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Stihl 034 AV - time for some service

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jim K in PA, Jul 2, 2008.

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  1. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Minister of Fire

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    I have a c.1990 034 that has seen pretty light use over the last 18 years. I am still running the original chain (as well as everyhting else). Hand sharpening has kept it useful, and I am just getting to the point where the file nicks the top of the link. I use the Stihl file jig for depth and angle. It has a 20" bar. I will probably replace the chain soon, as I am now moving to a wood gasser for heat (GARN) and have started stockpiling wood.

    Anyway - I am having a problem lately with cold starts and stalling after a hard run. After a heavy cut, if I just let go of the throttle, it will die, and is hard to restart, almost like it is out of fuel. After a few false starts, it will run and idle fine. I suspect the fuel line and pickup need to be replaced. Is this something I can source and replace myself? I see no reason why not, but just thought I would ask before charging in (like I usually do . . . :roll: ) My local Stihl dealer/service shop is good, but they are usually backlogged for a week or more at a time, and I would rather not lose my saw for a few weeks if I can do the job myself in an afternoon.

    Thanks for any help.

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  2. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Take the top off and blow it out with compressed air around the carborator ...replace with new gas, remove the air filter and blow that out to...well hell after all this time just replace the air filter. You may have to adjust the idle just consult the manual. Incredible your still on the original chain. Hope that helps. also fish out the fuel filter in the gas tank...unscrew it clean it out.
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Might need a new plug as well... Other things I've heard of is the various rubber lines getting old and brittle - sometimes cracking and developing leaks, etc.... I would say give it the quick stuff mentioned, then if that doesn't solve the problem, take it into the shop for some TLC on all the rubber bits - it may need some due to the age of the saw, as opposed to just use...

    Gooserider
  4. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the tips guys. I have been doing basic maintenance like cleaning the air filter, but that is about it. It really has NEVER given me a problem before! It is the original spark plug. The gas is fresh, as I have been using it a lot lately. I'll pull the fuel filter out and check that.
  5. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    One thing I've always done with all by gas powered equipment was to store them full of gas so the rubber lines and gaskets stayed wet and lubricated. If they sat for awhile I'd remove the old gas and replace with fresh gas and have had good results over the years doing this.

    Back a few years ago got my Husky stuck in a downed tree...went back to the house for a Stihl 041 I got in the late 70's that hasn't been used in about 4 years when I topped a roll of cedar trees. Replaced the old stale gas and after 6-8 pulls I was in business. After I exercised it limbing for awhile it was starting at the 1st pull when warmed. It's still my reserve saw...I'd like to upgrade but I keep talking myself out of it.
  6. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Minister of Fire

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    Well, apparently it was a little TOO long since my last maintenance routine on the 034. The dang carb was invisible below the sawdust/oil sludge encasing it and all the controls. I blasted it all away with carb cleaner, as well as the air filter which was just as obstructed. I used some electrical grease on the linkages, but the choke rod does not keep the choke closed all the way. I need to tweak that some. I also pulled the spark arrestor screen from the muffler. That was about 25% obstructed.

    It seems to run much better now, but I will have to go put a load on it to be sure.

    Oh - the fuel pickup and hose are in fine shape - no cracks or holes visible.

    Thanks again for the tips.

    PS - I also store equipment with full tanks for the same reason, with the same results.
  7. Chris S

    Chris S New Member

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    I read somewhere that the newer gas ( with ethanol) should not be left in the fuel tank for months- don't remember the technical reason why.
  8. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    On my saw when the air filter gets dirty it doesn't run worth a darn. Also it will smoke pretty bad.
    I don't store mine any certain way but I'm also using it every couple of weeks.
  9. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    I have been thru a bar and probably 6 chains on my 029! Either you need to cut more wood or I need to cut less!!! And I do not cut as much as a lot of the guys here!!!
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    In theory the ethanol can absorb water from the atmosphere, which will cause it to come out of solution with the gas and fall to the bottom of the tank - thus giving the engine a straight slug of ethanol when you fire up... On a 4-stroke engine this might just cause a moment or two of bad running, but in a two-stroke, it also means no lubrication from the two-stroke oil in the fuel either...

    I've heard multiple sources that suggest it is best to totally avoid ethanol as much as possible, with the lowest %ages of ethanol being found in the premium grades from name brand gas stations.... More expensive, but given how long a gallon of gas lasts in a saw, not all that big a deal...

    The other thing I've ALWAYS seen in every long term storage advice instruction that I've seen outside this thread has been to drain the carb or run it dry, and empty the gas tank... Stabilizer helps, but even stabilized gas turns to varnish and crap over time, leaving residue in the tank, fuel lines and especially carb... When I used to work at a bike shop, one of our MAJOR income streams every spring was cleaning carbs on bikes stored for the winter with fuel in them...

    My new Dolmar even says to drain the oil tank and if normally using veggy base bar oil, to run some dino-base oil through the saw before storing it - otherwise the veggy base can turn to gum and clog the oil system.

    ART
  11. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Minister of Fire

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    :lol: burntime. I have used it sparingly over the years, and take good care of the chain. It will be used A LOT more now that the GARN is going to be our source of heat for the forseeable future.
  12. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Minister of Fire

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    :coolsmile:

    All it needed was a little TLC. I cleaned the carb and removed the spark screen, sharpened the chain, and it ripped through some 18" EWP logs yesterday like a hot knife through butter. Chips were long and flying!

    It usually is the easy stuff. Unless the maxi-spring brake can decided to blow out as you head off with a full load of logs in your truck. Grrr.
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