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Safe Cutting Technique

Post in 'The Gear' started by kwheat, Sep 14, 2006.

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  1. kwheat

    kwheat New Member

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    I don't mean I want to know how to break into a safe, but rather how to cut that last piece of log into two pieces safely. I can't seem to find a good safe way to do this without the piece trying to come back at me or binding the saw. Anyone come up with a jig or a tried and true method?

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  2. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Hook your dogs into it ........ dont try to cut it with the end or middle of your bar. NOTE: DOGS = bucking/felling spikes in front of your chainsaw where the bar meets the engine.
  3. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    where is that link to that weird choppy thingy atachment for your chainsaw?
  4. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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  5. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    were bored tonite roo. i stil need to get me one of those. but first i need to send you my saw so you can put a hemi in it.
  6. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    "HEMI" lol, good stuff . I have been told by many that little chainsaw buddy attachment works real well when you have a lot of brush to clean up . The price is about right. I might have to give it a shot just to take a look-C . BTW , I agree with bored .........tho how could ya tell ? Does it really show ?
  7. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    since this is almost our virtual chat room, i would say were bored, and alone. At least the threads were adressed for what they asked for before we decided to have conversations about tool sets and chainsaws.
  8. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    True that ...........Wez done good.
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    My Chainsaw Buddy is headed into its second season and I really like the thing. You can whack big ones into little ones with no worry about the log jumping up and biting you or the chain going into the dirt.

    It has its own little saw that it stays attached too these days.
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I always take the spikes off my saws, because all they do is rob you of an inch or more of bar length.

    The safe way to cut a smaller (shorter) piece without any other gear is simply to set it in a place where you can cut all the way through without running your chain into the ground, then begin cutting as far back against the body of the saw as you can. All the force generated by cutting will pull and hold the piece of wood firmly against the saw body as you cut. A variation on this technique is to cut the piece almost all the way through in this way, then roll it over and finish the cut with the tip of the bar. This works well if the piece is big enough and is sitting on the ground. When cutting long lengths lying directly on flat ground, a good way to keep your chain out of the dirt is to make all your cuts 90% of the way through in this way, then roll the log over and finish cutting them with the tip of the bar.

    With a chain saw, you're always ahead to do whatever is necessary to keep the chain from hitting the ground. Get lazy or sloppy, and you pay for it with a dull chain and all the many bad things that follow from that.
  11. kwheat

    kwheat New Member

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    Thanks to all. My biggest problem is not much experience and still a little skeered of the saw. With several hours use today I am getting better.
  12. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    No problem ............ and you should ALWAYS be a little "skeered" of a chainsaw. After many , many years the chainsaw still has my full respect.
  13. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I'll second Roospike's motion. Scared is good.

    What kind of saw do you have? Do you have protective chaps, a helmet and safety boots?
  14. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    Get a timberjack/Dog/Cant/peavey. (there is alot of names for this tool.) These work very well at positioning the logs/ hold them off the ground.
  15. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    Gosh, it seems like I've read that somewhere else. ;-)
  16. twitch

    twitch Member

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  17. FORCE FAB

    FORCE FAB New Member

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    I SAVE ALL THOSE IN A PILE NEAR THE SPLITTER.....PUT EM IN THE THE SPLITTER SIDEWAYS AND USE THE RAM TO "PINCH" THEM.WORKS FOR ME AND IT BEING SIDEWAYS ITS CROSS GRAIN SO IT WONT SPLIT
  18. fire_N_ice

    fire_N_ice Member

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    I had that problem in my sawing buck. What I did was attach a thick black rubber bungie type strap (THD, 36inches long) to the 1 side of the brace that braces the 3 legs. So when needed, bring the bungie up over the saw and the log to the brace on the other side. that holds the log in place. never had it jump or spin with that in place. Hope that helps.
  19. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    One question on that Chainsaw buddy thing... How hard is it to take on and off the saw? Is it a quick 30 second or less task with no tools needed, or is it something that's a lot more involved? It looks like it would be a nice accessory for cutting up small stuff, but looks like it would really be in the way for cutting up big rounds.

    I wouldn't mind something like that if it was a quick on/off item, but if it was a major problem to get on and off then it probably wouldn't be worth the hassle.

    Gooserider
  20. Valtar

    Valtar Member

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    Will it prevet chainsaw kickback? Or will it prevent that you get hit by the chainsw when a kickback happens? And as previous poster asked How big of a round can you cut with it installed?

    Valentin
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