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Question About New Emissions Regs

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Eric Johnson, Feb 28, 2008.

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  1. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    An article on OWBs in the current issue of Northern Woodlands describes the new regs for Vermont and Maine, effective March 31. As the following passage explains, new boilers will have to meet or exceed these standards in order to be sold after the implementation date. However the article doesn't state whether this new standard apply only to OWBs or all wood-fired boilers and furnaces. Does anybody know?

    A rule incorporating much of the NESCAUM model goes into effect in Vermont on March 31, 2008. The emission standard will be 0.44 pounds of particulates per million BTUs and will improve to 0.32 pounds in 2010. Maine’s law goes into effect at the same time, but using the EPA’s emission standard of 0.60 pounds rather than 0.44. Maine will, however, also go to 0.32 pounds in the spring of 2010. Both states have setback and stack height provisions.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. jebatty

    jebatty Minister of Fire

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    Can you find a cite to the actual rule? As some prior posts have stated, the definition of OWB could be anything not in a dwelling.

    BTW, I think it is urgent that those with wood gasification boilers start to get to know the planning and zoning people, as well as state pollution regulators, as it is far too easy for a regulation to paint with a broad brush out of ignorance. We have to educate the regulators about the efficiency of these units, and we have to distinguish these units from the old style OWB.

    In this regard, I long have provided volunteer assistance in ordinance drafting to ur county planning and zoning office, and when I got the Tarm, I let everybody know. Our zoning administrator has been out to see it operate, and he really is impressed. Same thing with our county land commissioner (the county manages about 180,000 acres of forest land, and firewood sales are an important element of the county forest plan).

    The county land commissioner spread the word to the county economic development corporation, and on March 11 I am making a presentation to the economic development corporation on the positive economic benefits of this technology for home owners and small businesses.

    An area forestry group also is interested in learning about the technology, and I am waiting to set up a meeting with a forestry PR person who intends to do an article. Another forestry magazine has inquired about me writing an article for publication.

    On Tuesday I met with the our two local state representatives and the state senator to our state legislature, and I told all of them about this technology, the lack of emissions and smoke, the efficiency, and the great reduction in cost to the homeowner who needs to buy wood for heating. They all were interested and I will be following up with more information for them.

    We've got to spread the word, or the word that comes from above may not be good for us. Wood boilers have a [justified] bad rap in the minds of many, and we have to change the mindset.
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I second all of that.
  4. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    Heres the tiny url link to the State of Maine page on OWB. Scroll down about halfway for OWB definition.

    http://tinyurl.com/2gtctf

    Will
  5. jebatty

    jebatty Minister of Fire

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    The definition (note: no exception for a gasification boiler).

    8-C. Outdoor wood boiler. "Outdoor wood boiler" means a fuel burning device:
    A. Designed to burn wood or other solid fuels; [2007, c. 442, §1 (NEW).]
    B. That the manufacturer specifies for outdoor installation or in structures not normally occupied by humans; and [2007, c. 442, §1 (NEW).]
    C. That heats building space and water through the distribution, typically through pipes, of a fluid heated in the device, typically water or a mixture of water and antifreeze. [2007, c. 442, §1 (NEW).]
  6. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    The "manufacturer specifies" part is interesting.
  7. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    I will try to get a call in to my representative on Fri. for some insight into this issue.
    Will
  8. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    I talked to my local Maine state representative on Fri. It turns out he was on the committee to help draft the regulations on the OWB. There are two dealers of the OWB's in his district. He will be sending me any information pertaining to the new law in Maine. I asked him if he knew about gasification technology. He said he did.I will post whatever I can when I receive it.

    Will
  9. Grover59

    Grover59 Member

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    Anyone in Maine that is into OWB or burning wood probably knows about these gasifier boilers considering the people responsible for the change in the emmision regulations live in Maine, and came up with the Black Bear boiler. It is my opinion that any downdraft gasifier will burn much cleaner then these new standards even the 2010 regulation, I have seen the numbers for the Black Bear and they are much lower then these numbers. I am sure that other gasifiers are all in about the same ball park. When I first saw the Black Bear run I was very excited, I actually witnessed people asking where is the propane tank, they only saw the secondary burn and did not know that it was burning wood, you could not see any real smoke coming from the stack. Now just watching this forum and seeing all of these new boilers coming down the pike it is easy to see that gasification boilers will be the boiler of choice. Now this is just my opinion but anyone looking to get a boiler should be looking to nothing other then a gasifier type, they burn much cleaner and use less wood, and I also believe that a storage tank makes life a lot easier, at least it has for me, but everyone has an opinion.

