Tandem Trailer Load of Split Wood, how to confirm cord count before delivery?

Xanabri Posted By Xanabri, Mar 9, 2010 at 12:08 PM

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  1. Xanabri

    Xanabri
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    Jan 18, 2010
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    Iowa, USA
    Here's the dilemma. We're starting to buy cord wood for the 2012/2013 heating season. We've purchased split wood from a variety of sources over the last few years (most were one shot guys picking up a few extra dollars) with prices as low as $150/ cord delivered and stacked (really closer to 3/4 cord) to as high as $205/ cord delivered and stacked. Last year we found some great red oak for $150/ cord dumped, which is now in storage. Yesterday, I read an advert on Craigslist for one tandem trailer load $600 cash delivered and dumped. The advert claims "about 4 cords of split oak and mixed hardwoods". I'm not sure how to pre-qualify the wood volume or quality before delivery and I’m not sure waiting for pure oak isn't a better option. We live on a small farm so we have almost unlimited storage space, but our budget is always a consideration. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
     
  2. peterc38

    peterc38
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    Sep 10, 2009
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    Loc:
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    Find out the volume of the trailer in cubic feet.

    L x W x D = Cubic feet

    180 cubic feet loose thrown = 1 cord (128 cubic feet stacked)
     
  3. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    Nov 9, 2008
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    Somewhere between 180 and 200 cu ft for a bulk loaded cord is the generally accepted number.

    The mix of species could be a bigger factor in total BTU.
     
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Feb 14, 2007
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    Tandem trailers come in many sizes. Hardwood comes in many species. Wood can be just thrown into a trailer or stacked. Which is this? So the only thing you really have to go on is what the guy is telling you. I would probably tend to think his "about 4 cords" is a bit off. Definitely I'd ask more questions and even if possible pay him a visit. You might even ask for references.
     
  5. xrayman

    xrayman
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    Jul 11, 2008
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  6. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford
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    Mar 17, 2009
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    Just remember that "about 4 cords of split oak and mixed hardwoods” will weigh at least 10,000 lbs. That must be one pretty butch trailer he's got there. Four cords stacked would be 16 feet long, 8 feet wide, and stacked 4 feet high. Thrown would be MUCH bigger. I'd ask to at least see the trailer. I bet it is closer to 2 cords.
     
  7. Tony H

    Tony H
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    Oct 24, 2007
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    +1

    I have a 15'x5'x2' tandem trailer and no way could I get 4 cords on it I can get two if stacked 3.5 high.
    A common landscape trailer size is 16x6xX sides (7000lb)so if it was Stacked tight 4' high it could hold 3 cord max. but it would be real close to max weight . The same size in a heavy equipment type trailer might be 10,000 or 14,000 lbs
    Maybe he has one of those 16 x6 x6 dump trailers that would hold a bit over 4 stacked (thrown in about 3.2)
    .
     
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