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Sawbuck - Anyone got plans or photos?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by TreePapa, Dec 30, 2008.

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  1. TreePapa

    TreePapa Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
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    Loc:
    Southern Calif.
    If anyone here could post pics or plans (or links to same) for a sawbuck it would be right handy and appreciated. I don't use a chainsaw but when I need to cut lengths I use either a bowsaw or a pull-saw aand a sawbuck to keep the wood at a better height and keep it stable would definitely make cutting easier. And if I ever do get a chainsaw (and the proper PPE to use it), the sawbuck would be helpful then, too.

    Thanks.

    Peace,
    - Sequoia

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  2. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Make up three sets of 2x4 about four feet long. Mark a spot about a foot from the end of each pair, and an inch and three quarters from the edge. Drill a half inch hole through each pair. Bolt each pair together with a half inch thick bolt. Use smaller bolts if thats all you have. Now lay your three setts of legs spaced evenly two feet apart, and nail a piece of fence board or similar to just the left leg of each set near the bottom, oposite end from the bolts.
    Flip the whole rig over and nail a second fence board to the other ste of legs. Be darn sure you don't attach fence boards to the same legs. Stand the unit up, pull the fence boards away from each other and it will open into an X shape. Drill a hole in the center of each fence board large enough to pass a small chain. Adjust to the height wanted, then drop a bolt thru the chain at each end, outside the fence board, to keep the legs from spreading. Will try to upload photo soon.
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    There are lots of different designs on the site, using the search will probably get you a bunch of threads on the topic... A lot depends on what you have for stuff to make it with since sawbucks tend to get a lot of their bits from the scrap pile... Speaking in general, you probably want to put the wood you are cutting around waist height, maybe a bit less - depends on your preferred comfort position. You probably want at least three pairs of uprights, possibly four, though the longer you get the harder it is to move... Spacing between the sets of uprights should be about the same as your desired cut length so that you can use the uprights to mark your cuts.

    Gooserider
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    You might want to build it asymmetrical with the rear uprights taller than the front for ease of loading without comprimising capacity. Also, if you do the classic X you might consider a leaning variation X so that the legs don't get in your way.
  5. kork

    kork New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
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    Southern NJ
    I just built one using some scap 2x4 following a design i saw on the mother earth news website. The whole thing folds up for storage when not in use, it uses an 1 1/4" axis down the center . Pretty neat , works well for my purposes.
    Hank
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Two other design elements that I would suggest...

    1. Try to have room under the cross peice pairs to allow you to stick the bar under the log and upcut in order to finish a cut - I've seen logs that had enough bend to them that they'd close up the kerf about 3/4 through if you tried to cut straight down, being able to upcut the rest of the way saves having to reposition the log.

    2. Try to avoid having metal anywhere in the area where you'll be cutting - if you must, keep it small - i.e. nails, not bolts... If you want to have a bolt as a pivot point, countersink it on both sides and use a short one... Remember that per Murphy, any metal in the cutting area will exert a strong magnetic influence that will attract chainsaw bars....

    Gooserider
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