    It is going to be exciting in the next year as to where this is going to go, I do know I want to be involved if things work out I would like to be a dealer in my neck of the woods for some gasifier, I am not a saleman but I can sell what I believe in and I do believe in these boilers.

    Its gonna be fun,

    Steve
  10. sled_mack

    sled_mack New Member

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    It depends. In warmer weather, I set my timer for 3 hours. The boiler runs full out for 3 hours then shuts down. Since it's only source of air is down through the chimney, it is choked off pretty well. And, the hot coals tend to fall down and block the nozzles. You might see a wisp of smoke for 15 min after shutting down, but that's it. The wood remaining in the upper chamber turns to a charcoal consistency. At the next firing, I simply add more wood and turn it back on. It will hold those hot coals for as much as 24 hours.

    If I set the timer for 5 hours, enough of the wood is burned up that there will be no smoke when it shuts down. If I set the timer for 2 hours, it will smoke for a little while (maybe 30 to 45 minutes) before it stops.

    It's probably not the most efficient way to operate, but it has been the most convenient. I only built 3 or 4 fires all year long.
  11. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    If it goes into idle early in the burn cycle, I'll get a little smoke. Not much. Later in the cycle, it's nothing but heatwaves, just like when it's running full-out. No creosote in the hx or chimney, either. The EKO has a "puff" features that starts up the blower periodically during the idle cycle to keep the coal bed alive for restart. I've never had a fire actually go out. I don't use a timer.

    I've also never seen the temp during idle exceed 85 (C), but my wife claims that it can get up to 95 when she's in charge. I don't know how she does that, but I suspect it has something to do with excessive idle periods (she tends to fill the thing up and crank up the heat in the house to 80 or 85 when I'm not looking.

    I'm trying to figure out how you only get combustion air through the chimney, sled_mack. Doesn't it flow through the blowers? I know there are swing-door vents in there, but I think they go the other way i.e., air can enter through the blower opening, but it can't exit.

    Typically, when the refractory is very hot, gasification continues to some extent when the blowers shut down. The natural draft pulls some wood gas through the nozzles and it ignites--at least for awhile.
  12. sled_mack

    sled_mack New Member

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    Eric,

    It may pull air through the fans initially, but once it sits for a while it seems to stop. My test was to hold a match in front of the fan openings - no flicker of the flame and no smoke getting pulled into the fans, so I figured no air flow. This is checking it an hour or so after the timer shuts it down. I've never checked it right after the fans stop. I'd guess that as the fire cools, it pulls less air, too?
  13. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    All my information is based on assumptions, so I'll defer to your field testing. Does your controller have the "puff" feature?
  14. sled_mack

    sled_mack New Member

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    My controller does have the puff feature. But, the timer cuts power to the controller entirely, so it is disabled. The purpose is to save a bed of coals for the next loading.

    There is no doubt I use less wood this way compared to buring continuously and having the boiler idle when the tank is hot. I might be able to use less if I let the fire burn out completely and started a new fire later. Especially, if I kept it going continuously until the tank was maxed out then shut it down. But the convenience of what I am doing can't be beat (for me). And, as long as I have the timer set long enough that the burn is pretty much complete, I don't think I'm losing much in the way of efficiency.
  15. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    My legislator got back to me today. Heres the information he forwarded to me. Due to character limit for each post I will split each page into different posts.

    Will


    DEP INFORMATION SHEET



    Regulation of Outdoor Wood Boilers



    Effective Date: November 9, 2007 Contact: 1-800-452-1942 or 207-287-2437

    Revised: January 23, 2008





    HEATING APPLIANCES AFFECTED BY OUTDOOR WOOD BOILER RULES:

    Outdoor wood boilers (OWBs) are heating appliances that burn firewood and are located outside of the building which
    they are heating. The formal industry name for an OWB is “Outdoor Wood Fired Hydronic Heating Appliance.” They
    are also known as outdoor wood furnaces and water stoves. Conventional OWBs consist of a firebox surrounded by a
    water jacket, a weatherproof cabinet and a short smokestack. Some outdoor wood boilers do not have a weatherproof
    cabinet and must be installed in an outbuilding such as a garage or shed. OWBs with a heat input of less than 3 million
    Btus per hour (MMBtu/Hr) are subject to regulation by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). These
    regulations were effective November 9, 2007. Larger OWBs have to comply with different DEP regulations.

