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OSBURN 2200 i , Carbon Monoxide issues

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by edmtgs, Jan 2, 2007.

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  1. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    hahaha , the installer defended his drywall screw install and loose half a$$ set up. I'd a loved to hear that one.

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  2. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    I'm sure Elk is right on the money with his calculations and advice. I would address that right away.

    I would also like to know how the installer sealed the liner to the insert. Did he use RTV or furnace cement, gasket material, insulation, etc... It sounds like whatever he did made a difference for a while, which leads me to believe that he used a material like RTV, which has since slumped or bruned away. Can you check that out and let us know. Also, post a picture of the connection after his repair if you can.
  3. edmtgs

    edmtgs New Member

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    He used Furnace cement. I had the stove running all day today no problems with CO. Went out got home no CO issues( detector reads in realtime and records highest spike)
    So I decide to start a fire( 18 degrees outside),
    glowing embers in the box I start I fire with kindling and put in a few logs, low and behold CO spikes to 219 ppmm. I have been leaving the door to the utility room open and had two windows cracked open and still can smell like gases are coming into my home. I figured the liner is cold so let me put more wood in and get it warmed up,no success with two windows wide open down stairs and the door to the utility room wide open my insert is pumping CO into my home like its nobody's business.

    I think I need to maybe insulate the liner and call in an expert( not the installers, Im done with them). But you figure with the two windows wide open I would have enough combustion air . I am at my wits end .
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    What the heck is Osburn doing? Weird emissions causing gunk all over, high CO readings, crack in the welds. These stoves seem to have earned themselves the black creosote award this year.
  5. edmtgs

    edmtgs New Member

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    SO your telling there are alot of people out there with the issues I m have with my osburn? Can you please post the links to other people have issues with this stove
  6. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

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    Can you pull off the surround and check the connection again, post some photos too?
    How long did that furnace cement cure? It was furnace cement right?
    Elk had mentioned something about that cement possibly cracking away from the pipe several posts ago.
    If you had hot coals in the firebox and the stove backdraft's it sounds like the flue is too cold, is this an exterior chimney?
    Does it have a cement crown up on top of the chimney?

    ******EDIT********
    Where are you located?
    Maybe a forum member lives nearby and can help give you some more ideas by actually seeing it...
  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    you lack air defrfeciency in the boiler room the equilvant of 5 fully opened windows of 3' 5' areas cracking then a few inches proves nothing, only point out you deffeciency is more that cracking a few wingows you need makeup combustion air to support 80,000 bts in the boiler room alone Your aslo must have negative pressure issues. The Installers all of them dropped the ball here the furnace guy the stove never should have been allowed to be installed in that basement.
  8. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Waterford, WI
    Can't seem to blame this one on the insert itself. Sounds like a combination of the environment it's installed in with a bad install contributing.

    In some ways, I'm lucky since my insert is the only 'fired' appliance in my home. This makes adequate combusion air a non-issue.
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