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This year's cutting

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Backwoods Savage, Jan 6, 2009.

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  1. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Savageactor, why don't you use that front end loader to get that other tree down? Or simply chain the tree and pull it down with the tractor.

    Actually, those aren't that dangerous and very easy to take down with the chain saw. If it were a big tree, then for sure I'd hesitate, but that little thing would be a piece of cake. What I do is cut on top, but you have to be very careful to not let the saw pinch. Watch the crack and as it shows the least sign of coming together, get that saw out fast. Then simply undercut and it will fall. As to where to make the cut, I usually cut at about waist height but like to cut 4 feet lengths, which gives 3 firewood logs when finished.

    The only caution to make is to watch the rest of the tree. You should be able to tell what it will do just by studying how the tree is held at the top. Also, is the butt end jammed into the ground? If so, that means there is hard pressure against the butt and when you make that final cut, the rest of the tree is going to want to come down too and will do so fast. That is why I caution about doing this on larger trees unless you've had some experience. As a one-time logger I used to do this sort of thing daily on big stuff and have never came close to an accident. However, I have heard of some, so be careful. And if you are not comfortable doing it, then simply leaving it is still best.

    Hope that made sense.

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I'm green with envy of you guys with FELs. If I had one I'd be out back getting free firewood off my land rather than buying it by the truckload. If only I could get the CFO to approve the acquisition.

    As for taking down leaners, I did a lot of that on pipeline construction cleanup jobs. That one in the pic looks to be broken half way up and leaning downward.
  3. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Hi guys that pic is was taken on top of a spur looking down into a hollow so it makes that Hurricane Ike tree look small. It's broken at about 35+ feet above ground and there are other issues too. It's really a big tree. It's only 2 out of about 20 tops from Ike that that I passed on...when I get all caught up then I go back and have a look see. Hopefully by then the guy that put it there will have brought it down ha ha.

    Another reason is where they're at in the woods is no threat, I have in the past taken worse hangers than that but they were over trails or mowed areas that could jeopardize safe traffic. With me more often it takes longer to think up a good plan than executing.

    Yeah having a FEL is a great labor saver and it'll get you unstuck. I was looking forward to grabbing another bucket full today but when I took the dogs out this morning I found we got 8" of new snow. So now I have to wait for it to compact some cause even though you have 4 wheel drive and chains you can still get stuck real easy.

    [​IMG]

    This easy on/off tool carrier lets me use the bucket for self recovery. In mud or snow your gambling when you carry stuff in the bucket. Even if you remember to unload it all things can disappear pretty quick.

    ...just say'en it took me longer to stain that 3PH wood carrier than to cobble it together but it has proven itself to be an indispensable aid to efficient production.
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    You should use a weight box in conjunction with the FEL. I see a lot of guys stick PVC tubes into the concrete they pour in the wieght box to hold tools. I'd include one of those plastic bar gaurds too.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Or cut off an old rubber hose and slit it. Then put it over the chain. But even if the saw hits the side of his tool carrier it won't hurt as it is all wood. But then there is that ugly thing he has on the side. I had to study that for a long time to figure out what it was. It's been so long since I've used one. lol Savage, your next tool needs to be a good splitter.
  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    For winter cutting I'm a minimalist and took the bar guard off. When I first started doing that years ago I had a good reason based on a prior bad experience ...it escapes me now. In the summer it's on all the time...only other tool in there is the scrench.
  7. deadon

    deadon New Member

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    [quote author="Backwoods Savage" date="1231282911"]Cowboy Andy: Don't be such a pansy! lol I'll bet you don't even like to shovel off the sidewalk either! lol

    Cutting wood during the winter months has many advantages:

    1. Most of the sap is not in the trees then so the wood seasons faster.
    2. Felling a tree in winter, you do not have to worry about disturbing the new bird families.
    3. The ground is frozen (hopefully) so you don't have to worry about hauling that weight out and getting stuck in the mud.
    4. Naturally getting stuck in the snow could be a concern, but not when you have a 6-7 year supply already on hand. But with that much on hand, if the snow gets too deep, we simply stop cutting.
    5. I have yet to swat a mosquito while cutting wood in the winter.
    6. You don't have to worry so much about poison ivy.
    7. Most people could stand the extra exercise during the winter...and this way you have no gym fees to pay.
    8. If you get too warm while cutting wood, you can remove some clothing. During the warmer weather there is only so much you can remove and then you just expose more for the insects to get at.
    9. If you get cold while cutting during the winter, you can easily start a fire using some of that brush you just piled up. Heck, you can even take along a lunch and use that fire for warming a sandwich or roasting a hot dog, etc.
    10. With more clothing and heavier boots and such, you have a little bit of safety protection.
    11. During the warmer weather there are so many other activities to be involved in that there is not much time for cutting wood compared with winter months.

    Savage, I totaly agree. I love to cut during the winter months. Last weekend I cut 7 full size pickup loads of oak and ash. I cut my wood at 4 foot to 6 foot lengths then in the spring and summer I work at cutting to size and spltting at my leasure. I cut on a friends farm and during the off season with no crops in the fields he allows me to drive in the field and cut along the edge. This helps him with keeping the fields clear and I drive right up to the tree and get free wood easy. I often build a fire outside at my cabin since I cut around there and store my wood there. Sweet Itailian venison sasauge over the fire when it is 0 out is the life.. No better time than the winter. Hey Cowboy give it a try and you too will be hooked.
  8. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    You summer time cutters should give Backwoods Savage's advice some second thought. Winter cutting has a certain appeal to it that I know if you gave it a try most would really like it.
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