    CHOOSING AND SITING AN OUTDOOR WOOD BOILER

    A standard method to test and evaluate the emissions and efficiency of OWBs was established nationally in 2007 by the
    U.S. EPA. New boilers are being designed and tested to determine how clean and efficient they are. When boiler tests
    are published, they will appear at the federal EPA web site www.epa.gov/woodheaters. Outdoor wood boilers with
    emissions equal to or less than 0.60 pounds of particulate per 1 million Btu of fuel burned (lbs/MMBtu) will qualify for
    the EPA Outdoor Wood-Fired Heater program. Look for the "orange label" to check for the EPA certified emission rating.

    As of April 1, 2008, Maine retailers must phase out high emitting units over the following year, and only restock with
    units that have an EPA certified particulate emission rating of no more than 0.60 lbs/MMBtu. By April 1, 2009, the sale of
    units with emissions higher than 0.60 lbs/MMBtu will be phased out completely. Starting April 1, 2010, further
    reductions to a 0.32 lbs/MMBtu emission limit will be required for all new units sold under Maine law.

    Retailers must provide buyers with a copy of the DEP “Control of Emissions from Outdoor Wood Boilers” rules that
    contain the emission limits and setback requirements along with the owner’s manual and additional written information.

    SITE SETBACK REQUIREMENTS

    OWB installations need to meet minimum setback requirements designed to protect public health. The setback distance
    required depends on the unit’s emission rating, with reduced setbacks allowed for cleaner-burning OWB models. The
    setback table below lists the minimum distance an OWB unit needs to be from any neighboring property line. Buyers
    should carefully consider whether their property configuration provides the necessary space to meet the setback
    requirements before purchasing a boiler unit.



    OWB Emission Rating
    (in pounds per million BTUs
    or lbs/MMBtu)

    Minimum Setback Distance from
    Property Line

    (in feet)

    0.32 lbs/MMBtu

    50 feet

    0.60 lbs/MMBtu

    100 feet

    >0.60 lbs/MMBtu
    (including uncertified OWBs)

    250 feet

    Special Cases*

    500 feet



    *Special Cases apply to any State licensed school, daycare or health facility.

    If terrain conditions could complicate air flow patterns on a parcel of land (e.g. in a valley, hilly, or tall trees nearby), it
    may be necessary to install the OWB even farther away than the minimum setback distances to avoid costly changes that
    could be required later if a nuisance condition occurs when the boiler is operated.




    MINIMUM STACK HEIGHT REQUIREMENTS

    The minimum stack height for all OWB units is at least 10’ from the ground. However, the stack height needs to be
    extended at least 2’ higher than the peak of the building served by the OWB (or the nearest building in the case of a pool
    heater) if either of the following are met:

    1) If an OWB, installed after 11/9/07, with a particulate emission rating greater than 0.60 lbs/MMBtu (or an uncertified
    OWB), is within 500’ of any abutting residence; or

    2) If an OWB, installed after 11/9/07, with a particulate emission rating of 0.60 lbs/MMBtu or less, is within 300’ of any
    abutting residence.

    If a residence is built on abutting property after the OWB is installed, the stack height will have to be increased to meet
    the criteria described above. Additional stack height requirements may be necessary in conditions where topography or
    other buildings restrict the dispersion of smoke and create a nuisance condition.

    THIRD PARTY SALE OF USED OWB UNITS:

    The sale of used OWBs is allowed but the buyer must comply with the setback distances and stack height listed for the
    emission rating of the boiler. If the emission rate is not documented, the boiler must meet the criteria listed for an
    uncertified OWB.

    LARGE OWBs AND COMMERCIAL INSTALLATIONS

    OWBs that are larger than 350,000 Btu/hr, and all OWBs for commercial applications must have an engineering analysis
    to determine a number of factors that will determine the proper boiler size, stack height and other items specific to the
    particular installation and the particular site.

