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Placing in Living Room

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by pelletierry, Jun 15, 2008.

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  1. pelletierry

    pelletierry New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    I have purchased the Harman P61 and it will be installed in mid July. I was thinking of putting it in the living room. Question: If I plan on using the stove to be my primary source of heat for the whole house is it going to be unbearable to sit in the living room with the heat jacked up? Should I think about placing in another area?

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  2. lessoil

    lessoil Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    708
    Loc:
    Rumford, Maine
    Same here!
    The P61A is going in our living room.
    We have a 24' X 32' Cape. We are also wondering if the people in the living room will be in bathing suits!
    The plan is to put a doorway at the bottom of the stairs to enable full circulation of air on the 1st floor.
    It will be interesting to see how well the heat gets upstairs.
    We have ceiling fans in 3 out of 4 rooms on the 1st floor.

    We also ordered 5 tons of pellets.
    We burned 695 gal last year and 900 the year before.
  3. Steveo

    Steveo Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    Messages:
    246
    Loc:
    Maine
    I am putting my P68 in the living room. I love heat and the rest of the family does not love the heat as much as I do so hopefully we can come to a happy medium and keep the whole house warm without overheating the living room lol.
  4. ducker

    ducker Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Leominster, MA
    I had a wood stove in my living room, which I used to heat the majority of the house in the winter.
    And, often it was warmer in that room then in other rooms. When company was over I would have a fan blowing cooler air from another room in to the living room. When it was just us at home, we'd be relaxing in that room in shorts/t-shirts.

    Now with a pellet stove and company over, we'll most likely just dial down the output. So much easier then attempting to gage the dampner/air intake of an older leaker wood stove!
  5. want2bwarmer

    want2bwarmer New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    central maine
    Define unbearable. I love having my lving room a toasty 80 degrees, thanks to my Harman Accentra insert. The rest of the house is cooler, for those who don't like it so warm. And on really chilly Maine below zero nights the living room is only about 72 degrees. I for one, enjoy having at least one really warm room in teh house. And, the stove has cut our oil consumption down nearly in half.

    Now am shopping for a 2nd pellet stove for the family room--will post with questions about that.
  6. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,036
    Loc:
    New Jersey USA
    I assume from the Q&A;that others here, like I, use the living room to "live in", i.e., we don't have a family room.

    We keep the central heat down and get tired of the long sleeve flannel shirts and comforters in the lap at times, so we enjoy running the living room up into the 70s, not 80s, and feeling toasty warm. This, of course, causes the central heat to turn off, and the insert is heating the whole house, a bit cold on the side room to the garage, but our two story floor plan does respond well to heating from the living room.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    48,116
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    There is no universal answer for the question. There are so many individual home variables that make it impossible for one solution to fit all needs. Some of these variables are the openess of the floor plan, house insulation, size of stove, single story or multiple, window losses, location of the stove and probably several others. In general, if the floor plan is very open, one area will not be excessively warm. If the stove is in a separate, closed off room, it might too hot be unless it's regulated by a room thermostat.
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