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question about double wall pipe

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by steve reynolds, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. steve reynolds

    steve reynolds New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2012
    Messages:
    43
    hello,
    i just installed a wood stove i bought from a friend, it is a blaze king royal heir 2100. and my gawd it runs us out of here.. no more propane bill here!
    anyway my question is, i bought the stainless double wall off craigslist and one of the sections the insulation is broken up, there is a gray powder coming out of it when i turn it upside down. it seems like when i turn it upside down it seems like there is about 6 inches of the insulation missing by the feel of it falling from one end to the other. would it be safe to use that section of pipe above my roofline? there is no way in the world i would use it going through my ceiling and attic but seems logical it would be ok above roof line. just wanting some expert opinions on it.

    also i am wondering if the good double wall should get hot? i can touch it but cant keep my hand on it for more than a few seconds..
    thanks

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  2. theonlyzarathu

    theonlyzarathu Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2011
    Messages:
    104
    Loc:
    Bar Harbor, Maine
    Yes, near the fire good double wall SS pipe will get too hot to touch. I had it on the outside of my house, and through the inside in my cabin. Just make sure that you have the proper clearance from combustables. The big problem that you might have above the roof line is increased deposits of creosote due to no insulation at that point. But I defer to others.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,610
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If it's defective pipe, I would replace it. It would probably still work ok if it's the topmost section and entirely outdoors, but I don't see the point in gambling with it. Peace of mind is important during a howling gale and low temps outside.
  4. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,887
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY

    +1. Climbing on the snow and ice covered roof in the middle of winter to clean creosote out of a piece of pipe I knew was defective wouldn't appeal to me either.

    Matt

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