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Things you have learned...

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by CowboyAndy, Oct 23, 2008.

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  1. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    There is a thread in the hearth room about things learned in the first year burning, and I thought it would be a good idea for us to share the nuggets of wisdom learned while harvesting.

    THINGS I HAVE LEARNED WHILE FELLING/BUCKING/SPLITTING/STACKING:

    No matter how you say it, or how many times you say it, kids will NOT stack wood as neat as you.

    A QUALITY chainsaw and sharp chain is worth its weight in gold.

    So isn’t a properly maintained hydrolic splitter.

    RESPECT for the chainsaw and a falling tree is more important than your “macho” image.

    Chaps, helmet and safety glasses look better and are more comfortable than a wheelchair or casket.

    The following have no place in the woods while felling trees: Kids, booze, sandals, shorts, loud music and people who don’t respect mother nature.

    No, you can’t get one more tree out of that dull chain.

    Yes, you do need BAR AND CHAIN OIL, not motor oil/transmission fluid/brake fluid or whatever else you have hanging around.

    No, you may not borrow my chainsaw/splitter/trailer/truck, but I would be happy to come help you so long as you help me when I need it.

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  2. caber

    caber New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2008
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    291
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    Always clear the area in which you are bucking or felling and keep it that way while you are working. No one wants to step back quickly and trip with a running chainsaw.

    Splitting with a maul can make chips fly into your face. Wear eye protection.

    Plan and clear your escape path.

    Look up and see what's there.


    #1 - Learn what you are doing. I see too many people cut little notches that go 3 inches into a 24 inch diameter tree and then wonder why it doesn't fall correctly. Or they have no idea how to determine which way the tree wants to fall and how to plan for or change it's direction. Just a dangerous - what a tree on the ground is going to do when you cut into it. There are books, there are videos, there are resources available. Find them, study them, know them. Too many people have just enough knowledge to give themselves false confidence and make them even more a danger. YouTube has some great videos of what happens when you try cutting down a tree w/o knowing what you are doing.

    #2 - Personal protection gear. Way to many people either don't use it or don't bother having any. I don't run a saw without boots, chaps, gloves and a face shield. I walked onto a property where three other people were cutting up downed trees. I was in full gear and they looked at me like I was crazy (including the property owner). No one else had chaps or face protection. Two were wearing sneakers, one had flip-flops, all were in shorts. That was a lot of bramble to be climbing thru carrying running saws wearing flip-flops. None of them had a clue about how to work safely. Just a matter of time before serious injury.
  3. bdog

    bdog New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    48
    Loc:
    Western NY
    Good topic...

    1) Good saw - well maintained is a must, easier and safer

    2) Saftey gear - a must, helmet, chaps, face screen, earmuffs, gloves and steel toe boots

    3) Saftey first - no booze, pay attention, know where everyone else is, especially when dropping a tree, careful of your back when lifting, clear your work area, tripping with a saw is not a good thing, have an escape route

    4) If the tree looks too big, or it might be tricky bringing it down, don't do it

    5) stacked logs and timber are dangerous, same for trees leaning on other trees - a lot of tension builds up on logs that are bent or twisted - nothing like watching a 20" diameter ash snap straight like the string on a bow

    6) respect the woods - be selective as to the harvest, think 20 years ahead

    7) when nature calls, dig a small pit, don't leave it where someone else is gonna step in it

    8) take breaks as you go, most accidents happen when your getting tired

    9) if you don't cut/split/process wood regularly muscles you didn't know you had are gonna hurt the next day, and even worse the day after

    10) look up into the tree first before felling it, see what's there - dead limbs, leaning trees

    11) Green wood can be heavy - watch the springs on your truck, just cause it can fit on the truck doesn't mean your truck can carry it

    I started cutting wood with my grandfather, who was a carpenter, farmer, and used to supply ash logs to a local mill for Louisville Slugger baseball bats, and maple and cherry to a mill for Kittinger furniture. I learned the first points from him. The last I had to learn the hard way.
  4. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    1,847
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    I have learned that if you try to split kindling at 4:00am in the morning, during an ice storm, with a mag light in your mouth so you can see, cause the power went out and you are trying to keep your family warm, you may just cut the tip of your finger off when using a splitting maul....ouch.

    Also, wife was not thrilled about looking for the cut off piece while I am at the ER.

    Lesson learned...preperation is the key....always have your wood/kindling handy and ready to go.
  5. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    604
    Loc:
    Indiana
    The first thing that comes to my mind is don't always go with what the fireplace store tells you.
    If they say the size stove or insert will heat your house don't be afraid to go up the next size,
    as it has cost me $1000's to learn this tip.

    Shipper
  6. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    6,419
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    never sit on a cactus.
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    cut your wood in the spring less people looking for it then,and time to season it as well.
  8. FireWalker

    FireWalker New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
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    Loc:
    Lake George
    Put the seat up, pee, then put it back down.
  9. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
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    744
    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    you bring a toilet out to cut wood???
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