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Should this stove fit on existing hearth & wall protection?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by ylekyote, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    I want to replace the red stove with an Englander NC-30. I can get it delivered to Home Depot for about $975 with tax. If you have a similar priced stove suggestion that is better please fire it at me. I am still open.

    Please see attached pic of hearth and manual for new stove.
    I have compared it to the size of my old stove. New stove dimensions are:

    24" wide
    31" deep
    30" tall

    My protected surface is 51" from front edge to back corner. The manual says I need 39 by 52" of protected area, but I think that may be a little much. Not sure.

    I have thick stone, with 1" or more open behind it and open at the top (about 1" before it reaches ceiling) and on the sides. My house is stucco on exterior and dry wall interior. Wood floors underneath the stone.

    Hopefully, my 8" Security Chimney will work with whatever I buy, because none of the stoves I can buy have 8" flue.

    Can I install the 30-NC on this hearth without making it larger? I have wood flooring, no carpet. My house is stucco exterior and gypsum interior. If you think I need additional space, what are some options for quick expansion that won't look bad with the stone?

    thanks!
    chris

    Attached Files:

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The problem is that that surface does not appear to be a properly protected surface. It looks like a simple stone veneer. I think you may need to consider it as a regular wall in which case the measurement is to the studs behind the wall.
  3. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    Oh, what is considered protected? I though the stone absorption/blocking properties plus the air gap behind it was the protection? I know some people put metal in their walls, but they have only been people I see without stone on the wall.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The stone protection is relatively small. It's hard to tell the protection from the photo. Is there a 1" air gap behind the stone wall that is ventilated top and bottom for each wall? If yes, then it could be an NFPA 211 protected wall.
  5. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    Yes. All that.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Then you likely have a properly protected wall and can use the protected wall clearances. Sorry for the confusion, somethings don't show up in pics unless they are specifically photographed.
  7. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Englander requires R1.5 for the hearth. I don't think stone on wood is gonna make that.
  8. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    Well, I will ask the previous owner about it and see if he installed something in the wall behind the stone. From what I read in manuals it doesn't matter much about the bottom, because most of the heat is from top and sides. My VC cast iron doesn't get hot underneath hardly at all. Thanks!
  9. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Many stoves require only a non-combustible surface underneath. The NC30 requires R1.5 for the hearth. This is determined in testing for UL certification.

    Codes are written for your, and your family's, safety. What you choose to do is up to you, your local inspector, and your insurance company.
  10. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    I wonder if there is a way to test my material? It should be fairly resistant, because it is 3/4" think stones (or thicker) and put on cement on the wire, 1" away from the drywall. The whole thickness and space from the drywall is at least 2.25" of material and air.
  11. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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  12. ylekyote

    ylekyote New Member

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    The base is 2.25 to 2.75" thick, layered as such from bottom to top: cement board, mortar, river granite/rocks. It seems not to get hot when I fired up the Vermont Castings stove
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If there is a 1" ventilated top and bottom gap between the backer board of the wall shield and the actual wall it doesn't matter what is behind it. As long as no combustibles were used in the building of wall shield you are ok. If however it is furred out on wood strips, then that becomes the nearest combustible. Make sense?

    It's not safe to assume it will be cool under or just as importantly, in front of the stove. You need to know how the hearth was built if the stove needs more than just ember protection. The hearth requirements can vary radically between different stoves Take a look at the Hearthstone Homestead's hefty hearth requirements for instance.

    Here's an example of a "protected" floor that wasn't protected very well. This is after the hearth pad was removed.

    BurntFloor.JPG

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