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So what do you wear.

Post in 'The Gear' started by DavidV, Dec 12, 2005.

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  1. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

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    We spend lots of words in this here talking about what we should be wearing(chaps, etc) but what do you really wear when you are processing your firewood?
    For me summer is jeans and an old brown army t-shirt and combat boots. Winter is the same thing with a wolverine quilted flannel shirt/coat andd if it's really cold a sweatshirt inbetween. This winter is a change. I have some insulated work boots for cold weather. hearing protection and leather gloves are always worn.

    Davivd

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  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    never had chaps unless wrestling and roping Steers I supose I sould use my goalie mask. You mean I should not be wearing flip flops, Ear protection what's that you said.
    All kidding aside I wear ear protection unlsee it is convient not to hear my wife Bit --- Work boots steel toes and goggles Most of the time I am using an electric chain saw just for the final processing.

    My Stihl Farm Boss 041 is a live well and cutting as the day I got it. What I like about it, not today's cheaper production model made in West Germany. ( no plastic) Lots of torx but not the speed or rpms more modern saws have now, If it would only die, I would replace it with an inertial break model. This saw has cut over 100 house lots and been party to clearing about 10 miles of roads. I mean it has been worked. But it cuts and cuts un beliveable how well it cuts for its age and abuse it has taken. I know guys still cutting with these saws with 28" blades. Many others still carry it for backup. I am not recomending it for the novice. It takes a large degree of respect and knowing the dangers to use a saw like this. Plus knowing what one is doing and experience.
    Heed Eric's word about the break. If I were still clearing lots and falling trees I would have a few saws with them. Most of the trees I cut up I have pushed over with the Backhoe or scavagened wood lengths I can pick up. Not heavy duty cutting anymore
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    When I'm using a chain saw, I always wear all the gear, which is to say Kevlar chaps, full head protection helmet and kevlar-lined logging boots.

    When I'm splitting firewood, it's usually jeans or shorts and sneakers. And maybe a shirt.
  4. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    The hearing protection is a double edge sword. Go deaf or risk hearing a sound that could make you react to a life saving manuever.
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Well, if you don't wear it and you go deaf, then you won't hear it anyway.
  6. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Not to mention, how do you hear anything over the roar of the saw? Muffs on a hardhat are best. When the saw goes off, they go up.
  7. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    I wear Husky chaps, heavy duty Meindl hiking boots, tight shirt and coat, safety goggles and ear plugs. I am saving up for the stihl hardhat with ear muffs. Oh, and I also have the chainsaw proof gloves (Husky fron Europe). It all works fine. My main concern is stopping when I get tired. The how-to-cut-wood-safely manual I got from my logging supplier really 'trained' me what to do and not to do. And the most important thing is to NOT BE TIRED and use your head when you use a chainsaw. So that is what I do.

    Carpniels
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I agree. The not working when you're tired part is critical. Probably the most important factor, IMO. That and wearing the right personal protective gear.

    I don't know if you've ever been to the Woodsmen's Field Days up in Boonville, carpniels, but that's a good place to stock up on everything related to chainsaws and woodcutting. For me it's an annual event. I save up my nickels and dimes all year long and blow it all at Boonville.
  9. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    I only cut one, maybe two, cords of wood each year. I barrow a chain saw as I have trouble justifying buying one for as little as one cord of wood per year. One of the benefits of living close to the brother-in-law. No chaps for same reason. However...

    I wear blue jeans and steel toed rubber boots. Leather is probably better, but I suspect a chain would cut through either. The steel toe, at least, protects my toes from heavy falling objects.

    I wear shooter's electronic muffs (Peltor--they have stereo amplifiers so I can still hear when the big sounds aren't being 'clamped' out). A long sleeve shirt, down vest, leather gloves, safety glasses, and maybe a 'gimme cap', top off my ensemble.
  10. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi Eric,

    I live in Rome, NY and Boonville is only 20 miles away. So, yes, I went to the woodsmen's days this year for the first time (I am getting more serious about cutting so that is the place to go). Little did I know that it is an all cash business. So I saw all these goodies I need (want, according to my wife :) and I couldn't buy a single thing. What a bummer.

    I will be buying the helmet there next year. And a raker file. After that, I should be all set for a while. I stocked up on bar oil and 2 cycle oil a while ago, so I am good with that.

    Carpniels
  11. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    I carry a scar on the outside of my left knee cap from a 10 stiches gash I gave myself 4 years ago when I was clearing my house lot. I was damn lucky I didn't mutilate my knee. I now wear chaps, ear muffs and safety goggles. By the way I posted a question yesterday about hints for cutting a big ol' Ash trunk. I screwed up my courage this afternoon and went out and kicked it's A**. I was able to cut a section out of the middle and after that worked my way up to the ends. Thanks to all for the shot of confidence you gave me!
  12. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    Downeast, Sounds like you've had some good training. I'm jealous, and could definitely use some of the same. OCS? Not Navy are you? Retired submariner here. This is our 2nd season with the Oslo and I am happy with it. The side loading door is nice, especially because the front door spills ash onto the front tray every time it is opened, so the only time I open the front door is for periodic cleaning. I find the stove likes to run between 500 and 650 degrees. I bank the fire at bedtime (10:30 or 11:00) and put airflow at 1/4 open. In the morning ( 6:00) there is always a healthy bed of coals and the surface temp is around 300 degrees. I've been burning mixed hardwood, mostly oak, elm, hickory and ash. I like the size of the firebox, it will take pretty big splits, It will take 20" lengths, but I cut mine to 18" for ease of loading All my wood was cut and processed last spring. I think it is dried just right, never hisses or pops. I've only turned my oil furnace on 2 nights this year, the stove has handled pretty much all my heating needs. My avatar is my house, about 2300sf. Stove is located in the family/living room which is open to the 2nd floor via a loft, and the kitchen is located off the family room so heat seems to distribute itself pretty efficiently.
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