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  1. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,359
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I swear my 1993 Jotul Firelight 12 must sing more than most, particularly since I re-gasketed the doors and glass. Plenty of pinging on the way up and down, to tell me exactly what she's doing. That's all good.

    But what really gives me the heebie jeebies is the low roar the stove makes on a big load of wood. Being a downdraft stove, I need to get her going pretty good before I engage the cat. The following hour, particularly if loading a bunch of smaller branchwood as I did tonight, is sometimes a little to "musical" for my liking. Sounds like a jet engine roaring in or around my stove.

    No, it's not a chimney fire... running on a brand-new insulated stainless liner right now. But, when I hear the roar start, I know I'm in for a bumpy ride... turn down too far, and back-puffing will commence. Sometimes violently. Open up the air too wide, and stove goes into overfire mode. In all cases, it's on a big load of wood, most often a bunch of small branchwood. Unfortunately, I'm burning a lot of small stuff, while the bigger stuff seasons another year.

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  2. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Messages:
    749
    Loc:
    Meadow Valley, CA
    What are the exact temps when the roar hits?
  3. tobaccogrower

    tobaccogrower Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    104
    Loc:
    Suffield Ct
    my dutchwest neverburn made that noise. scared the CHIT out of me somtimes. if it was really windy and cold it would really roar! stayed up alot later then normal handful of times worried for our safety. i'm sooo glad that stove burnt out and i was forced to get another stove!
  4. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,359
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Good question. 550'ish, I think, but I'll have to pay better attention next time. Had the stove as high as 650F last night, which is hotter than I normally allow, walking the fine line between backpuffing and the stove taking off.

    Edit: just loaded two medium and one large split, and let the stove top go to 650, waiting for the roar... never happened. Seems it only happens on a very full stove. Also, 660 is quite manageable on a smaller load, whereas I have a heck of a time bringing a big load down from that temp without the dreaded back puffing. I think my answer is bigger splits for bigger loads, a luxury I cannot yet afford... just got started last year, and a big part of what I collected this time last year was oak.
  5. Dunragit

    Dunragit Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Messages:
    92
    Loc:
    OK
    My stove pings all the time, generaly when it is heating up fast or cooling down fast.
  6. Pierre902

    Pierre902 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Western MA
    On a cold start up I also notice what sounds like stuff falling down my stainless 6" liner. My guess is it is the metal expanding and contracting and maybe some byproduct is flaking off. I think it will be time to check the liner soon to see if I've built up any creaosote. After only 4 weeks of burning I'd be surprised.

    I've haven't experienced the roar you mentioned.
  7. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,359
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Added a new observation to my last post above. Trust me, you would not miss this roar! Very low rumble, not particularly loud, but menacing.
  8. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,920
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    Big splits on a not too big coal bed results in very controllable fires, no matter how large the load. Roaring fire can be easily and safely dialed down without backpuffing. Large load of smaller splits really ought to be loaded only on a small coal bed (at least in my stove). Big splits on a large coal bed, you have to be very careful to engage the cat at the earliest opportunity, and dial the air way down at about the same time, or you get a really hot fire very fast.
  9. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,541
    Loc:
    Long Island NY
    +1. Large load of small splits or branch wood is tough to control. Maybe throw a large split in even if it's not as seasoned as you would like just to keep the peace.
  10. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,322
    Loc:
    Holliston, MA USA
    +2 I have the most problem when I try to pack every cubic inch of the stove by packing lots of small pieces around the bigger ones to fill the box. Those loads take a long time to light off then the entire thing starts off gassing like mad and potentially over fires the cat. If I have the discipline to carefully select big pieces for the night load and fill it without worrying about max capacity I am rewarded with a more controllable burn that will settle in faster to a lower cat temp and burn longer... If not necessarilygive the max possible btus

    I have a couple times heard the roar, but both cases were catalyst over fire situations... In normal operation I hear all kind of pinging as the plates of the stove and the flue expand and contract...totally normal.
  11. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,218
    Loc:
    Soutwest VA
    My stove pings cause of heating cooling.
  12. Applejacks

    Applejacks Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Northeast NY
    I have a Vermont castings with the non cat everburn system. The roar you mentioned was a bit of a surprise to me as well. II have found, however, that it greatly subsides in a rather short period of time. It remains but is much less audible. I have found that the sound gives me a big cue as to my timing of the shutdown----if there is no rumble, It tells me that I have shut down too early and have to wait until the temp rises a few more degrees. I am in NY about 20 miles from the Canadian border and have no problem with overnight burns even on the coldest night as long as I load fully load the stove
  13. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,359
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Well, the wind is howling like a freight train outside tonight, and the stove is about 2/3 full, with no sign of any trouble tonight. I didn't have any good "big" splits to load, so I'm running the biggest stuff I could find near the top of my pile. The steamer pot full of water on top is really making a big difference, too! Really keeps the stove top temp down, which in turn keeps my lintel temp down. The wood door jamb over the stove is my primary concern when it gets too hot, for which I will be fabricating a new heat shield in the next week or two, but in the mean time the steamer really makes a huge difference in keeping that wood from getting as warm.

    Edit: I spoke too soon. Back puffing has begun. One was violent enough to move the top load door (with steamer), and shoot ash off the ash lip from exhaust shooting out the air control lever hole. Wife is frustrated, and so am I, although only one of us is ready to scrap this whole wood stove thing. Will be sitting up watching this dang stove.... again.

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