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Olympic ForeverFlex liners

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rmcfall, Aug 22, 2006.

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  1. rmcfall

    rmcfall Feeling the Heat

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    They are pretty well known, but quite thin in construction. I think they offer a slightly thicker model, and maybe even a heavy one.

    .05, just for comparison, is 1/5 the thickness of 24 gauge rigid liner. It's about like Broil Foil. Does not leave a lot of room for corrosion.

    Despite all the slogans and nice names, the truth is that these very thin liners have not been in the field for decades, so no one knows how they will hold up...the warranties mean little since the labor and installation are not covered, and that is where a lot of the cost is.

    The prices can't be beat, though.....and that is probably why they are so popular.
  3. rmcfall

    rmcfall Feeling the Heat

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    Wow, that isn't very thick at all. When a pipe like this is installed inside a chimney, how does one know when corrosion has occurred all the way through the liner? Without pulling the liner out, it seems like one might never know...


  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I wonder about the long term durability of flex liners myself. But I praise the day they came along because of having a way to get a liner in my masonry chimney. For years I wrestled with how I could get something down that chimney to cut down the flue size. Danced around up there with black pipe and the whole bit. I never for a minute thought direct connects were worth the effort it would take to haul them to the landfill. Until I bought the little Jotuls last year I didn't have a clue that liners had been invented, or that EPA stoves existed for that matter.

    Every year just cut the wood, burn the wood and drag that 500 beast out of the fireplace to clean the chimney every year that a chimney fire didn't do it. Wanna know what that does to your back and the bricks on the hearth?

    After finding the hearth.com forum I went liner hunting. They may be thin but if they last five years they beat the heck out of the alternative, nothing in that chimney but aging clay tiles and creosote. And installing another one is less effort than hauling the stove out five times. Hopefully that God awful to install double wall jobbie lasts longer than that but if it doesn't it still will be a blessing.
  5. rmcfall

    rmcfall Feeling the Heat

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    Wow. I didn't realize these liners would be so thin. Broil foil? What keeps these things from getting crushed in the truck? I've got about 6 feet of liner left over from my previous install, but it is pretty beefy.

    Would there be any problem using the 6 feet I liner I already have and connecting it to rigid pipe? Or connecting it to a more heavy-duty flex liner?
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Stainless is pretty tough stuff, so even thin stainless... especially ribbed like a liner, will hold up to mechanical abuse.

    Yes, flex is often used to connect to rigid. The main thing is to use proper adapters so that all water and creosote flow down inside the pipe, without leaking out!
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