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The H-Frame Sawbuck - Cutting poles

Post in 'The Gear' started by MasterMech, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I hate cutting small poles into individual rounds on the ground. So when I decided to build a sawbuck for trimming splits, I made it so I could buck up poles in it as well. 4-6 cuts sounds a lot better than hundreds!

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 15, 2013
    WellSeasoned likes this.

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  2. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Try loading that one again. Youtube still says it is processing.
  3. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    It's still uploading Dennis. At the rate things are moving, it should finish between 10:15-10:30pm.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Okay. Good night!
  5. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Cool , It's workin now ,whats better than pictures ? Videos :)
    My pole cutting rig works great , but now I going to have to mod it for re cutting splits , as I have some long ones in the stacks (most are 17" though) , old stove would take 28", new stove takes 18"
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2013
  6. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl Minister of Fire

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    Vid looks great. Big time saver. Which model Stihl were you using? Fast cutter.
  7. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    MS460 Magnum
    20" ES bar with 8 pin rim sprocket
    33RS-72 chain

    It saves even more time not filing or grinding chain since it keeps you from accidentally grounding the chain. If was lighter or easier to move I would consider taking it to where I usually cut.
    clemsonfor and NortheastAl like this.
  8. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl Minister of Fire

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    You're right about saving the chain. Plus, your back has to appreciate not having to cut on the ground.
  9. BucksCounty

    BucksCounty Feeling the Heat

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    Very cool. I have something similar but about 1/10 the size. I think I might be making something similar. Thanks for the vid. Nice saw.
    MasterMech likes this.
  10. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    This is one reason I want a 24 or say 28" bar, so I don't have to bend over as much. Not that I cut much over 20"s. But when I cut stuff that small I will cut it and throw in the trailer or truck in like 6 or 8 ft lengths. When I get home I take the larger ones which usually work out to about 6" diameter and lay 3 or 4 parallel on the ground at about the spacing I want the rounds cut to. Then lay wood on top of them parallel. I then cut each cut, across the length of them at each round length and then cut each cut. Usually easily and not binding and keeps the chain out of the dirt.
  11. NW Walker

    NW Walker Member

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    That's nice MM, thanks for posting. I've got a flimsy H-frame I use the same way, but you've given me a few ideas on what to do better.
    MasterMech likes this.
  12. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I'm 30 years old. My back gets no respect. ;lol
  13. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    There are things a out this one I would consider improving. Mainly adding clearance between the bottom of the stack and the lower frame rails. I have also considered removing the center sections of top frame rail but since kickback is a definite possibility with this thing, I kinda like them there. Also thinking of metal brackets to stiffen it up a bit as there is a bit of flex in it. I would definitely do that if I was going to truck it around more.
  14. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    H-frames work real good for trimming splits too.

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/trimming-long-splits-sawbuck-and-the-034.106578/
  15. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    I have discovered that if you put a rig something like that right on your trailer or truck bed, you can save even more time.

    I scrounge from the back yard, so I ATV a trailer right to the trees. Cut the trees to 8' or so, toss them onto the trailer, ATV the trailer back to my splitting/piling area, then cut to length right on the trailer - it's at just the right height to cut at, and the wood all lands right where the next step in the process will be.

    Anything that is too big for me to put on the trailer in long lengths I buck where it falls and ATV the splitter right to them. Then I pile right onto a pallet on the trailer, and unload that with a FEL when I get it back to where it's going to season at, which is the same place I do all my other bucking-on-trailer. I top the pallets up with the trailer bucked stuff.

    Sawbucks are pretty under rated - they were off my radar not that long ago.
  16. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    At 31 I hear you on the back thing. But I have hurt mine. And since I'm not as physical as I was 10 yrs ago I feel it latter after lifting huge stuff.

    I worked at pep boys when in college. We stocked the tires in evening and Saturdays mostly. I think I was prolly 19 at the time? So even younger. For some reason the truck tires were on the top rack, like 9 ft up in air. These were full size stock tires so back then were talking 245/265 70 16 just to give an idea. I don't remember the exact tire it was but we threw them up top then climbed the ladder and stacked them neat. This was not the correct way, spose to climb one at a time or hand off. Anyway I threw one and wrenched my back awfully. Felt like a rib broke. Shooting pain, hurt that night to breath and just lay down. It was bad for like 24 hours but tender for a week or more if I were 40 or older it would of been bad I know. As far as I can tell no problems with it since, luckily. But I do take that stuff more serious!
  17. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Everybody's situation is different. What works for me may be a waste of time for the next guy. Since I source 99.9% of my wood off-site, I'm always looking to get home faster. If I had my own wood lot or was lucky enough to scrounge in the back 40, then I would certainly do things differently to minimize my overall processing time.
    clemsonfor likes this.
  18. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    You cut those in 3.5 min, normally on the ground, probably 15 min. Nice time and back saver!
    TreePointer likes this.

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