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Outdoor, but only, outdoor boiler review compare brands of OWB's, list particulars

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by sdrobertson, Nov 16, 2007.

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  1. eco-one

    eco-one Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    42
    lol sorry for yelling lol.Olaf is one nice guy he still stops in and shots the bull with us.i could find a few pics and post but it will be a few days .are you a dealer that you know olaf?

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  2. eco-one

    eco-one Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
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    difference is the new one reburns the unburnt gasses(smoke) which makes a cleaner burning stove with out lossing btu
  3. brad068

    brad068 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    440
    Loc:
    Central Wisconsin
    Well, no refractory material is sooo.. wrong. True gasifiers would not work efficiently without firebrick/ceramics. Unless you are using kryptonite infused steel, or tiles off of the space shuttle, nothing else will withstand the temps of secondary burning. The definition of refract/refraction is the bending of a ray or wave of light, heat, or sound as it passes indirectly from one medium to another of different density...

    As far as I'm concerned, any wood stove or boiler, especially a boiler without firebrick is inexcusable. Boilers need the refractory material gap to produce high temps for complete combustion of the fuel. Without this gap boilers are trying to produce a temp span of 1000*f or more in the thickness of the plate steel, 10Ga. to 3/8". Certain S.S's. do not take well to this thermal span where one side of the steel(water) its 180*F and on the air side(combustion) is 1200*F. The result, stress corrosion cracking.


    Liquid cooled engines, especially two cycle, act in this same way in the form of cold seizures. The liquid absorbs the combustion heat so well that the cylinder wall cannot expand as fast as the piston. The piston expands rapidly and soon is as large as the cylinder bore and seizes in the cylinder.
    Air cooled engines are not as susceptible to this because air cannot absorb/remove the heat as fast, and the cylinder can expand more equal to the piston. But when air cooled engines had a piston failure, more often than not the piston was melting down from excessive combustion heat that the air cooling could not get rid of.


    Many woodstoves burn more efficiently than owb. When the firebox is insulated with air, the steel can get alot hotter thus, higher temps are achieved. When insulated by water, the steel is always quenched and cannot burn off the creosote/tar that develops on alot of owb walls along with the constant cycling. A good example of this is like trying to gas axe through casing with water on the backside or soldering a joint with a little water on the inside. In fact, I think that if a person with a owb would install a buffer tank and burn the owb like a gasifier (Garn), they would see a decrease in fuel usage.

    I have some 1" ceramic blanket and did a neat experiment with it. I held a piece in my hand and burned the top side with map gas torch. I held it there for half a minute and could barely feel the heat on my hand and the top side was glowing bright orange. - refractory a must!

    As for any gasifiers that have passed EPA emissions, the E3400 from Sequoyah is one. The Garn has passed two independent testing procedures. CB is supposed to have one.
  4. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Nov 18, 2005
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    Loc:
    Central NYS
    The trade association I work for puts on the Northeastern Forest Products Equipment Expo. I'm in charge of freight handling at the show, so I get to know all the exhibitors, especially the OWB guys, because their boiler are such a PIA to move around. Usually they sell them at the show, so I usually only have to worry about getting them off the truck, not back on after the show.
  5. deerhuntrer

    deerhuntrer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Loc:
    Mountains of Maine
    I have a central boiler 6048 its my second winter using it. I live in a huge 150 year old farmhouse with oil hot air backup. I also heat a small apartment with it which is over the barn. The stove is 100 feet from the house and we burn everything we can for wood from hemlock slabs to hardwood. My only, only complaint is that we get alot of snow here and the winds whips and drifts and freezes the damper open and causes it to boil over I am suprised that Central Boiler hasnt created a breathable cover for the grill part so snow cant drift up in the damper. This has happened twice last year and twice this year. I have tried to make my own, but with limited success. Does any other Central boiler owner out there that has had experience with this? We have recieved over 50 inches of snow already this year and it tends to drift wickidly.
  6. deerhuntrer

    deerhuntrer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Loc:
    Mountains of Maine
    I have owned a CB 6048 for 2 years and love it. I did some research before and chose the CB over the others. I was also looking at Aqua Therms but because the dealer at CB was more helpful than the one at AT, we chose CB. Best of all it beats burning oil.
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