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Putting the thimble through the wall.

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by tubbster, Aug 26, 2008.

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  1. tubbster

    tubbster Member

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    O.K., I found a online place to get Selkirk direct temp venting system.
    I am trying to plan the install so that I don't have to get too many expensive extras. (This stuff is $$ - more than I thought!)
    I can get a kit to exhaust it out the bottom floor of my raised ranch, an "up and out kit" 4DT-VPHKB
    this is the double wall stuff for intake and exhaust. For the thimble, you just shove a piece of pipe length through it? Sealant between the pipe and thimble? Do I have to re-frame the house to accommodate anything, or do you just cut a hole in the house to accommodate the thimble? Can wiring that may be there rest on the thimble? Does the thimble "sweat" when it gets damn cold?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I question everything as much as I can to avoid mistakes.....

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  2. Czech

    Czech Minister of Fire

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    Tub, I did the same install and asked the same questions. The thimble goes thru the wall, cut the hole per the instructions, use the thimble that Selkirk provides (not sure if it matters?). I was concerned about insulating between the thimble, don't. The clearance using this pipe is very small, I know it is concerning, but follow the instructions and you'll be fine, seal the gap with silicone. What type of stove are you running? I know that with my Quad, the fresh air on the intake didn't have an adaptor, I used a pint sized pvc glue can with the bottom cut out that fit perfect into the tee and again was perfect size on the thread end for the fresh air connection with a hose clamp. Been running it for 3+ years with no problem. Cold there? Come on, it was 32 yesterday in northern MN! I know you guys get your share too, just kidding. Feel free to give me shout, or search on the site with my handle for my issues when I did the install, lots of help here from good folks. The thimble won't sweat, seal up around it, and insulate.
  3. tubbster

    tubbster Member

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    Thanks Hotz.
    Stupid question time: Do you use some huge hole saw, or did you cut it out with a sabre saw?
    Did you wrap the outside diameter of the thimble with insulation (within the wall?)?
  4. woodsman23

    woodsman23 Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Take wall thimble apart and see it unscrews. The use a 6" hole saw and cut through the innerwall, then check for any wiring pipes whatever and remove insulation from around the area. Put hole saw back in wall and continu to cut until you can see the drill bit part of the saw coming through the vinyl siding (or what ever you have). Push the inner part of the thimble through (thicker od part and have someone hold it while you go outside and install the thinner od and screw together. Then simply attach the thibmle to the wall out and in and cut hole (3"in siding) and reinstall siding.
  5. peterpski666

    peterpski666 New Member

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    I am planning this install as well for this week, and having seen a house or to go together and apart my plan is to use a level/laser and set my center line for my exit pipe off my stove, then use the pipe and thimble to see where they land on the wall in relation to my studs. Figuring in some adjustment room in case something is wierd behind my drywall, hand saw out a small inspection hole, then improve that to thimble pipe size if all is clear. Pull and restuff my wall insulation to be off the thimble by a few inches, then high light via laser the center point of the inside exterior wall, test fit my thimble. Mark & punch a pilot hole center, then go outside, draw a arc around the centered thimble pipe, drill (4) 1" holes with a wood bit 1/2" inside the arc, and cut with a recip saw from hole to hole along my mark. You can make this harder or easier depending on your comfort level.

    A chimney sweep friend said that the fiberglas insulation has a high fire resistance but I want to keep it off my thimble just in case. More important than the insulation would be any Romex tacked to my studs that have a lower fire resistance/melting point (as well as any cable/CAT-5 you may have). If so, you could add a heat shield plate on the stud. I wouldnt use a hole saw unless you know for certain you dont have anything live electrically behind the wall or you have a real soft touch, and a $4 drywall saw is immensely cheaper than a one use $40 6" hole saw and arbor. That said, a hole saw or reciprocating saw will cut your outside wall opening just fine, choose what you can borrow, recip blades are cheap too. It also depends on if the house is new, ie drywall vs plaster, logs, stone, etc...and if you have blown in insulation vs fiberglas. In older homes especially, there can be a crazy mess of stuff behind walls.

    Hope that helps
  6. slls

    slls Minister of Fire

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    My thimble instructions say to frame the 7 1/2 inch opening, I am going to frame it with 3/4 boards. I believe the reason is to keep loose insulation or what ever away from the thimble, air space is needed.
  7. kklockars@cox.net

    kklockars@cox.net New Member

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    it is also so there is something for the screws to bite into other than drywall, the 2x4 should line up with where the screws for the thimble are going to be
  8. deep wood

    deep wood New Member

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    I'm using Excel vent pipe and purchased the "Excel Insulated Wall Thimble".....they are not kidding. The thimble comes with insulation inside the thimble. The directions very clearly indicate that the insulation stays in the thimble "put the interior portion of the thimble in the hole....if the insulation sticks out more than 2" past the outside wall, trim it flush". Am I missing something? The discussion about insulation touching the pipe has me concerned. The insulation "touches" the pipe with an Excel thimble. I was concerned less when I ran the stove on high for several hours and was able to place my bare hand on the vent pipe several feet before it enters the wall thimble....but now I'm second guessing the installation based on this discussion.
  9. tubbster

    tubbster Member

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    Was that the Selkirk direct vent thimble?

    Selkirk is totally out of the Syracuse market as far as I can tell. this is something I would really like to buy local, yet no one here has heard of it.
  10. slls

    slls Minister of Fire

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    No, DuraVent pro.
  11. deep wood

    deep wood New Member

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    I bumped this hoping to receive a reply. Any advice? Is this install OK?
  12. cncpro

    cncpro New Member

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    If you used genuine "pellet approved" pipe and followed the manufacturer's instructions, what are you worried about ?
  13. BignBeefy

    BignBeefy Member

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    Well he is worried his house is going to burn down LOL. I have the same thimble and pipe system and found the insulation odd to,but left it in per directions and when the inner and outer sleeve goes together you shouldnt see any insulation,which is the fiberous style,not pink or yellow fiberglass from what I remember. That is a great pipe from what I have read,and you should be fine. I used an infrared thermometer on my pipe straight out of a P68 and it wasnt very hot at all.I can do a test again when I fire the stove up,but that wont be for a while.Email excel if you are still unsure.
  14. deep wood

    deep wood New Member

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    Thank you!....I feel better knowing I didn't misinterpret the instructions. Yes, great pipe (expensive too)...thanks again!
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