    RAIN CAPS

    No rain caps are allowed unless required by manufacturer specifications. Rain caps can restrict the flow of air and help to
    create a nuisance condition.
  16. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    Next part of DEP sheet

    ALLOWED & PROHIBITED FUELS

    Allowed Fuels: Only CLEAN WOOD or wood pellets from clean wood can be burned in OWBs. (Clean wood has no
    paint, stain or other types of coating or treatments with preservatives of any type.) Home heating oil, propane or natural
    gas may be used as auxiliary fuel in dual-fired OWBs designed to burn those types of fuel.

    Prohibited Fuels: ..any wood that is not clean; .garbage; tires; lawn clipping or yard waste; .materials containing plastic;
    materials containing rubber; waste petroleum products; paints and paint thinners; chemicals; glossy or colored papers;
    construction & demolition debris; plywood; particleboard; salt water driftwood and other salt-water saturated materials;
    manure; animal carcasses; asphalt products; materials containing asbestos; materials containing lead, mercury, or other
    heavy or toxic metals; and coal (unless the OWB is specifically designed to burn coal).



    VISIBLE EMISSION STANDARD & PROHIBITION ON NUISANCE CONDITIONS

    No OWB, regardless of the date of installation, can cause or allow a smoke plume of 30% or greater opacity for more than
    two six-minute periods in any 3-hour period of time. Opacity is a visual measurement by an EPA- or DEP-certified
    smoke reader. It is a measure of the "thickness or density of the smoke" emitted from a stack. OWBs producing 30% or
    greater opacity need to modify operating practices to reduce air pollution problems. Ask for DEP’s Operating Tips for
    OWBs by calling the number above.

    No OWB, regardless of the date of installation, is allowed to operate when conditions cause any visible smoke plume to
    cross onto adjacent owner’s land and buildings for 12 minutes or more in any hour. Sending smoke on adjacent land or
    buildings for 12 minutes or more is a nuisance and a violation of the regulation.






  17. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

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    Maine Department of Environmental Protection
    Good Operating Practices for Outdoor Wood Boilers
    January 2008




    Introduction
    All wood burning equipment, including outdoor wood boilers, will emit smoke at least some of the time. Wood
    smoke is made up of many different chemicals and some can cause harm if inhaled. The amount of smoke that
    is produced depends on the actual design of the wood burner, its installation and its operation. Users can
    minimize the amount of smoke produced by following all the installation and maintenance practices
    recommended by the manufacturer. Information about outdoor wood boilers can be found at
    http://www.maine.gov/dep/air/woodsmoke/woodcombustion.htm; included below are some additional “good
    operating practice” recommendations.

    Installation
    Make sure that the outdoor wood boiler is installed correctly, according to all the manufacturer’s requirements.
    All installations must be done by a Master Solid Fuel Boiler Technician with the exception that Maine law
    allows homeowners to install heating equipment in their own single-family residence. (Note that homeowner
    installation must still comply with the Maine boiler codes as well as any local codes.) Boilers larger than
    350,000 Btu/hr and those used for supplying heat or hot water to commercial establishments must have an
    engineering assessment to determine criteria such as the appropriate boiler size and design.
    Two important installation criteria are adequate stack height and appropriate setback as required by Department
    of Environmental Protection (DEP) regulations. In addition, any smoke stack extensions must be made of
    material approved by Underwriters’ Laboratories or by a nationally accredited testing laboratory. Removing
    rain-caps from the stack, if allowed by the manufacturer, will let the smoke rise better, and new installations
    must be without rain-caps unless required by the manufacturer. If a spark arrestor is required, ask for one that
    does not include a solid top.

    Fuel Quality
    The quality of the fuel can have a large effect on the amount of smoke that is produced and on the efficiency of
    the boiler. Some manufacturers claim that their boilers can burn green wood, but experience shows that this can
    not be done without creating a lot of smoke. Green wood has a high water content and some of the energy from
    the wood is used to boil off the water contained in the wood. Most firewood should be "seasoned" for 6 months
    to a year and have a moisture content of 20-25%. Some species, such as oak, need a longer period of seasoning
    because of their high water content.
    Wood that is too dry can also create a lot of smoke. Kiln-dried wood will burn too fast and can produce a lot of
    sparks. The best practice is to mix kiln-dried wood with seasoned wood to control the burn rate or save the
    kiln-dried wood for kindling.
    Storing firewood under cover is another important factor that affects the smoke produced. Seasoned firewood
    will be wasted if it is not protected from the weather. It takes a lot of energy to melt and evaporate snow and
    ice, so burning wood that is snow- or ice-covered will use up energy that should go to heat your home.

