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  1. lmei007

    lmei007 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Boston MA
    Many people told us they use one bag a day. After 2 weeks, we found our Quadra 1200i needs AT LEAST 1.5 bags (almost 2 bags) a day. We run it by using the lowest setting most of time. Because we have a kid at home it burns almost 24 hours a day. We are wondering it is normal? Do those people with one bag burn it 24 hours?

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,252
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    One bag in 24 hours is very low. Your use is much more normal in the weather we have been having in Ma. - Most folks (in the east - and in colder weather) end up running their pellet stoves at 2-4 lbs per hour, which is 50-100 lbs per 24 hours.
    See others posts here and also:
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/You_and_a_BTU/

    (bottom of article).
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,252
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Note - I wanted to quote that particular line, because when it comes to heaters (of any sort), it is best not to listen to what friends and neighbors say - well, let me rephrase that - it is best to listen, but assume that it is like the following:

    1. I tell everyone when I make money in stocks, and no one when I lose money.
    2. The old length of the fish
    3. How big the deer was that got away (while I caught this scrawny one here).

    The point is, they are not lying to you. There are some times of year - and probably even last January (it was 60 degrees one day), when folks in New England can get by on a bag a day. But using BTU measurements is a more accurate way of measuring what you might need - and of what you ARE using. At your rate of output, I'm sure you can see that your stove is putting out MUCH more than an electric heater or two.
  4. Mr Whitfield

    Mr Whitfield Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Messages:
    311
    Loc:
    Northern Cailfornia
    I use a 3/4 bag. Start stove at 3:30 P.M. stove runs till 8:00 A.M. this is on 16 1/2 Hrs on the number 3 setting. Whitfield Advantage II-T 1994
  5. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,252
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Current daytime high temp there?
    Amount of sunshine?

    Point is that stoves on the west coast operate 100% differently than those on the east. See Chimneysweeps post about heating capacities in the Hearth Room:
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/12147/

    Some quotes:
    "The average January temperature in Seattle, WA is 40.9 degrees.
    The average January temperature in Mount Washington, NH is 5.2 degrees.

    Obviously, your stove models aren’t going to heat the same size homes in both locations. "

    "I can testify from personal experience that a homeowner who follows the latter advice and puts a non-catalytic, EPA approved woodstove rated to heat up to 3,000 sq.ft. in his 1,500 sq.ft. well-insulated, single-story house in Bellingham, WA will find that, if he operates the stove at secondary ignition temperatures as he’s supposed to do, he’s going to be enjoying his fire from out in the yard. By the same token, as recently posted on the forum, a homeowner with the same stove installed in a partially-insulated walkout basement in a two-story, 3150 sq.ft. house in MI might find that stove not quite up to the task."

    Point is, your mileage will vary. Use comparisons of BTU, not what happens to other people (unless they are your neighbors with the same house and you can verify)
  6. Tom D

    Tom D New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Loc:
    Watertown , Wisconsin
    i have the harman xxv my wife keeps it at 72 deg. during the day 66 deg at night 2 story house upstairs about 5 deg. cooler total
    square footage 1350.temp during day 24 deg. 12 deg. at night about 1 bag of pellets feed rate 1.5
  7. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,140
    Loc:
    Waxhaw, NC... Formerly North shore Mass
    There are more factors left out.
    Mine would burn 1.5 bags a day if there was alot of cloud cover.
    Home design and insulation plays a huge part in this.
    My home would capture alot of solar heating from about 10am-4pm.
    Window shades are open in the winter and closed in the summer due to the sunshine every bit of free energy helps you save in the long run.....
    When one puts the stove for example in a basement with little tiny windows and a massive heatsink all around them thestove will still be trying to do all the work.
  8. buildingmaint

    buildingmaint Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    459
    Loc:
    Oil City PA
    Ah yes , the pellet usage question. I have a friend who has the same stove as mine and he said that he could heat his 1800 sq ft house on 1 pound an hour of pellets from his stove that sits in his basement. Boy was I surprised when I could not heat 600 sq ft with mine . Turns out that he also uses a natural gas vent less heater and his gas bills are around $100 .00 a month and he uses his forced air gas furness at night. SOOO he really doesn't heat his house with 1 pound an hour. I use about a 40 lbs a day in 30 and above temps, about 50 lbs in 20-30 degree, and 60 lbs in 20 below temps . Last year when it was below zero at night and only in single digits during the day I went through 80 lbs a day . I do keep track of how long I can go before loading it back up .,
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