the one you are looking at is a Casanova model you can get a copy of the installation and operation manual on-line now at http://www.oilstoves.co.uk/webdocs/...tion_&_user_instructions_Tirolia_Casanova.pdf

    Any other queeries then I'd be happy to help out if I can.

    Maninthewild
  6. niceday

    niceday New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Australia
    Hi
    Has been a while since this forum was used but we have just purchased a 2nd hand good condition Tirolia Cassanova ZH. We want to use it for heating hot water and as a stove. It also has provision for heating radiators. We are not connecting the radiators closing the valves question is do we need special parts from Tirolia for the hot water as we have just got the stove?
    Many thanks for any help.
    Have a nice day!
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    48,096
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA

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