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Summit insert took off!!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by James02, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    I run pure locust in very cold weather. It brings the stove top up to the 650-700F range. When it's below 20F outside that's just about right.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    Time to tone it down a bit. What I said in that post does not apply to the newer EBT system. It's an entirely different design that doesn't boost primary air at all. I like what they have done. Also note that the changes I made were for my stove and flue. One needs to make a judgement call here. There are lots of systems that work just fine without any modification. I have also found now that I have run the stove for several seasons that the way I load a stove has much more to do with burn temps than the EBT ever did. One of the mistakes folks make with these big fireboxes is aiming for a big, secondary light show. I now shoot for a good long steady burn, often loading E/W and throttling back the air much sooner.
  3. graycatman

    graycatman Member

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    Mar 7, 2010
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    Loc:
    Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    BG, I have been considering trying E/W in my Summit to lengthen burn times too. When you do this, do you still rake the coals forward? Assuming you do, do you shut down the air to its final setting before all the wood has charred (I assume the back pieces don't catch until the last part of the burn?) Also, do you pack it full E/W? Thanks for sharing your experience.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    46,014
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The answer to most of these questions is a qualified yes. It depends a lot on the wood being burned and stove draft. Out here we burn a lot of softwood too which tends to ignite easily as long as it is nice and dry. I do rake most of the coals forward if I am burning fir. But if it is a good hardwood like locust, then I tend to spread them out with a bias toward the front of the stove. I shut the air down in increments, watching the fire. 50% closed once the wood has started charring and there is a vigorous flame, 75% closed (or what ever it takes to make the flames lazy) about 5-10 minutes later. At this point there may only be some side flames licking out and modest secondary combustion in the top center of the stove. Let the fire intensity rise again for 5-10 minutes. Then close it as far as you can while still maintaining a very lazy flame. I can't say whether the back logs are fully charred at this point. Can't see them! But the front logs have blacked at this stage.
  5. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,680
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    You have been given some good advice here. If you choose to ignore it and burn the way "you" decide is right, then have at it, and keep whining about your problem.
    How long have you been burning the stove again? Maybe learn the stove, in your system, which I think anyone will agree, you will not learn to do in 1 burning season.
    ANY stove or insert is going to take off if you load it up on an already hot fire or coals, with good dry wood.

    A manual is a general information avenue. No set rules or instructions could possibly apply to each and every system and how it is set up and used.
    Your statement "Many new owners, including James02 and self, got an unpleasant surpise after stoking fully then finding that the fire was burnng much hotter and faster than desired". simply indicates you have not become accustomed to how your setup burns and how what temps to load, cut air back, how far back etc. I don't know many burners of any stove that have been burning for several seasons stating they cannot control their stove.

    You simply need to put the time, learning and patience in to finding what is best for your set up.
    I heat 2600sf with 2 loads a day, every 12 hours(Primary heat source). If you expect to heat with wood, you will need to learn patience, and be able to accept the fact that there will be a temp swing in the home of anywhere from 3 to 5 degrees +/- from time the stove is flaming, until time the level the coals and reload. You will do this with ANY stove, not specific to PE. The exception may be a cat stove, I don't have one so can't speak for them.
    Again, no literature on a manufacturers site is spot on. It is impossible to say your house, my house and Joe Shmoe's house will all heat the same way, for the same time periods, with the same load of fuel.

    I used to be like you, watching the inside house temp drop a few degrees, throwing more wood on an already hot load, and wondering why it was flaming away, burning more wood and not getting up to 80 degrees in here. I used to load every 8 hours, 3x a day. And at times with less than desirable wood, scooping coals out so I could make room to load her up yet again.
    We all live on a schedule, you will need to learn your stoves capabilities,and learn when to load and know how long it will be until relaoad. Most of us all do this.

    You will need to learn to adjust your burning habits and loading time to fit your schedule. Not just throw more splits in the firebox and expect it to act like a furnace set on a thermostat.
    If you want a steady temp that you can dial in whatever you want, then sell the stove and buy a gas or oil furnace and be done with it. You are not going to get that from a wood burning stove or insert. And for the record, a fireplace insert is just that, an insert, not a fireplace. One makes heat, the other wastes it.
  6. ailanthus

    ailanthus Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2012
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    327
    Loc:
    Shen Valley, VA
    Love that stonework, loon!!
    loon likes this.
  7. loon

    loon Minister of Fire

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    Apr 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,763
    Loc:
    ont canada

    Mixed with Maple and Elm as i dont have alot of Locust this year, but next year there should be a good whack of it in the carport lopiliberty ;)

    loon
  8. James02

    James02 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    345
    Loc:
    L-Town...N.Y.
    I'm loving that locust though....Seems as if it lasts forever...

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