    Firewood Size
    Size of the firewood can also play an important factor in smoke emissions and efficiency. A full load of small
    wood will present a large amount of surface area to the fire. This effect is similar to burning kiln-dried wood.
    The fire will burn fast, spend too short a time in the boiler to transfer heat well and create a lot of smoke. Mix
    small diameter pieces of firewood with larger pieces of firewood.

    Do Not Overload
    A load of wood smoldering for a long time in the boiler can create more emissions than when the wood burns in
    a moderate fire. A load of wood that lasts for over a day may be convenient, but with the fire box at a low
    temperature, the smoke burns less completely and the cooler smoke does not rise well.
    Here the best practice is to fill the boiler to burn for only 6-10 hours. A moderate size fire that burns hot is the
    most efficient and cleanest way to burn wood in a conventional boiler. However, you will have to learn the
    correct timing through experience. The colder the weather, the more wood will be needed to get the appropriate
    burn time.
    Each boiler is designed for a maximum load, which may be indicated on the boiler doorway. To burn well, the
    boiler has to have a certain amount of air in the combustion chamber. Filling the boiler beyond the
    manufacturer’s fill-line or recommendations will reduce the amount of air around the fire. The result will be
    poor combustion until the load burns down.
    Burn Only Clean Wood
    The only thing that should be burned in the boiler is clean wood. Fuel oil and propane are allowed only if it is a
    multi-fuel boiler and this practice is recommended by the manufacturer. Below is a list of materials that are
    prohibited as fuels by DEP regulations.
     NO garbage;
     NO tires;
     NO lawn clippings or yard waste;
     NO materials containing plastic;
     NO materials containing rubber;
     NO waste petroleum products;
     NO paints and paint thinners;
     NO chemicals;
     NO glossy or colored papers;
     NO construction and demolition debris;
     NO plywood;
     NO particleboard;
     NO salt water driftwood and other previously
    salt-water saturated materials;
     NO manure;
     NO animal carcasses;
     NO asphalt products;
     NO materials containing asbestos;
     NO materials containing lead, mercury, or other
    heavy or toxic metals; and
     NO coal, unless the outdoor wood boiler is
    specifically designed to burn coal.

    How Much Smoke Is Too Much?
    One way to measure smoke is by "percent opacity." 100% opacity
    means that you cannot see through the smoke; 0% means no smoke is
    visible. More smoke means that more unhealthy emissions are being
    produced. Wood boilers are limited to 30% opacity except for 2 sixminute
    periods in any three hours (the smoke opacity can be more
    than 30% for only those 2 six-minute periods). A wood fire usually
    produces white smoke, but the opacity standard applies to both black
    and white smoke. Judging the amount of smoke opacity takes special
    training. You can contact the DEP for a list of certified "smoke
    readers."

    Continues on next post.
    There was a graphic showing the opacity scale. I will try to post it later.



    Next part on following post
  18. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    617
    Loc:
    Sabattus Maine
    Maine Department of Environmental Protection
    Good Operating Practices for Outdoor Wood Boilers
    January 2008

    How Much Smoke Is Too Much?
    One way to measure smoke is by "percent opacity." 100% opacity
    means that you cannot see through the smoke; 0% means no smoke is
    visible. More smoke means that more unhealthy emissions are being
    produced. Wood boilers are limited to 30% opacity except for 2 sixminute
    periods in any three hours (the smoke opacity can be more
    than 30% for only those 2 six-minute periods). A wood fire usually
    produces white smoke, but the opacity standard applies to both black
    and white smoke. Judging the amount of smoke opacity takes special
    training. You can contact the DEP for a list of certified "smoke
    readers."
    Breathing wood smoke is unhealthy and can make life difficult for many people. By law, the smoke produced
    by the boiler cannot create a "nuisance" on neighboring property. The term nuisance applies to anything that
    will cause injury or prevent someone from enjoying their property. For outdoor wood boilers, nuisance also
    includes any visible smoke crossing onto neighboring property or impacting buildings for 12 minutes or more in
    an hour. It is the responsibility of outdoor wood boiler owners to make sure that the smoke they produce
    complies with the opacity and nuisance criteria.
  19. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
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    Model ordinance:

    OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE ORDINANCE 2007
    SAMPLE
    Ordinance 2007 -1.
    AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND the Code of the (town. cit~. village. borough) in
    County, in (STATE) by adding a new chapter, to be entitled Outdoor Wood Furnaces,
    which chapter provides for the same.
    Be it enacted by the (town. citv. village. borough -Councilor Board) of the (town. citY- village.
    borough) as follows:
    The Code of the (town. citY. village. borough) is hereby amended by adding thereto a new
    chapter, to be Chapter -, Outdoor Wood Furnace, to read as follows:
    OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES (Referred to as: OUmOOR WOOD BOILERS OR
    OUTDOOR WOOD HYDRONIC HEATERS) ,
    § -1 Definitions
    § -2 Regulations for Outdoor Wood Furnaces
    § -3 Substantive Requirements
    § -4 Appeals Variances
    § -5 Violations and penalties
    § -6 Civil Proceedings
    § -7 Severability
    § -8 Effective Date
    § -1 Definitions
    A. Outdoor Wood Furnace: Any equipmentd, device, appliance or apparatus or any p art thereof,
    which is installed, affixed or situated outdoors for the primary purpose of combustion of
    fuel to produce heat or energy used a a component of a heating system providing heat for
    any interior space or water source. An Outdoor Wood Furnace may also be referred to as an
    Outdoor Wood Boiler or Outdoor Wood Hydronic Heater.
    B. Chimney: Any flue or flues that carries off exhaust from an Outdoor Wood Furnace firebox or
    burn chamber.
    C. Natural Wood: Wood, which has not been painted, varnished or coated with a similar material,
    has not been pressure treated with preservatives and does not contain resins or glue as in
    plywood or other composite wood products.
    D.
    Existing Outdoor Wood Furnace: An Outdoor Wood Furnace that was purchased and installed
    prior to the effective date of this local law

    -2 Regulations for Outdoor Wood Furnaces
    No person shall, from the effective date of this local law, construct, install or establish an
    Outdoor Wood Furnace unless:
    A. The existing Outdoor Wood Furnace was constructed in stalled, established prior to the
    effective date of this section;
    B.
    No person shall, from the effective date of this local law operate an Outdoor Wood Furnace
    unless such operation conforms with the manufacturer's instructions regarding such operation
    and the requirements of this local law regarding fuels that may be burned in an Outdoor Wood
    Furnace as set forth in Sections 3.A and 3.B of this local law and chimney height as set forth
    in Section 3.D of this local law.
    c.
    All new Outdoor Wood Furnaces shall be constructed established in stalled, operated and
    maintained in conformance with the manufacturer's instructions and the requirements of
    this local law. In the event of a conflict, the requirements of this local law shall apply unless
    the manufacturer's instructions are stricter, in which case the manufacturer's instructions
    shall apply.
    D. The owner of any new Outdoor Wood Furnace shall produce the manufacturer's owner's
    manual or installation instructions to the appropriate department to review prior
    to installation.
    E.
    All new Outdoor Wood F furnace's shall b e laboratory tested and listed to appropriate safety
    standards such as U L, CAN/CSA, ANSI or other applicable safety standards.
    F.
    EXCEPTION: If an existing Outdoor Wood Furnace is, through the course of a proper
    investigation by local authorities, creating a verifiable nuisance, as defined by local or
    state law, the following steps may be taken by the owner and the appropriate department)
    having jurisdiction:
    (1). Modifications made to the unit to eliminate the nuisance such as extending the chimney,
    or relocating the Outdoor Wood Furnace or both.
    (2). Cease and desist operating the unit until reasonable steps can be taken to ensure that the
    Outdoor Wood Furnace will not be a nuisance.
  20. Willman

    Willman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    617
    Loc:
    Sabattus Maine
  21. Grover59

    Grover59 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    I do almost the exact same thing I also have a timer, it's a coin timer but it works great when I get home about 6pm or so I will throw some coins in the timer and set it to 3 hours I then open the top door and the bottom door. Most of the time I have coals that ignite and all I do is add wood, I will put about 6 splits in and then close the top door. I then wait until the stack temp goes above 400 and close the bypass damper and it starts gasifying, all done it will shut down in about 3 hours, if I want to heat the tank more I put more wood in and more coins in the timer.
    In the morining I may start another fire for about 2 hours before I go to work, however with warm weather I don't need to do that lately I have been building one fire a day. The tank and timer work really well and I can build the fire when I want.

    Steve
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