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Summer Wood Cutting!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by bartlett920, Jul 9, 2008.

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  1. bartlett920

    bartlett920 New Member

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    I like cutting wood in the summer I would rather be deer hunting or sitting by the stove in the winter the only downfall to summer cutting is the poison ivy,oak, and sumac crawling up my dead trees. Anyway forget about that just bi@#***chin!!!!!!!! I have heard that if you drop a tree in the summer and let it set a week or so the leaves will pull the sap out of the tree thus stopping the rapid dulling of chains. Does this work? THe reason I ask is I have about 5 hedge trees I need to drop and cut up so that I can have a clear path to some of my other seasoned wood and having chains sharpened at $6 bucks a piece will get old in a hurry!!

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  2. FatttFire

    FatttFire Member

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    Just to help you out with part of your answer! I bought a bench top sharpener from Norther tool, and after initaley settting it up dialing it in to proper angle and such, it is a breeze, worth every dime I spent on it. Takes 5 minutes to sharpen a chain!
  3. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    The drier the wood the more it will dull your chain. Buck it up green.
  4. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    Leaving it lay with the leaves on will help it season faster but I doubt it would help your chains. If anything, wood is softer before it dries.

    My suggestion would be to buy a file or two and touch up your chains frequently. They way they stay shaper and cut faster.

    Ken
  5. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Youi know what also helps it dry? Cutting it up and splitting it. LOL

    I killed some trees and left them standing dead for a year- they started to dry pretty well, but were a PITA to cut and really hard on the chain. Also- the bark was separating in places and there were more insect issues.
  6. bartlett920

    bartlett920 New Member

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    On hedge trees (Osage Orange Trees) there is a ton of sap and it seems like it gums up the chains I also looked at those benchtop grinders at Northern Tool one of them is pretty reasonably priced.
  7. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I use a dremel tool with the chain sharpener attachment (like $10). Works great.

    By the way- I have a little stash of osage, but it's all for bow making. I've made several bows from it and have even planted a few osage trees. I have 2 on my current property, growing very slowly. They need more sun and water than they get where they are planted.
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Hedgeburner, I also like to hunt deer but still much prefer cutting wood during the winter months. We always start cutting right after deer season.

    Believe it or not, poison ivy can still get you in the winter! Don't believe me? Just cut through some ivy vines and have that sap and sawdust on you then rub your hands on it. You will become a believer in not time at all. However, the good part is you usually have gloves on in the winter months.

    Now for cutting wood and leaving them a week (or better two or three weeks). There is just a little bit of truth to this...but not much. It will take some of the sap from the tree okay, but it certainly will not season that wood. Actually, it makes very little difference whether you cut the wood right away or wait the 2 or 3 weeks from our experience. Cut the tree in the fall or winter and you have a much better situation altogether as there is much less sap then.

    Now for the dulling of chains. It is not sappy wood that dulls chains! Dry wood will dull a chain much, much faster than sappy wood.

    Now at $6.00 for sharpening a chain, you can save yourself many, many dollars very quickly. As one stated, a dremel tool works great if you don't want to file. I bought one at the local Stihl dealer for $25 and it sharpens the chain fast and saves my hands. Northern Tool also sells a sharpener that is basically the same thing. The larger units for a workbench work just as good but no better and cost a lot more.

    If you are worried about not knowing how to sharpen the chain, the tool has a gauge on it to show you the proper angle. A couple seconds on each tooth is all it takes and you will learn fast while saving a lot of dollars. They you won't even have the expense of taking the chain to the shop to have it sharpened.

    In short, cut your wood, split it, stack it and let it season. Do not depend on a few leaves to remove the sap. Better to let nature do it and cut the trees in the winter months. Besides, it is much more comfortable doing that hard work when the weather is cool rather than sweating all summer cutting wood. Excellent exercise during the winter months also.
  9. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    Leave it standing until the bark falls off ;-) No bugs under the bark then.

    Seriously, I think that works better with some species than others. Red oak seems to do well that way.

    Ken
  10. bartlett920

    bartlett920 New Member

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    I just orderd a bench chain sharpener from harbor freight for $39 seems like it will pay for itself quickly even if it only lasts 1 or 2 seasons as I and a buddy have about 10 chains a piece.
  11. n6crv

    n6crv Feeling the Heat

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    Hello Hedgeburner, I use a bench chain sharpener from harbor freight and it works fine except. It will not work worth a darn on .325 chain the kind Stihl uses on the 250. The links will hit the screw where you clamp the chain in. I also found that I'm getting older and can't lift like I used to. So I rip alot of the rounds so I can lift them. If you sharpen a couple chains to 12deg they last a long time ripping. For the price it is not a bad grinder.
    Don
  12. Backroads

    Backroads Feeling the Heat

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    There's NO way I'm going to let cutting firewood interfere with hunting...EVER! I've been busy the last 4 days, picked up another 1 1/2 cords and split/stacked 1/2 of that already. I plan to have all mine split and stacked before Sept. 1.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Sounds like a good plan!
  14. Tfin

    Tfin New Member

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    I'll be bucking the last bid of dead red oak tonight and will be splitting it all tomorrow evening Sat morning.

    Then get it stacked and bring on winter....I'm ready!
  15. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    hedgeburner, you may as well C&S;all the wood now as your running out of seasoning time...plus all the other things said above.
  16. bartlett920

    bartlett920 New Member

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    I am few seasons ahead on my wood cutting so I have seasoned wood! Also thanks N6CRV for the info I mainly use 3/8 chain so hopefully I'll be alright. I just like to be ahead on my wood cutting so I cut a seasons worth every year atleast. I am an oppurtunist though and will not pass up free wood.
  17. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Well hedgeburner if you're a season ahead it would appear you have you're operation locked down tight...just keep doing what you're doing if it's working. Just bear in mind green wood is a lot easier to cut.

    btw after the leaves fall is when I'll cut the trees and stage up logs for next years wood...it's not uncommon to stop, take a break and see deer watching you...lots of farmers around here keep shotguns in their tractors and harvest deer as their working. It would seem by experience that deer are curious when it come to machinery in operation. For the last month I've been brush whacking and have seen lots of deer...no bucks though.

    ...good luck avoiding nails and whatnot on those boundary trees.
  18. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    In some places the deer will come to the sound of chainsaws because they associate them with finding tender young treetop leaves left by cutters.

    A new sort of deer call to be sure.
  19. Backroads

    Backroads Feeling the Heat

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    You are absolutely right, I can't remember how many times I looked up to find that I'm being watched.
  20. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

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    Just so ya know Lee, I am still buying for bargain prices. and saving my own wood for more dire straight days to come.
  21. backpack09

    backpack09 Minister of Fire

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    I hate dealing with wood in the summer. Its 85* damn near 100% humidity... I have sweat dripping off my brow sitting at my desk right now... No way in hell can I safely see what I am cutting or splitting this time of year. I leave my wood processing to the shoulder seasons. I have a couple of nice white maples I dropped in may before the summer set in. I will hunt them down in september.
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