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OT A good weedtrimmer

Post in 'The Gear' started by johnsopi, Apr 21, 2007.

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  1. johnsopi

    johnsopi Minister of Fire

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    MD near DE&PA;
    Whats a good home owner weed trimmer. I've had both a craftman and a Roybi they are both in the trash.

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  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    How much do you use one? Gas or electric? Different attachments used like rototiller, leaf blower, edger?

    If you go through them quickly, professional quality may be the answer.

    Matt
  3. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Halifax, VA
    http://www.stihl.us/trimmers/FS100RX.html

    Used this one for two years landscaping. While I will say that I absolutely hate running a weedwacker, this one is smooth, starts easy, vibrations little and overall does a great job. I will definitely buy one when i actually have property that I will have to maintain.
  4. MustBurn

    MustBurn New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
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    I looked at the Stihl FS 90, but Please! $300 for a weedwhacker!, plus $200 for each attachment!!!!! Does anybody know anything about the Lowe's Troy-bilt 4 cycle trimmer? I was thinking of trying that one.

    MB
  5. johnsopi

    johnsopi Minister of Fire

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    MD near DE&PA;
    I'm going to use the thing 20min. a week during the summer. The less I pay the better, there no cool factor
    in weed eaters. I want one that starts easy and every time. I hate ones that won't start, pulling that cord in the 90 deg. heat. is the pitts.
  6. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I got that FS90. http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/2691/
    Interesting that the Stihl site posted above doesn't hype the 4-Mix engine....hmmm.
    I've used it some to trim the hydroaxed (?) rocky shoulder in front of my house.
    I have a blade on it, but I don't think it's agressive enough-I might try the tri blade.
    The string trimmer has not been that satisfying, but maybe it's me or the area attempted to trim-it seems to jam up.
    I also think it's somewhat low on power on high end and will get it tuned soon (this topic was a good reminder for me).
    I definately used my face screen helmet, for sure!
    It's quiet and the bike handle and shoulder sling is pretty ergonomic (a good thing, since I don't think it's that lightweight).
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    I have the Stihl FS85. Best purchase I have made. I also owned cheaper models including the Ryobi. After an hour I would be numb from the vibration and aching from working the damn thing. With the Stihl I can cut for hours and although it's still work, it's totally bearable. Get a real tool and you won't regret it.
  8. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
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    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    I have a Ryobi with the detachable attachement setup, although the trimmer is the only attachment I have for it. Purchased cheap as a "factory recon" from HF a few years ago. Mostly I use it with the brush cutter blade for trimming back the more agressive undergrowth. I have had to replace the drive shaft after it stripped out, but I've been cutting some heavy brush with it and arguably abusing it by overloading.

    The few times I've used the string trimmer I haven't been that impressed, but I don't think I've ever encountered a string trimmer that did impress me, so I couldn't say it was worse than normal...

    I have not made a formal study of it, but casual observation of the lawn services that I see when running around suggests that a lot of them also use the Ryobi as opposed to a more "pro" grade unit.

    Otherwise the unit's been pretty reliable, starts OK, and for the 3-4 tanks of gas a year I run through it, has been OK. I use it with the shoulder strap and the secondary handle - it's been reasonably comfortable.

    Gooserider
  9. computeruser

    computeruser Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    East Lansing, MI
    The straight-shaft Echo trimmers that they sell at HD are probably the best homeowner trimmers out there. Echo really has figured out how to build a good trimmer, and they've been doing it right for a long time now. Their motors are still two-stroke, which is nice - fewer parts to break, simple to work on - and with proper care they last forever.

    As for the Ryobi/Craftsman/PoulanPro/TroyBilt/Etc. trimmers, I would sooner buy a pawnshop machine from a proper manufacturer than one of those. And this isn't even so much an indictment of their quality as the fact that you can't get parts for them without ordering them, waiting, waiting, and waiting some more. At least with the major brands - Echo, Stihl, RedMax, Shindaiwa - you can take advantage of the huge network of dealers that actually have parts in stock when you need them, and that have the skill and knowledge necessary to get your equipment serviced and back in action without having to ship it off to a "service center." That sort of stuff is worth something to me.
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Not to argue, but as a data point, my neighborhood power equipment guy (close enough I DRIVE our equipment to him...) took about 3 days to get the shaft for my Ryobi - the only part I've ever needed for it... He says he does alot of Ryobi work (because there are a lot of them out there, not because they are bad...) and doesn't have noticeably more trouble getting parts for them than for any other brand. He has several parts suppliers and mostly orders parts "as needed" with that sort of turn around for most items.

    Gooserider
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