1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Oxygen barrier Pex or regular pex?

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by NCFord, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. NCFord

    NCFord Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    Loc:
    central NC
    I went to the plumbing shop yesterday to pick up some 1 inch pex for my boiler install and they did not have any oxygen barrier pex. I have gotten some there is the past but now it is special order and $1.80 per foot vs.
    .85 cents per foot. This is for the 20' straight sticks. I only need about 120 feet so I don't care too much about the cost. What I need to know is if I should use the O2 barrier pex or is the regular stuff ok. This will be used from my pressurized primary loop. The guy at the plumbing shop said that you don't need o2 barrier pex anymore....I don't believe him otherwise they would not make o2 barrier.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,000
    Loc:
    God's Gift to Gassification
    You want 02 barrier.

    ac
  3. NCFord

    NCFord Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    Loc:
    central NC
    that's what I thought.
  4. bmblank

    bmblank Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
    Messages:
    698
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Around me o2 barrier is code. Plus, for steel boilers (nearly all of them) you'll want it. You don't want o2 barrier for domestic water, that's all.
  5. NCFord

    NCFord Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    Loc:
    central NC
    I'm not using any for domestic water, but why would you not want it? I get it for boilers but regular water lines?
  6. bmblank

    bmblank Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
    Messages:
    698
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I'm not entirely sure, to be honest. I wonder if it had something to do with the wide range and speed if pressure changes. I was just told I'm not supposed to use it.
  7. hiker88

    hiker88 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    220
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    Your DHW is not a closed system like your heating loop. Oxygen in your DHW system is purging every time you open the taps - plus I don't think there is much in your dhw system that will rust - your taps etc. are probably stainless. With your heating loop you are going to want to manually purge as much of the air out of your system after fill up, and then have the proper scavengers in place to remove any o2 that happens to get into the system over time.

    EDIT - Probably the short answer is "just to save money." Non barrier being cheaper and all.
  8. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,078
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    Definitely use barrier tube, even for an open system. It will reduce the O2 infiltration and help keep chemical additive from deteriorating.
  9. NCFord

    NCFord Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    Loc:
    central NC
    I just ordered 2 100' rolls from pex universe for $89.00 each including shipping. I hate using the rolled stuff but oh well.
  10. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,293
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    I worked with 3/4" rolled pex water line this weekend. Total PITA. Always thought that sticks were stupid but that was before I had used anything bigger than 1/2".
  11. BoilerMan

    BoilerMan Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,604
    Loc:
    Northern Maine
    FWIW, if you use PEX-a it's much easier to work with. Some of the common trade name or brands are Wirsbo/Uponor Mr.PEX. My supplier sells Uponor, I find the 3/4" to be easier to work with than 1/2" or the Lowes/HD stuff (usually PEX-C). The rolls have much less memory than the PEX-c.

    The O2 barrio stuff is the same material, but with the oxygen barrio applied to the outside of the pipe. It is not certified for potable water because it is not cleaned the same as it is for potable water use. But it is the same physical tubing.

    TS
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,293
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    Is that the case for all o2 barrier tube? My mrpex o2 barrier has the nsf label and I planned to use the leftovers for potable.
  13. BoilerMan

    BoilerMan Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,604
    Loc:
    Northern Maine
    What's the NSF rating? I also used Mr.Pex brand tubing for my slab. It is only label rfh for radiant floor heating. I did use it for a bathroom that was added this year. All of my actual drinking water is in copper.

    TS
  14. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,293
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA

    I looked and yes you are correct, NSF-RFH on the mr. pex 02 barrier which is not the same as NSF-61 that appears on regular drinking water pex. Rats, I planned to use those scraps for plumbing projects.

Share This Page