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QUESTION: Birds Nesting and Pellet Stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by petey305, Feb 8, 2006.

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  1. petey305

    petey305 New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    I just made a change to the exterior portion of my pellet stove pipe. Previously, when I bought this place, the outlet was at groud level (basically the thimble just came out at ground level, and had some elbows on it). It was pointing down, but was only about 3-4" away from grass & leaves. WAY to close to combustibles for my comfort level, not to mention I couldn't imagine it wouldn't get blocked by snow (I live in NH).

    So, I changed it. I added a 90 elbow pointing up, then a 3 ft straight section (held on by the applicable T bracket), then another 90 pointing out and added a horizontal vent cap. Now it's about 4 ft from any combustibles (with the 3ft section and the space created by the 90's). I also dug out 3 ft around the thimble and added crushed stone.

    That's all well and good, but the cap seems strange to me. It's a Simpson Duravent 3185 Horizontal Cap (picture attached). What I find interesting is that there is nothing to stop things from getting in there. I'm not to concerned about it right now (it's winter and it's running), but what is going to stop birds from nesting inside this thing during the spring. Seems like a nice cozy place to get out of the weather to me.

    Is there anything I can do to prevent this? I was thinking some sort of wire grate or something, but I'm concerned that this sort of thing could get creosote build up on it and become a fire hazard. Any suggestions? I hope I don't have to just clean birds nests outta this thing every fall. :)

    Thanks!

    JP

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  2. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Just put some mesh over it. It might collect fly ash but should be ok. you can always remove it in the winter if too.
  3. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Shane, we have had backpressure issues with screening the exaust, and it makes the combustion blower whine. At least thats true on my stoves and my altitude.
  4. petey305

    petey305 New Member

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    Thanks guys,

    what about something with bigger holes than mesh. Not as big as say, chicken wire, but maybe something with 1/2" holes or something. Do you think that would still create back pressure issues?

    JP
  5. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    sinpson caps are designed just they way they are, if it were a good idea i think they would offer it as a accessory. I would stay away from anything that will put restriction on the stove. But this is not fact, just the way i look at it logicaly. Im shure people will tell you its ok, and some will tell you that its not. Point is, i have never known simpson to not make a buck anyway they can, and thats true for any company. Why would they not install it or offer it as a accessory?
  6. Homefire

    Homefire New Member

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    Hi Petey305

    Do you know how long the exhaust worked like it was? Seems at that level you should of had mice or other rodents.

    I wouldn't put any screen over the end, just do your normal maintainence and clean the pipe every couple tons of fuel and in the fall before you start using it again.
    I suspect that you could use the stove even in the summer on certain nights in NH. i was there last June and it was fairly cold at night.
    Just keep the stove clean and you will be fine.
  7. petey305

    petey305 New Member

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    Thanks again folks. I'll probably leave it open and just clean it regularly.

    > Do you know how long the exhaust worked like it was? Seems at that level you should of had mice or other rodents.

    Interestingly enough, the previous owners put a screen over the outlet (I'm assuming to prevent that). The reason I wanted to ask the question (if this could be done, and how to do it right), was because the grate they put over it was CAKED with creasote. Add that to the fact that it was exhausting onto the grass and leaves...ya, not using the stove until I replaced all that was an easy decision. ;)

    JP
  8. pelletheat

    pelletheat New Member

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    At the end of the heating season unplug the stove & cover the exhaust termination. Make sure to remove any cover before trying to use the stove in the fall. Since most stoves use some type of pressure switch, using any type of screen may allow fly ash build up and cause the stove to shutoff because of poor draft.
  9. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I want to add to what has been said. A simple solution. After the season is finished, with a rubber band and fiberflass screen
    just attach a piece Just remember to take it off before starting it up again.
    MiountainStoveGuy is correct cautioning you about back pressure and restrictions when in opperations
  10. hearthtools

    hearthtools Moderator Emeritus

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    I would also change the Bottom 90 to a T clean out.
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