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Question on the BioMax

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Eric Johnson, Dec 22, 2007.

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  1. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I was looking at the picture of the BioMax on the New Horizon website, and I can't figure out how the gas exits the gasification chamber. I'm also wondering about ash accumulation. That's a lot smaller ash reservoir than I have on my EKO. I'm wondering how often you have to clean out the ashes.

    I know Rob Reinhart has a BioMax and I think one other member as well. Any other observations on how this thing works?

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  2. kuribo

    kuribo Feeling the Heat

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    I'm guessing to the left and right through the half circle step in the refractory. It doesn't look like the piece in the door would close that completely off....
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I see what you're saying, Chris. Looks like you would have to remove the refractory to get back there to clean it out, but maybe not.
  4. kuribo

    kuribo Feeling the Heat

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    No, it looks like they have an access door at the rear for cleaning out the area to the side and rear of the refractory burn chamber...
  5. brad068

    brad068 Feeling the Heat

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    If you haven't seen an Atmos boiler check them out. They look to be the same design or maybe the same boiler. They show how to clean out the ashes with there scoop. I was thinking, why don't you guys with EKOs, Get a shallow pan bent up to slide into your secondary chamber floor. That way you could place the center refractory piece on it and when it is time to clean out the ash, pull out the tray, remove refractory, and dump ash.
  6. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    That's a pretty good idea. Presumably the bricks would have to cover the whole plate, or the metal would disintegrate from the heat, right?

    I've seen pictures of the Atmos, and you're right, they look very similar. Other than the shape of the combustion chambers, the BioMax looks a lot like the EKO, too.
  7. brad068

    brad068 Feeling the Heat

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    I'm trying to remember where I seen your pics of the secondary chamber of yours. I don't think you would have to cover the floor with bricks. There isn't any bricks there now is there? All the heat is concentrated into that refractory structure and I don't think the floor would get to hot especially with the water jacket on the backside.
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    The floor is poured refractory cement, as is the door. The bricks just sit on the cement. When it's really rolling, the whole chamber pretty much fills with flame. I might toss a piece of steel plate in there just to see how/if it holds up.

    I'm working on my hx today. I should have some pics to post by tomorrow, after I get it assembled and pressured up. If it works at all, it's going to work great.
  9. leaddog

    leaddog Minister of Fire

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    If you haven't seen an Atmos boiler check them out. They look to be the same design or maybe the same boiler. They show how to clean out the ashes with there scoop. I was thinking, why don't you guys with EKOs, Get a shallow pan bent up to slide into your secondary chamber floor. That way you could place the center refractory piece on it and when it is time to clean out the ash, pull out the tray, remove refractory, and dump ash.[/quote]

    I don't think any metal would hold up very well with the heat and it really isn't necessary. I've only pulled the refratory out once to clean. I have a rake tool that came with it and I just reach back and rake the ashes to the front. I have a pan that sets in front of the door and I rake the ashes into that. If I put the tubulators up I can reach clear back. If you do want to pull the refractory bricks there is a slot on the outside of each one and you use the tool to slide them out. when you are done you slide them back in. I have 4 of them. The smaller ones have less. The whole lower chamber is protected with refractory cement because of the heat, including the door. I think the only time you should need to pull them is when you shut down for the season and clean every thing up. I run mind year around.
    leaddog
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I rake mine with the hoe into a short shovel and then into the can. I have three bricks. The only place I worry about is right behind the last brick. But other than that, as you say, if you can see the bottoms of the turbulators, then you're in good shape. And so far, they're clearly visible in mine.

    In cold weather I probably generate about 5 gallons of ash a week. This morning, for some reason, the ash was really white. I take that to be a good sign. I recently opened up the secondary air ports a bit and am getting less white smoke on startup. I really like this boiler so far. I'd like to upgrade to the new controller, but probably not this heating season. I'm on the verge of getting my tank operational, and I'll probably spend the rest of the winter figuring that out. By next fall, I should be ready to take it up a notch, or 20 degrees, as the case may be.
  11. brad068

    brad068 Feeling the Heat

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    The pics on the top of this form show the refractory pieces sitting on the steel shell. I'm almost certain that the water jacket on these models surround the lower chamber. If you look real close you can see the weld seem deformation about an 1" or 2, concentric to the jacket. I was assuming that the EKOs had a lower water jacket too. My mistake. But if you have seen the Kunzel boiler there doesn't seem to be any refractory in the lower chamber. One thing I do like about the biomax is that it looks like they are using strips of metal acting like cooling fins on a free air cooled engine to extract more heat to the water jacket kind of on the same principle as the Kunzel, below the ash pan. Does any have, or know of anybody that has a Kunzel? I would sure be interested to hear how it works. Them Germans sure are some smart bastards. After all, the only reason the allies won the big one is because we out produced them, not because we were more technologically advanced. They do there homework!
  12. leaddog

    leaddog Minister of Fire

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    there is a water jacket around the eko its just that they put a refactory coating to protect the metal from the intence heat. When it is going good its like a blast furnace and any metal in the direct path would get eaten away. by the time it gets to the hx it has evened out so its not so intence.
    leaddog
  13. rreihart

    rreihart New Member

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    Sorry guys, I was away a couple days. As an early Christmas gift, I took the family to see "The Miracle of Christmas" at the Sight and Sound theater in Lancaster. Extremely well done, and it was great for pushing aside the commercialism and taking time to think about the hows and whys with the birth of Christ.

    So to the original question, as was mentioned the exhaust travels toward the door and then to the left and right through the finned passage way. I have a curved scoop that fits the radius of the refractory pretty well that's used to clean out the ash. I haven't had a lot accumulate there, maybe a gallon in a weeks time. There are access panels in the sides toward the rear, but I haven't opened them yet. This discussion has me wondering what I'll find. I'll check it out in the next couple days.
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