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pellet stove for small space in a small town

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by anavr, Sep 19, 2008.

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  1. anavr

    anavr New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Jackson, WY
    I have a small living area space (550sqft). The rest of the house is a strange shape so I'm not expecting the stove to heat any other rooms. The purpose of the stove is to create ambiance and heat the room (which is usually cold) so we can enjoy it. We have decided on a pellet stove.

    Our small town (Jackson WY) only has one local rep for Quadrafire (with lots of install experience) and another for Napoleon (who has installed only a couple)... someone who is not a "do it yourselfer" should probably pick a stove with a local rep to service it. The cost for the small Quadrafire installed is about $4,000 (with logset/remote/vent/labor/freight). Napleon NPS40 $2,500 (with stove/vent/install). A town, 3 hrs away, will install the smallest Harman P38 (manual light) for $2,500.

    My research indicates that local representation is very important for service or problems and Harman is the best & cleaning is easier.

    1) QUIETEST? Small room would prefer a quiet stove… I have read that top loading clinking pellets are more audiable than Harmon’s bottom load… but does the manufacturer and model make a difference in top loading?

    2) HARMAN? Since Harman is the best and in this case one of the least expensive, should I take a chance on this one even though I won’t have a chance to see it/hear it prior to purchase and the rep is 3 hrs away? This Harman model is also a manual light… is this a big inconvenience?

    3) VENTING? Is there any reason NOT to vent directly horizontally back from the stove to the outside wall. Someone suggested that going vertical before exiting the house wall is better. Why? Venting directly out the back looks better especially for a small space.

    THANK YOU!

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  2. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    497
    Loc:
    Northcentral Connecticut
  3. anavr

    anavr New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Jackson, WY
    Very informative and helpful...
    THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR TIME!!!
    One last note, with regarding to venting the pellet stove.
    The house has vinyl siding... does this make a difference in the shape of the vent and piping on the exterior of the house?
  4. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    497
    Loc:
    Northcentral Connecticut
    Not really. The vent goes through the wall in something called a "thimble". It's got an air space to keep the wall, siding, etc. from getting any heat damage (or fire). But, you might find it gets discolored from the smoke easier so will want to go with a vertical section outside before terminating the vent. People have mixed results with siding getting stained when doing a straight thru the wall vent - some do, some don't it depends on how the air/wind flows around your vent termination. However, I've not seen anyone with a vertical run outside getting smoke staining. It's harder to get off of vinyl siding so you might want to keep that in mind when deciding whether to go straight out or straight then up.
  5. anavr

    anavr New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Jackson, WY
    again... thank you very very much!
    Your insight and been most appreciated and helpful!
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