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Stove top cooking

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by michael, Jan 30, 2006.

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  1. michael

    michael New Member

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    I tryed cooking pancakes today with my Avalon Mission stove. What a failure! I realize that it's a convection stove, but I thought I could at least fix pancakes!!!

    What temperature does the stove top get on stoves that have "cook surfaces"? For that matter, what temperature is my electric range top at when set on medium?

    I guess in an emergency I could disconnect the connector pipe and remove the convection top.

    We love our stove, but after today I realize it has limitations. Next time we're buying one with a cook top.

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  2. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    "Cook top" is also a subjective term. The heat shield on the top front of my insert is called a cook top in the manual. Must be one of those translation problems of buying a stove made in Quebec.

    It would be sort of cool having a real wood burning cook stove though. My kitchen just isn't big enough for one.
  3. joshuaviktor

    joshuaviktor New Member

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    Electric rangetop uses resistance heating to make coils of steel red-hot. Steel remains black up to approx 1000 degrees fahrenheit. It is red up to 1400 degrees.

    It ain't cold, people.

    JOshua
  4. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    You've got several things coming into play here. Like Joshua says, a kitchen burner is ~1400 F when it is glowing bright cherry red, but you don't need to get that hot to cook. The kitchen stove is throwing out a lot of heat to make up for relatively poor conduction between the burner and the pan. I would suspect that cooking golden brown pancakes is going to take an actual "griddle temperature" of around 300-350F minimum. Even with the convection stove, the top surface is likely to get well up to that range, but the problem is going to be heat conduction into the pan will be very slow - and so will the cooking.

    I'm guessing your stove has some type of "double wall" that prevents the pan from going directly onto the stove surface. If so true cooking may be out of the capability of the stove as it just won't transfer enough heat. It may be limited to the warming / slow baking role.

    If you are going to try full on cooking, some pointers would be - have a good hot fire, turn off any blowers if it is acceptable for your stove design, find a pan with a flat bottom that makes good contact with the stove surface for maximum heat conduction, cook close to the very center of the stove as that is where the maximum heat should be, use a lid if possible to trap heat in the pan. If you are really "roughing it" you could try cooking on a heavy piece of aluminum foil as that will mold itself to the surface of the stove and allow maximum heat transfer, although it will be pretty tedious...don't stab a hole in your "pan"!!

    Good Luck,
    Corey
  5. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Just as a reference, when cooking pancakes in an electric frying pan that I have, I routinely set it to 250 degrees F which results in pretty well browned cakes
  6. Homefire

    Homefire New Member

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    Thats right the cheapo $14.00 electric frypan gets it right. We always use one while on the road. They are great for a quick warn up of leftovers and make wonderful grilled cheese and tomato soup.

    Breakfast at the Cracker Barrel for 2 , 20 bucks with tip.
    Eggs toast and ham in your room .... less than 10 bucks for the whole weekend. ;)
  7. homebrewz

    homebrewz Minister of Fire

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    You can always do the campfire thing, depending on what type of stove you have, and bake your potatoes, in the stove, wrapped in tin foil. However, I wouldn't do this too often for fear of leaching aluminum ions into certain foods.

    My oven died last winter and I would occasionally do this with potatoes, and certain types of meat. I've also used the stove top for roasting pumpkin seeds and use it daily for keeping my coffee/tea warm.

    homebrewz
  8. pgmr

    pgmr Feeling the Heat

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    Does your stove have a blower? Was it on during the pancake fiasco? If so, turning off the blower should allow the "upper" top to get hot enough to cook.
  9. michael

    michael New Member

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    Thanks for all of the responses!

    I guess I didn't give enough info from the get go, so here's some more: I have an Avalon Mission stove, which is a medium sized convection stove (a steel box within a box for simplicities sake). I was using a cast iron, Lodge brand pan. My stove front thermometer read about 425* when I placed the pan on the stove. I let it warm up for about 10 minutes before starting my pancakes. After about 10 minutes I tried to flip the first one and was surprised to find that it just smeared. I let it go for another 5-8 before finally giving up and heading for the electric range. I make pancakes in this pan all the time, so it wasn't the operator ;)

    Maybe I need to allow much more time for stove top cooking as one person mentioned.

    I did some checking Dylan, and I can't find the electric range burner temps anywhere. I guess most consumers have no use for such trivial data.
  10. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    it takes longer then 10 minutes for my lodge cast iron griddle to heat up on my range! give it 20 next time.
    I like to brew my beer wort on the top of my stove. Great surface area so you dont burn it.
    Ryan
  11. homebrewz

    homebrewz Minister of Fire

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    Haven't done wort yet, just food. Don't know if I could get the stove hot enough to keep it boiling. I use propane and a cajun cooker for that!
    homebrewz
  12. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    i have one of those too, its just to cold this time of year, the stove will keep it boiling for as long as you like, it just takes longer to get there. I would swear it tastes better :D
  13. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    I'd sure hate to have a boil over!!!! Your really get enough heat? I use a 130k jet burner to do my beer. I like water to boil fast!!!
  14. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    It takes about 45 minutes on the stove. I have a outside cooker too, but you will freeze your butt off this time a year making wort. I just add the hops slowly to make shure it doesnt boil over. I have only done it 3 times and so far so good.
  15. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi Mike,

    Remember, they don't have cast iron evaporators on the stoves for nothing. Ofcourse the stove top gets hot enough to cook. I used it exclusively when the power was out last december for 5 days.

    It takes a little more time and I actually eliminated the pan. I made steak on the cast iron top of my stove. Just sprinkle some seasalt and you are good to go. Smells wonderful. I bet pancakes would work too, but I do not have a flat top stove anymore so I cannot try that.

    But yes, if you use your castiron pan and let it sit on there long enough (put a tiny bit of water in it to see when the pan reaches 220F when it evaporates) and then cook. Should work fine.

    Carpniels
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