1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Plumbing Question

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by seige101, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    At some point I'm going to have to replace all the old galvanized in my house (the ID is probably 1/2 of what it used to be due to corrosion and my flow and pressure are getting pretty low) and I'll be going with Pex.

    Whoever laid out my house was a fool and I have some crazy long runs from the main supply, up to the water heater, then double back to the bathrooms. Pex will make those long runs a breeze.

    Pretty sure you can pick up the crimper at a box store for what you'll spend on glue for PVC.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Red iron is easy to address but clear water iron is not but I suspect you know this.. My water softener with GE Osmonics Autotrol 455 head and fine mesh resin handle 13.2 ppm very well. With 3 full time family members it runs about every 12 days.

    Interesting information! I can see where creating your own chlorine makes lots of sense from a cost saving and safety standpoint. What is the most economical and effective way to deal with sulfur/swamp odor? Funny thing is sometimes it comes and goes.. I'll live with this unless it is inexpensive to correct which I suspect will not be the case..

    Thanks,
    Ray
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,453
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    With a large system it is activated carbon. The AC does a great job of grabbing sulfur. You can add AC to residential systems but a better way is to use a system like pyrolox or greensand that is meant to deal with iron/manganese/sulfur which usually shows up in the form of hydrogen sulfide at the tap. If you need to soften, then AC is probably cheaper. If you have iron and sulfur but no need to soften then a greensand or equivalent is probably cheaper.
    raybonz likes this.
  4. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Good stuff HB! Wish I'd talked to you before all this equipment was installed but that may have been before I came to this forum.. At the time my main concern was clear water iron and the fine mesh resin water softener was my best and least expensive option. The main source of hardness here is from the calcite acid neutralizer. You could make a fortune dealing with iron here!
  5. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,453
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    You removed 13 ppm or iron with a softener, that's pretty good. Did you totally eliminate staining in your tubs, toilets, and dishwasher?
  6. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Yes no iron stains anywhere, all white clothes stay white.. This system is supposed to handle 25ppm.. Fine mesh resin is the reason..
  7. heat seeker

    heat seeker Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Messages:
    2,127
    Loc:
    Northern CT
    Might be a good time to move the water heater...
  8. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Not that simple. It is propane so I'd have to put in a new vent for it if I moved it. The builder really should have had the main water supply come in closer to most of the central plumbing instead of the extreme opposite end of the house.

    I guess when this heater dies I could replace it with electric and move it, but then I'd be looking at an expensive wire run. I'd rather just run some Pex and be done with it.
    heat seeker likes this.
  9. tim1

    tim1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    135
    Loc:
    columbia river gorge,portland or
    I bought the wirsbo tool on craigs list for 150.00 and have used it time and time again. I buy the red and blue tubing and the manifolds and love it. Done the pipe, copper, cvc,pcvc, and all the others, this is the best! If I have a really long run, will get the clear, but not that often. Great stuff. I use plastic fittings, not to say they are the best. Tim
  10. dave11

    dave11 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    604
    Loc:
    Western PA
    That's why you buy the tool--so you can use pex fittings, which are dirt cheap, vs sharkbite, which are very expensive.
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,453
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    I like sharkbites and use them, I even have a tee buried in the wall. But. I do not intend to buy them again unless I can't make a crimp fitting work. The tools are now cheap and the sharkbites are still expensive. Honestly, though I've never had a failure, I'm a little nervous about the possibility of those sharkbites leaking someday. They go on so easy, too good to be true.

Share This Page