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  1. Megaputz

    Megaputz New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I have only been burning for a month now. Before that I have little experience other than my grams oil/wood furnace and cousins fire place. Don't think you can count open pit burning...

    I bought a US Stove 1,100 to heat my 600 square foot home as a way to subsidize the electric baseboard heat. http://www.lowes.com/pd_154309-850-APS1100B_0__?productId=3271167&cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-HeatingCooling-_-WoodFireplacesStoves-_-3271167&CAWELAID=1072248704&kpid=3271167&"cagpspn=pla"
    It was the smallest stove I could find but it seems to be way more than enough. On average like a weekend I'm using 6-8 splts a day to heat the house.

    From what I have been reading I'm doing everything wrong but if I burn hot and get the magnetic thermostat to the 'burn zone' I have to open the windows. That seems like such a terrible waste of fuel. I'm burning silver maple I cut down and split in the summer of 2011. It was for my brother but he hurt his back and did not feel up to lugging wood.

    The stove is tiny. I can fit 2 splits in the box, no more unless they are small splits. The draft is excellent. I can open the door at any time and there is not smoke or back draft... I actually have to let some of the embers fall out and sit on the shelf to get that woodsy fireplace smell. Smoke detector in kitchen is 6' away and it doesn't go off. When it has it is because the split was 1" or so too long. Brother uses 18" and the max I can fit in there is ~16"... so some of the splits I cut in half to ~8" or so chunks for north/south loading.

    On cold starts it lights right up, a couple of crumpled 8"x11" pieces of paper and a couple smaller/thinner maple splits. When it's going strong I'll add a split or two.
    Those two splits will burn for ~2 hours and the embers another 2-3 hours keeping the stove top at 400*. The embers will sustain about 300* for another 2 hours. Make the tunnel of love with the ashes and put another split in there and so on. No real room for a rack so the ashes are the rack so air gets under the splits.

    So about the only time I have been getting the black iron pipe 2' above the stove in the 'burn zone' is the mornings when the house is ~60*. After that is is just unbearable to be in the house if I try to sustain the burn zone. So 90% of the time the thermostat reads 200* 2' on the stove pipe. That is aside from the 30 minutes during a hot/cold start when the house is at it's coldest

    If the stove top temp is higher than 450* it's just too hot. Above that stove top temperature range it doesn't even feel safe. It seems WAY hotter than when you open an oven when it's at 450* but the difference is the heat radiates from every surface of the stove including the stove pipe.

    Single wall black stove pipe goes up 35" into a 90* and 56" to the chimney which is concrete block with a 6"x6" tile liner. From the point the stove pipe enters it's ~13' to the top of the chimney

    Does anyone else have a small stove like this and how do you best utilize it? I have spent the last couple of weeks reading your forum and and web trying to research but there is very little info on such a small stove. The manual that came with the stove was basically install directions. Should I bother to aim for the flu temps or just worry about smoke coming out of the chimney? My real concern is creosote. When I looked at the top of the chimney there was a substance similar to amber on the cap and some was oozing into the stack. The rest of the flu was relitivly clean with the exception of where the stove pipe is. In that location and 2' up there was thin, black, flaky stuff on the side of tile. Inside the black stove pipe it was some gray fluffy stuff along with some more black, flaky stuff under. The elbow above the stove had the most buildup.

    I'm really worried about not burning hot enough but I don't want to burn too hot. The first time I got the thermostat I tried to get the pipe to temp and in order to get it to 450* I let it get hot and ignored the stove top temps and tried to just get the pipe to a "safe" temperature. After it cooled down and I inspected/cleaned the stove I noticed one of the ceramic bricks by the flu collar was not sitting right. The angle iron on the left side of the stove has warped.

    With the smaller stove and less capacity should I just concentrate on the smoke coming out of the chimney or do flu temps matter? Just burn it as clean as possible and forget about getting to the temps required for a stove that can hold far more fuel?

