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  1. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    So im splitting some Ash up to 7-9 inches thick by 16 -18 long; this stuff looks huge compared to the toothpicks i was burning last year. The question is will these splits be too big for a 2.3 cf firbox the Osburn 2000 insert offers? Im going from a 1.3 cf firebox to the 2.3 because thats as big as my fireplace will handle, just want to make sure Im not cutting too big. Thanks for all the help from you veteran wood burners out there this site rocks.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That is about the biggest size I split for the T6 (3 cu ft). Maybe set the top limit of 8" for the 2000? I would be sure I also had a good percentage of 4-6" splits.
  3. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Just learning, and learning... not sure what is meant by "up to 7-9 inches thick"... can I relate this to rounds that are 7" to 9" in diameter? No, I think not, I never burn a round bigger than say 4". Is the subject inches thick referring to the length of the "pie" shaped split or is this a rectangular size?

    I simply follow the size my q-fire will take, up to about 19" E/W. I think it is wider than deep, I could have this backwards. I usually load N/S and it will take 18". I know if I put a well seasoned hunk of hard wood, roughly 8 or 9 inches on a side cross section, and do not load the box full, a couple of the hunks put into a hot fire bed will keep the insert running for a good 8 hours, here I mean the automatic thermostat is still holding the fan on...the fire box has nothing but hot coals at this point.

    I have never tried to fill the volume of the fire box, but assume if I did so with subject well seasoned hardwood it would run for at least 10 hours... don't know I've never tried as my geoghermal heat pump is economical to run and I set it to cut on when the room with the insert drops below 60 degrees on cold nights. We haven't seen a lot of cold nights this year, but we are forecast to see 24 degrees tonight, I may crank up the o'l insert again to night, depending on how fast the temperature drops, it is still about 45 degrees at 5:30 PM.

    Sorry if this doesn't add any useful information, but I wanted to make my first post on the new web architecture. I had to ask for a password as the transition seems to have invalidated my past one. I used the password/email facility to gain a new password and to reset the password back to my old one.

    Happy Spring.
  4. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Picture 016.jpg Picture 016.jpg Picture 017.jpg
    These are the splits Im talking about I have a ton of four inch splits and smaller
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I like to be able to put at least 2 splits,side by side, N/S loaded. Not sure you will be able to do that in the 2000 and they would have to be E/W if 18" long. If there's not a lot that size, I'd resplit them. It's a giant pain to load a hot stove with a split that just won't fit.
    mfglickman likes this.
  6. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Im trying to overcome the quick burn that my little 1.3 has made me grown acustom to. Maybe the 2.3 of the 2000 will fix that for me just because of its size. I have been told " if you want a longer burn get a bigger firebox and burn bigger splits" So tired of filling that firebox every two hours to keep the stove temp up. Jumping track I was at Menards poking aroung the Drolet insert they carry and I noticed on the top of their baffle where the secondaries are they had the top lined with some type of insulation and fire brick and I can see where that would hold heat for a longer time compared to mine that has no top firebricks or insulation.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The Osburn 2000 should have a c-cast baffle with an insulation blanket on top sitting above the burn tubes.
  8. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    We have the c cast baffle in our furnace, if it is c cast you won't have a blanket. Its insulation value is very high. I know our firebox is 3.5 cuft and we don't split our wood that big. When we upgraded, I burned wood that was processed for the old furnace. The next year everything was split down to avoid the loading headaches. We didn't require monster splits for an overnight burn.
  9. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Ok so by the pics I should cut those splits in half and call it good?
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    FWIW, the manual shows an insulation blanket on top with a weight on the blanket.
  11. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, your right. It shows a vermiculite baffle along with the insulation and weight. C-cast is a different material, our baffle is quite thick compared to some of the insulation boards and very durable.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I think the stand alone shows vermiculite but the insert shows c-cast + blanket. Not sure why the extra insulation there.
  13. dafattkidd

    dafattkidd Minister of Fire

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    Etiger, if you have to resplit your splits I recommend using a tire. It is a great method for splitting splits. Get a car tire. Put it on the ground. Load the tire with splits. Split the splits with a maul. Empty that fridge of some of those beers.
  14. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    I would split the 10's but keep some 7-8 inches, just make sure you have a variety to fill in. I usually cut a lot in the 5-6 inch range with some smaller and an equal amount larger. The frigid nights I put a couple 7-8 ins on the bottom then fill the box with some med and small splits.
  15. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    It is much easier to make those large splits smaller than to glue them back together. I have been burned before by having splits too small and also with that comes the time wasted with the extra splitting. I tend to split large now but still not as large as those you have pictured.

    The standard way people discuss split size is by describing the smallest dimension. So a 6" split is 6" across the center at the smallest point.

    I shoot for a 6" split which is easy to remember since it is about the size that can be easily picked up with one hand.
    kettensäge likes this.
  16. chuckie5fingers

    chuckie5fingers Member

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    My firebox is 1.85 c.f. I would split those monsters at least in half. Save some biguns for the really cold nights however.
    Just my 2 cents. :p
    have fun,
    chuck
  17. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Fattkidd the beer will be emptied lol. I did cut most of them down in size. Im leaving them eight inches in diamiter no bigger. I want some bigger splits to go with the bigger fire box. I have probably 8 cords of small stuff and medium stuff to go with it. Picture 018.jpg The stuff to the right behind the tree is big stuff the rest is small to medium, thats two rows deep also.
  18. dafattkidd

    dafattkidd Minister of Fire

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    Then you're in great shape. You've got a good mix and a ton of wood. It looks really good.

    I love the tire trick. Its a good way to split smaller stuff. I almost always have a tire around when I'm splitting wood.
  19. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

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    Split size.....hmmmm....I think that depends on the size of your fire box and your burning habits. Everyone is going to be a little different. Me, small fire box on both my stoves, so I split small. But I am old, and don't sleep much, and love tending my fires. That's why I don't have a BK :)
  20. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Old non-epa stoves tend to be much more tolerant of the larger splits. So often we get first time EPA burners on here having problems with wet wood and large splits, the smoke dragons chowed on it but the EPA stoves are more sensitive.
  21. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    That is a mix of Ash, Red Oak, Black Walnut, Black Locust, Cherry, and Hickory Red Oak being my favorite to burn.
  22. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    I've got a chitload of red oak going on 3 years old ,what do you like about it,as i haven't burned any.By the way you've got a cadillac supply of natures finest to burn when the time comes,gives ya a good feeling just lookin at it.
  23. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    etiger, it is not bad to have some splits of that size but I would not want too many and the reason is the firebox size. We have a 2 cf firebox and for night burning or if we are to be away from home for all day, I like to put in one large split like yours or even a round. I place that in the bottom rear of the firebox and then fill in with smaller splits. That large one will help to hold the fire for a longer period of time.
  24. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I think you really need to keep a good mix of small, medium and large splits. After you learn what the stove likes you can go from there.
  25. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    If you've never burned red oak your gonna love it, last year was my first year burning red oak and it gets much hotter and the burn lasts much longer, also oak coals nicely for your next refill. 2012-12 and 13-14 I have 3 cords each year to burn, its it a mild winter like this past year I may save it though.

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