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Peavey vs. Cant Hook... and why?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Joful, Jul 26, 2012.

?

For firewood felling and scrounging (multiple responses permitted)

  1. Peavey

    29.4%
  2. Cant Hook

    70.6%
  3. 48" handle

    58.8%
  4. 60" handle

    29.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    After borrowing a cant hook for the third time, I figure it's time to buy my own. So, I've been reading old threads on peaveys and cant hooks, and figuring I don't want to buy two or three... having trouble deciding which one to buy. Seems folks are fond of their Logrite bars, so that's the brand, leaving only the head style and length in question.

    So, ye rare folk who have had the fortune to use both... which do you prefer for general firewood felling and scrounging work? I've seen arguments given for both tools, as well as 48" vs. 60" lengths, but nothing entirely convincing.

    The heavy rounds I need to roll are usually heavy due more to length than diameter. This weekend, I'll be bucking and fetching another 18" - 24" diameter log, 30 - 40 feet long (or so the present owner claims).

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  2. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Cant hook
    the sharp point on the peavey is a pain ( sometimes literally )
    48 " is easier to handle & fits on my ATV well. Use it on logs similar to what you are facing.
    Great back saver
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  3. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

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    I use a cant hook with 48" handle. It's great for rolling logs and pulling rounds off the truck bed and onto the splitter. Before getting this great tool it was tough rolling logs and I had to hop up into the truck bed several times when unloading unless I had helper nearby.
    I sometimes wish I had the 5' handle though as I still need to hop up into the truck for those last few rounds I can't reach but since I usually sweep out the bed anyways it's not a big deal.
  4. MarkinNC

    MarkinNC Minister of Fire

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    I have the 60" Logrite peavey and it works well. I've rolled some big logs with it, large enough I had to drive the hook in with a small sledge. I got the peavey style because a friend of mine with a sawmill has used both and he preferred the peavey because you can stab the point in the ground and stop a log from rolling. We live in the mountains so flatness of terrain is less than common. I got the Logrite because he had broken 3 peavey handles over the years and they were $39 to replace at the time I was buying.
  5. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

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    Hi -

    I use a couple. One knock off steel felling leaver with a 36" handle. It's fine for rolling stuff around at home. The one I take in the woods has a 6' Hickory handle. I LOVE it!! ; )

    Enjoy!
    Mike
  6. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    I've been thinking about buying one or the other myself. This cant hook with fiberglass handle and timberjack gets very good reviews.

    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200357988_200357988

    at $45 plus $15 shipping, it's very attractive.

    Edit: oops, I wandered off subject again. Given my limited experience with a peavey and the extra functionality that a cant hook w/ timberjack provides, I say cant hook.
  7. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I agree it looks like a good value, but the question was more which you would want (and why), at any price. Assuming you only want to carry one log rolling tool to a site with you, and not a whole trailer load of them, which one tool would you choose?

    Here's where someone will post a photo of a bulldozer. ;lol
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Cant hook, although all I have at the moment is a Peavey. Unless you're driving logs in a waterway, that big spike coming out of the bottom just gets in the way. Cant hooks are designed to turn logs on flat ground or (more likely) on a sawmill deck or carriage.
  9. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Cant Hook with Log-Lift and a 48" Handle
  10. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I think the handle depends a lot on what you are trying to move. I suppose your body has a bit to do with it, too. I'm 6'1" and weigh about 230, and I'm not very fat. I use that 60" handle for all it's worth sometimes.

    Definitely support the logrite choice. I guess I don't really know, but it looks like the peavey point and cant hook might be interchangeable, by punching out a rolled pin.
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Canthook.jpg
    Cant hook is the way to go. Length of handle is somewhat preference and also has to do with how big of a log you intend to roll. Personally, I have a 4' but would prefer a 3'. And I rarely go to the woods without the cant hook. I use it more than the axe.

    One really nice thing about a cant hook is sometimes I fell a medium sized tree and after limbing, want to slide the log sideways a little to be able to pull it out with the atv. With the cant hook it is easy but not so easy with a peavey. Set the hook on the end of the log and the toe on the side of the log and pull. Saves a lot of work because sometimes you can't roll them because of where they lay but you can move the end of the log enough to put a chain on and be able to miss stumps or roots when you start to pull the log.

    As for the logs, it is so nice to be able to cut maybe 80% through the log. Make all the cuts, then roll it with the cant hook and finish the cuts. This way you don't pinch the bar nor do you try to cut the earth.

