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Room not warming up

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by grimrot, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    Not running the stove 24/7 yet. Just about 5 hours at a time. Still kind of learning how to use it.

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  2. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    Hi Sprinter. I haven't had a chance to measure the temp up there yet. When I get home from work I will.
  3. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    You may have to run it quite a while to get everything heated up then maintaining may be easier. I know you had a lot of questions thrown at you and you answered a few but did you insulate and make a block off plate where your liner enters the flue? Not a damper but something you would have to make out of sheet metal and roxul for insulation? If your close to me I can drop off some roxul for you, I'm south of Worcester.
  4. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    Hi Weatherguy - Thanks for the offer. I may inbox you on the roxul. When I get home from work tonight I will post a good picture of the chimney flue.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I suspect a more rapid warm up would happen with a stove with a convection blower in this case. This is assuming that there is already a block-off plate at the damper area. If not, that is the first order of business.

    PS: who is your avatar?
  6. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    Hi Begreen - I ordered the Blower. It's just not installed yet. That's Zacherly the cool ghoul!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Zacherle
  7. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    I think you might be losing a little heat here and there and added all together seems like a lot. First order as BG says is a block off plate. Also, I notice a big difference when I run my ceiling fans in winter mode, most of my heat was trapped in the stove room and the top of the cathedral ceiling, trick was to mix it around more.
    grimrot likes this.
  8. Rickb

    Rickb Minister of Fire

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    I will say with my stove my room stays at 72F-73F with no blower. When I turn my blower on it goes to 77F in short order. But the block off plate is a must.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Ha, that was my first guess but I always saw him in black and white as a kid. This is how I remember him. Funny guy and show.

    zach2.jpg
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
    grimrot likes this.
  10. Brogan007

    Brogan007 Member

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    I've been following this thread...have the same sort of issue. Do I understand this right...if the insert is just sitting in a fireplace, no liner, venting into an open chimney right up to sky...about 12" x 12" , and no plate or block off device....insert heats up to around 500....a lot of heat is being lost up the chimney?
  11. Rickb

    Rickb Minister of Fire

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    Yes.... however not as much as a freestanding stove. And if it is a new reburn stove the lack of draw from the slammer install could be keeping the stove from functioning to full capacity as well.
  12. elmoleaf

    elmoleaf Feeling the Heat

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    Yes, a good point in discussion about block off plate: we're assuming your existing clay lined flue had a smaller size diameter stainless steel flue installed inside when you added the stove. In other words, not a "slammer" install, where the stove pipe is vented up a few feet into the existing flue and then stops.
    We can trouble shoot more once we have some pictures of your stove pipe/stove connection at the firefplace.
  13. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    The floor plan in the room is 800 sqft. The total volume of space you are trying to heat is much much more. Get a bloon with helium in it and weight is so it almost suspends in the air but it still goes up slowly. Let it go by the stove and see where it ends up. Your house has an air flow. Find out what it is and learn how to control it. Example, If I shut my upstairs doors. The cool air coming down my stairs slows down and the heat goes to the other side of the house.
  14. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Minister of Fire

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    Burning some incense will give you a smoke trail to follow air flow easily...
    tsquini likes this.
  15. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Not just a lot of heat but pretty much all of it. That thing would not be much better than an ordinary fireplace. Not to mention it would be really unsafe and probably draft like hell. I imagine the only way such a stove would burn is with the air wide open. If that is your install you should correct it quickly; you are wasting wood and play with the health and safety of your family.
  16. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    OK so I had a chance to shoot some pictures up the chimney. One shows the stove pipe going up the chimney and the other shows the second flue that is not being used.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  17. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    OK thanks for that advice. I will try that.
  18. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    They did not make a block-off plate but stuffed some fiberglass insulation in there; quite common actually. Can you put your hand there and see if you feel cold air coming down? If it is not really noticeable it is probably relatively tight. I would still consider making the block-off plate (see link that BeGreen posted) but I doubt your are losing most of your heat up the chimney. However, check the second damper whether that sits tight. It may be helpful to put some insulation there as right now you only have a metal plate between you and the outside. And metal is a good heat conductor.
  19. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    Hi Grisu - No cold air coming down on either side. I will consider making the block off plate. On those really cold windy nights I am sure there will be some draft there.
  20. grimrot

    grimrot New Member

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    I also wanted to mention that I talked to the retailer today and she mentioned that I may have to run the stove 24/7 to get the house and walls heated up to temp. Does that sound right?
    tsquini likes this.
  21. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

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    I definitely don't have the same issues with cathedral ceiling or windows you have. It sounds a bit excessive. However, I will say that the longer my stove has been running the easier it is to regulate the temperature. I ran the stove for about 36 hours over this past weekend (first time it was cold enough) and I had veterans day off. I had a steady 74-76 degrees all day through multiple burn cycles.
    grimrot likes this.
  22. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Is that wall behind the stove just stone veneer or solid stone? In any case, it will probably eat quite some heat. The dealer may overstate it a little bit but I would also say that with only 5 hours of burning you may just get the place warmed up enough that the oil burner turns off but you don't feel much difference. When you say 5 hours, is that just one quick fire or do you hold the stove above 500 F the entire time? Is there a reload involved? How much wood are you putting in?
  23. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    Yes she is right, you need to heat the mass of the house up. Once it is house will warm up and maintain the heat better. But, 1/3 of you house are windows. To keep your house at 70 with only the stove and not using the furnace is not that bad. If the windows are good, which it sounds like they are. The test is if the temps get down to single digits and you can still maintain the 70 degrees in the house.
    grimrot likes this.
  24. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I was gonna mention that last night but so many things were flying I just let it lay. Everything in the house is soaking up the heat until it get up. Walls, furniture etc.

    One way is to get the place up to temp with the oil burner and let the stove maintain it.
    grimrot likes this.
  25. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Minister of Fire

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    My experience has been that the "house heats up" after about 8 hours or so, 'course, I don't have high ceiling or a wall of glass to deal with, That would be if I was going from something like 68* to maybe 72-73* Taking days to come up to temp sounds excessive to me, unless you have an old stone house or a solid brick home, that'd suck some heat up!
    My question is, if your furnace is keeping the place at 69, what temp would be your comfy goal to shoot for with the wood stove?
    I'm betting that reversing and firing up the ceiling fans is gonna help a lot!

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