Red Oak Water Fountain

BrotherBart Posted By BrotherBart, Mar 14, 2007 at 10:26 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    32,560
    9,729
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I have been cutting red oaks for thirty years and have never seen any thing quite like this. This tree is a big'un and was blown down fifty feet beside the house as part of the havoc wreaked by a tornado that spun off of Hurricane Ivan and touched down in our yard in 2004. The "yard" is four acres of woods. I have avoided the tree because it fell pointing downhill into a gully and getting those huge red oak rounds up the hill by hand was going to be a killer. Well, a new mid-size saw joined its Poulan cousins today, yep all three Poulans can't stand the color orange and grey is a depressing color, so I decided to break it in on the problem tree.

    The last round I cut is maybe eight or ten feet from the base. When it fell off the cut I looked down and water was pouring, not seeping - pouring, out of the remaining part of the tree base. I have seen wet red oak before but never anything like that. The strange thing is that none of the rounds have even a hint of the classic red oak smell.

    A half hour later and it hasn't slowed down a drop. My well may go dry tomorrow.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. babalu87

    babalu87
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 23, 2005
    1,440
    1
    Loc:
    middleborough, ma.
    Man, thats some good heating once it dries out.
     
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
    Mod Emeritus 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 18, 2005
    5,875
    147
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    IF it ever dries out!
     
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    32,560
    9,729
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    No kidding. Three hours later it has slowed a little bit but still coming. And the weird part is that trees here don't have the classic tap root. The darn roots run out from the base of the tree. Which is why they go down so easily in storms. There is one root somewhere on the bottom of that stump that ain't giving up.

    I have always heard that an oak can take in fifty gallons of water a day. Now I believe it! This thing has been "dead" for three years and the bark is peeling off. Mushrooms on it.
     
  5. DriftWood

    DriftWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Apr 5, 2006
    718
    0
    Loc:
    Bluewater Area, Great Lakes
    Its water logged. I see that in water logged wood on the bottom of the lake, never in a log on the ground.
     
  6. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    32,560
    9,729
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Only parts of this sucker touching the ground were the very bottom of the root ball and then fifty feet away across the ravine down hill from the base.

    Really weird. It is sucking the water out of the ground through a root.
     
  7. Roospike

    Roospike
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 19, 2005
    2,859
    3
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    O' Yeah , That'll be good stuff in a couple of years. Get'er cut up a split .
     
  8. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2006
    5,446
    538
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    It doesn't hurth that red oak is a bunch of straws. You can literally blow through a small piece when it's dry.
     
  9. Jake

    Jake
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 11, 2005
    231
    0
    Loc:
    nw burbs of Chi
    I had a large silver maple die a couple years ago. I cut it down last summer, When I was cutting the trunk, I literally had water spraying all over the place. My first thought was that I somehow broke my saw... Then I realized it was water / sap. and yes, it poured out
     
  10. keyman512us

    keyman512us
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 27, 2007
    804
    0
    Loc:
    North Worc. CTY MA
  11. Corey

    Corey
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 19, 2005
    2,299
    157
    Loc:
    Midwest
    That is interesting. I guess the downhill slope might have helped concentrate the water in the tree? Kind of goes along with my observations on wood drying. A lot of water can move up and down the tree, but not much goes out the bark.

    Corey
     
  12. struggle

    struggle
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 24, 2006
    727
    0
    Loc:
    NW Iowa
    OUt at the farm the owners asked if I would cut some branches off an elm tree. I cut one off and it turned in to a water fountain for a while and then eventually stopped.

    This elm tree they later had a pro come and cut down entirely. They asked me to do it and would pay but I declined as it was to close to thier house. Anyway it was very near thier septic system and I suggested to them that I bet the septic system backs up after they cut the tree down and quits working and about 6 months later they had to have the septic system replaced as that was where that tree was getting all of its water.

    Hey wait a minute I got peeeee'd on by a tree that is total not right :bug:
     
  13. babalu87

    babalu87
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 23, 2005
    1,440
    1
    Loc:
    middleborough, ma.
    FTA

    Thanks for that
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page