    Would really appreciate some tips from others who have a similar stove. 6-8 splits a day including the 2 for an all night burn is awesome. It just feels like I'm pushing this little stove way harder than I should have to to keep the chimney clean. I would rather just clean the chimney manually once a month.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,657
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome. Heating a small space with a woodstove is not easy. It sounds like you are doing ok. Why you are using wood? Is there no power, gas or propane available?
  3. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,071
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    If you can burn that stove at 400 - 450 stove top and no smoke is coming out of that chimney then forget about that stack thermometer. Small firebox stoves are a different breed. Internal firebox temps come up fast. Keep just enough flame going to not have smoke coming out of that chimney and you will be fine. Only burn it hot on cold starts when the chimney is cold to warm it up as soon as you can.
  4. lopiliberty

    lopiliberty Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    Messages:
    844
    Loc:
    Mineral County, WV
    My dad has the same stove and is heating just about the same sqft. It does ok but when we had the cold snap he could only get the house to 60 degrees. It has the smallest firebox I have ever seen. Just about wore us out cutting and splitting wood that small. He has a thermometer on the pipe and it has never gotten above 200 degrees even when the stove is cranking and even when its cranking its not really putting out that much heat. Because of the small firebox, sometimes the fire smolders to get a long burn so he has to clean the flue every week or so which is not a big deal just pop out the two top firebrick and sweep. Don't get me wrong its a good little stove, but just doesn't hold enough wood for a long burn. He will probably be looking for a bigger stove for next year
  5. Megaputz

    Megaputz New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I'm using wood because... I have lots of wood. Always get asked to cut down trees for people. Have an acre of land with plenty of wood too. Sandy knocked over allot of trees that were cleared up and thought I would heat the house instead of giving it away. Normally give it to brother and gram and cousin. Brother doesn't want to bother this year, gram passed away last week. Waste not want not ya know. Always end up burning it in bon fires or giving it away. If I can heat the house or supplement with it than the $300 I spent on the stove will pay for itself.

    More than that though... I like the warmth. It puts out heat amazingly well. I was able to keep the house a comfortable 75-80* when it was -10* and wake up to a moderate 60. The electric alone... I was lucky to hold 65 with it -10*

    Also have one of those ventless natural gas heaters. That is what I would kick on when the electric wouldn't cut it. The air in the house would get stale. The wood stove on the other hand uses the poor house insulation to it's advantage... sucking in fresh air. After the first burn it was like night and day. The air quality in the house and the feel of real heat. I can sleep in the nude again!

    The biggest disappointment is the lack of the wood burning smell I expected.

    I "loaded it at 6pm today and it's 11pm and I'm about to go to bed. Stove it still putting out enough heat to keep it 80* in here 20* outside. I'm more than happy with the stove. I'm just wondering how others run a small stove like it. Most of you guys run much bigger.

    The splits I use are normal size, I guess. About 5"x16" I'm not cutting kindling. A little paper and 1 (smaller) split in there and it normally fires up.

    Thanks for the help and sweet dreams
  6. tigeroak

    tigeroak Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2012
    Messages:
    198
    Loc:
    kansas illinois
    Mega
    I have the next size up in that stove and you can not run the stove in the safe zone on the pipe temps as it will heat the house to hot plus the stove to hot. What we do with ours is get a rolling flame [ about 300 on stove pipeor close to that-- yours maybe less]and start to choke the air about half way they again until you get lazy flames and leave it alone. Then when you have coals rake to the front and pull air wide open and let her burn coals, then load when you have enough to go again. Love to watch it burn the gases off ,pertty blue flames. We are burning mostly walnut and soft maple and it keeps our house about 74-78 at all times. I cleaned my pipes here the other day for the first time this burning season and got less than 1 cup of what I would call a black sandy type soot. Dry wood you will be fine with these stoves.
  7. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,569
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Just watch your chimney if you're not running the stove at proper temperatures. Creosote could creep up on you....

    Andrew
  8. MaintenanceMan

    MaintenanceMan Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2010
    Messages:
    146
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    I also burn a small stove. A couple of thoughts. As far as worrying about the chimney, the number one thing you can do is insure you are burning dry wood. That right there should alleviate most of your concerns as far as creosote. Also I would not be too trusting of the magnetic thermometers personally. I purchased several of them and they were all off tremendously. All low by far. I think one was about 120 degrees off. You might be pushing your stove harder than you think. I would purchase an infrared thermometer. They are pretty cheap anymore. For stack temps you would be better off with a probe thermometer too. I just really don't trust the magnetic ones after my experiences with them this season.
  9. tomc585

    tomc585 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    57
    Loc:
    Long Island, New York
    I agree, those magnetic thermos are for reference only. I compare mine with an inferred every once and a while just to see whats going on. I find that (and being a seasoned burner) if my glass door stays clean I'm doing something right. Every stove burns different and wood types (and conditions) burn different as well. Its all a learning game.

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