Oxygen barrier Pex or regular pex?

NCFord Posted By NCFord, Sep 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM

  1. NCFord

    NCFord
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 5, 2011
    187
    18
    Loc:
    central NC
    I went to the plumbing shop yesterday to pick up some 1 inch pex for my boiler install and they did not have any oxygen barrier pex. I have gotten some there is the past but now it is special order and $1.80 per foot vs.
    .85 cents per foot. This is for the 20' straight sticks. I only need about 120 feet so I don't care too much about the cost. What I need to know is if I should use the O2 barrier pex or is the regular stuff ok. This will be used from my pressurized primary loop. The guy at the plumbing shop said that you don't need o2 barrier pex anymore....I don't believe him otherwise they would not make o2 barrier.
     
  2. avc8130

    avc8130
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 6, 2010
    1,047
    95
    Loc:
    God's Gift to Gassification
  3. NCFord

    NCFord
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 5, 2011
    187
    18
    Loc:
    central NC
    that's what I thought.
     
  4. bmblank

    bmblank
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2013
    698
    257
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Around me o2 barrier is code. Plus, for steel boilers (nearly all of them) you'll want it. You don't want o2 barrier for domestic water, that's all.
     
  5. NCFord

    NCFord
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 5, 2011
    187
    18
    Loc:
    central NC
    I'm not using any for domestic water, but why would you not want it? I get it for boilers but regular water lines?
     
  6. bmblank

    bmblank
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2013
    698
    257
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I'm not entirely sure, to be honest. I wonder if it had something to do with the wide range and speed if pressure changes. I was just told I'm not supposed to use it.
     
  7. hiker88

    hiker88
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 3, 2011
    230
    37
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    Your DHW is not a closed system like your heating loop. Oxygen in your DHW system is purging every time you open the taps - plus I don't think there is much in your dhw system that will rust - your taps etc. are probably stainless. With your heating loop you are going to want to manually purge as much of the air out of your system after fill up, and then have the proper scavengers in place to remove any o2 that happens to get into the system over time.

    EDIT - Probably the short answer is "just to save money." Non barrier being cheaper and all.
     
  8. heaterman

    heaterman
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 16, 2007
    3,349
    618
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    Definitely use barrier tube, even for an open system. It will reduce the O2 infiltration and help keep chemical additive from deteriorating.
     
  9. NCFord

    NCFord
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 5, 2011
    187
    18
    Loc:
    central NC
    I just ordered 2 100' rolls from pex universe for $89.00 each including shipping. I hate using the rolled stuff but oh well.
     
  10. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    11,532
    1,837
    Loc:
    Cascade Foothills, WA
    I worked with 3/4" rolled pex water line this weekend. Total PITA. Always thought that sticks were stupid but that was before I had used anything bigger than 1/2".
     
  11. BoilerMan

    BoilerMan
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Apr 16, 2012
    1,717
    325
    Loc:
    Northern Maine
    FWIW, if you use PEX-a it's much easier to work with. Some of the common trade name or brands are Wirsbo/Uponor Mr.PEX. My supplier sells Uponor, I find the 3/4" to be easier to work with than 1/2" or the Lowes/HD stuff (usually PEX-C). The rolls have much less memory than the PEX-c.

    The O2 barrio stuff is the same material, but with the oxygen barrio applied to the outside of the pipe. It is not certified for potable water because it is not cleaned the same as it is for potable water use. But it is the same physical tubing.

    TS
     
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    11,532
    1,837
    Loc:
    Cascade Foothills, WA
    Is that the case for all o2 barrier tube? My mrpex o2 barrier has the nsf label and I planned to use the leftovers for potable.
     
  13. BoilerMan

    BoilerMan
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Apr 16, 2012
    1,717
    325
    Loc:
    Northern Maine
    What's the NSF rating? I also used Mr.Pex brand tubing for my slab. It is only label rfh for radiant floor heating. I did use it for a bathroom that was added this year. All of my actual drinking water is in copper.

    TS
     
  14. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    11,532
    1,837
    Loc:
    Cascade Foothills, WA

    I looked and yes you are correct, NSF-RFH on the mr. pex 02 barrier which is not the same as NSF-61 that appears on regular drinking water pex. Rats, I planned to use those scraps for plumbing projects.
     
  15. jjstillskin

    jjstillskin
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 1, 2015
    2
    0
    Loc:
    Dallas, Texas
    Hey guys im new here and I found some of this information interesting. I have found certain information that claims you may indeed used oxygen barrier pex for potable water applications... Meaning if there is some left over you don't need to go buy more. I also read that it should be cleaned a little before use if its the silane method type. What are some thoughts on this?
     
  16. BoilerMan

    BoilerMan
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Apr 16, 2012
    1,717
    325
    Loc:
    Northern Maine
    This is an old thread, and without the proper NSF-61 cert. it will not be legal. "clean it a little?" not for my kids to drink from.........

    TS
     
  17. Hearthyposter

    Hearthyposter
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2015
    11
    0
    Loc:
    New York
    LOL! Wherever you read that and whoever said that should have their licenses revoked. NSF certification is a clear distinction of potable water use, and taking the cheap way out is never an option. You should read this article on PEX pipe markings. I think it will answer all your questions. http://www.canarsee.com/pex-pipe-markings
     
  18. jjstillskin

    jjstillskin
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 1, 2015
    2
    0
    Loc:
    Dallas, Texas
    Well I found these post on heating help.com if anyone has heard of it. Im trying to install PEX into my home, i need a re-piping job done, so I am just checking out all of the parameters. I understand what your both saying now. Thank you.
     
  19. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    11,532
    1,837
    Loc:
    Cascade Foothills, WA
    If it's not labeled as safe for drinking water then you wouldn't pass your plumbing inspection and you could end up pulling it out down the road when somebody wants to buy your house and find that illegal pipe.
     
  20. Hearthyposter

    Hearthyposter
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2015
    11
    0
    Loc:
    New York
    Exactly, either way its a lose-lose situation. Your better of doing it right the first time around.
     
  21. Callaway

    Callaway
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 26, 2015
    1
    0
    Loc:
    Triangle, NC
    Most O2 barrier PEX seems to be NSF 14/61 rated, which means it is SAFE and certified for drinking water usage-- see the Home Depot stuff here: http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/ae/aec7431a-c3d5-4771-be52-603008f70c2f.pdf
    So use the oxygen barrier anywhere you'd like if your brand of pipe carries the rating. I'm thinking of retrofitting some radiant floor heating by just using a continuous loop on my tankless gas water heater, mostly as supplemental heating so I have cozy floors but also so that I am a couple backup batteries away from maintaining some decent heating when my heat pump doesn't have electricity after an ice storm or so that I can substitute the gas floor heating for those extra cold times my electric strip heat would have kicked in. I have a small house (<900 sqft). Found this thread when I had the same questions and was encouraged to google it further since there was not a consensus or definitive answer. I believe that Sharkbite spec sheet offers some clarity at least for that brand.
     

Share This Page