    One more thing, I like a wood handle.
    Realstone likes this.
  12. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    +1
    Sounds like we have similar methods. Less sharpening ;)
  13. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Same method I've been using with borrowed cant hooks. I'm going with a new 48" cant hook. Only thing to decide now is aluminum vs wood (having second thoughts on that).
  14. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    If there is a Logrite dealer near you, go and grab hold of both. That's what I did. For the abuse I've given it, I have no regrets spending the extra cash.
  15. amateur cutter

    amateur cutter Minister of Fire

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    Logrite cant hook with the 48" handle. Only time I wanted the 5' handle was on that oak in my avatar, that was one miserable beast to deal with. A C
  16. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    That's why I got the 60". Got into four 4'+ red oaks a couple of years ago. Ugh. Had a loader with a grapple to load up my trailer, but I had to deal with the SOBs when I got home.
  17. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I've used a few wood cant hooks, and like them. In general, I prefer wood handles on my tools, but this may be where I need to make an exception.

    For a tool I'll have 20+ years, I don't really consider the $30 difference in price much of a factor.
  18. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Worried about breakage? I've used them for over 50 years and never broken a handle yet.
  19. MarkinNC

    MarkinNC Minister of Fire

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    Sample size of one is hard to extrapolate to all users. My friend has broken 3. So should all users buy 3 handles or plan on not ever breaking any? I imagine there are a lot of variables involved: how big is the wood your rolling, how good is the piece of wood in the handle, is it hickory or is it ash.

    My point is that factoring in the $39 handle replacement cost in ones purchase is prudent. Handle breakage interrupting ones work, definitely happens, otherwise, I suspect, they would be guaranteed for life.
  20. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I wasn't, but then read so many stories about broken handles from others here, and elsewhere. I'd prefer a wood handle, if someone makes a good quality cant hook with wood. Trouble is, so many wood handled tools available today are junk, and it's hard to spot good from junk on a website.

    Good wood handles, like wood ladders, are riven. Never sawn.
  21. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Most peavey and can't hook handles that I've seen are made of hard maple, and that stuff don't break easily. Always park your wood-handled tools indoors and out of the elements, or they will rot and break, regardless of what kind of wood they're made from. Black locust handles are best, but you have to make them yourself. Just to pitch a friend of mine, Peavey Mfg. handles of all kinds are top shelf. Yep, same firm that made the original Peavey.
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    And a bit of linseed oil on those wood handled tools will make them last even longer.
  23. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    ....as are bows, as it turns out!
    .I've been using riven wood for years, but didn't know it was called that - thanks joful. most of us have wedges, and would only need a drawknife to make our own handles. Here's a good explanation I found:

    pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2009/10/18/theres-oak-then-theres-riven-oak/
  24. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    No problem, osagebow. I'm a woodworker, and a bit of an old-world carpenter, too. I even rived the oak slats on the wagon body I made for my son (the metal chassis was his great-grandfather's wagon ca.1920):

    P3270005.JPG

    One of the best woods for tool handles is dogwood. Shame I just cut up my last two big straight pieces for firewood. I just moved, and haven't set up the new shop yet, so I'm limited on wood storage space at the moment.

    I guess I'm swinging around to the original Peavy Mfg. 48" cant hook. Sorry Logrite. Thanks, Eric! I'll set aside a nice straight piece of dogwood, hickory, or black locust for when the handle fails (if it ever does).
    osagebow likes this.
  25. John Mc

    John Mc New Member

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    I made the mistake of buying a cheap cant hook with timber jack from Northern Tool. THe tip never did seem to want to grab the logs, and after rolling a couple dozen logs (none of them particularly large) the tip of the hook broke off at the weld. From the reviews on their site, I was not the first to have this problem with that tool (though they kept rejecting my review where I mentioned the problem). I replaced the hook with one from another company, and have found it a much better design overall - not weld to break, and better hook geometry, so it grabs better.

    Cant hooks seem to be more useful on flat ground, or around a log deck. IMO, Peaveys are better in the woods, especially on hilly ground. I'm about to buy a Logrite peavey with 48" handle - that length is plenty for my needs. Once I get this I'll sell my old Norther Tool Cant Hook/Timber Jack.

    I debated getting the timberjack attachment for the Logrite, but decided not to. I've found it's quicker to just cut most of the way through, then roll the log and cut the rest of the way, as opposed to jacking up the log, cutting some pieces the repositioning and jacking it up again to cut more pieces. If I did more work on a landing, or in other clear, flat places, I might have more use for the timber jack.

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