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siding update

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by begreen, May 1, 2007.

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  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I've met a couple contractors now. At this point the consensus is that it would be less expensive to redo the whole house siding, then repair existing. It sounds like we're looking at cedar shingles with either Tyvek or tar paper weather barrier. If we go with shingles, what amount should be exposed to weather? One third? The contractors are trying to be competitive, but I want the longest lasting job. What exposure - 5", 6"? What should I ask for in nails used? What range of prices are we looking at for a 2 story, 17+ square shingle job?

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  2. titan

    titan Minister of Fire

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    BG, I've done a bit of cedar shingling and used both brass and galvanized round-headed nails.The brass ones cost more but they oughta last forever and they can't bleed rust onto your shingle face.They look sharp too.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Since the shingles are 16" 5" to 5.5 assures triple coverage no this is the normal exposure range. as for nails most are covered. Many use staples in air guns also perfectly aceptable
    I use galv finish for face exposed nailing. The last shingles I used were pre stained on Strips twice as fast in installation. they were stained in bleaching oil and turned natural grey

    Malbec was the manufacturer

    Be green since I'm not a Diy should I participate in this forum?

    Actually exposure should be figured so that the rows match the window bottoms and topss
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Elk, you and any Hearth.net contracting pro should definitely participate here. Your experience, Sandor's Hogwild's, etc. is priceless. I hope to help out where I can but am stronger in mechanicals.

    I haven't heard of bleaching oil. Will see what I can find out about it. I've read about the strip shinglesand how they are faster to put up. How was the quality?
  5. restorer

    restorer New Member

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    You really think you can get out of participating with that excuse? Suck it up and give a hand. You don't have to be one to add to the discussion, just have an interest. Besides, you help because you have to, it's part of your charisma. :-S
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Although I am finding a whole lot of info on the Malbec grape and wines (one of my favorites), I am not finding anything but a few articles mentioning Malbec shingles. Are they a strictly east coast product?

    - Edit , never mind. I found them It's Maibec. They are eastern white cedar shingles. I'll be using western red cedar, old growth if at all possible.
  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    In general strip or pannel shingles actually fly when installing. The grade quality is the top great quality bleaching oil for white cedar turns it like cape cod grey

    pre stained means every shingle is dipped so weather protection is on all sides. They cost more but eliminate staining

    I also find thar air gun staples are a good way to fasten them and staples are cheaper than nails and hold as good or better
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I found an article in This Old House where they used bleaching oil on red cedar as well with good results. I'll check into it. It looks like some bleaching oils also have a fungicide in them. That would be good for our climate. If we go with single shingles, what's the best way to apply the bleaching oil? Do you dip them before putting them up or apply it after they are up?
  9. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    ELk's right, the nails used to put on the cedar should be covered by the next layer. Any nails at top etc that are going to show....I suggest S.S. nails.
    They are more expensive, but will not leave rust, oxidation streaks down your cedar over time. I am not familiar with the labor rates out west, and its been a while since I retired from roofing & siding. For 2 story 17+ sq. I am guessing in the the estimates will roll in low from $6,900.00 to high of $8,900.00.
    Not sure what a square of cedar is going for these days. I always did machine & hand splits. Slow tedious hand nailing process. We also used 30 lb. felt between courses.
    Elk also hit in on the head about triple coverage. I would settle for no less myself. Make sure they leave a space about a thumbnail thickness between the nail heads & the cedar. It needs this space to expand & contract. Otherwise if they are tight, they will expand & split at some of the tight nails. Remember, cedar expands alot when moist & wet. But also contracts back when dry. It moves alot. Too tight, makes for breaks & cracks.
    Disclaimer: these views and thoughts are not necessarily the views & thoughts of hearth.com, these are my own personal experiences while employed in the trade.
    Have a nice day :)
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