1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Took more pics of my mystery wood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by fabsroman, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,120
    Loc:
    Northern Kentucky along the Ohio River
    It is black locust. the same type of tree will look different based on many different factors including, but not limited to: geographic growing region, area the tree was growing within the geogrphic region, soil condition, rain fall age of the tree and so on.
    mizzou and ScotO like this.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4,028
    Loc:
    NNJ
    Except thats like having fresh split oak dry after 8 mos, it doesn't happen.
  3. StihlHead

    StihlHead Guest

    I do not know why you persist with this line of argument, but I can attest that the photos posted by the OP look EXACTLY like the black locust that I have in my stacks, and I can assure you that I do not have Siberian Elm. My locust wood has growth rings that are fairly wide apart, and they appear the same as the OP.
  4. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,235
    Loc:
    Croton-on-Hudson, suburbs of NYC
    Black Locust for sure.
  5. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    731
    Loc:
    Maine
    Upon reviewing the pics, I don't think it's locust either.

    This is from a standing dead locust in a dying stand across the street from my house.
    The only thing I don't likeabout locust is those God-forsaken thorns..


    130213_0002.jpg 130213_0000.jpg 130213_0001.jpg
  6. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Yes, I have hoards of wood......mostly black and honey locust!!:p;)

    As for some people "having trouble burning it", you are exactly right. Most people expect to be able to chuck a heap of locust splits in the stove and for it to take off in a raging inferno. That is not the case. It starts out really slow for most people, but it gasifies for HOURS AND HOURS, and leaves a great coal bed. The key, IMHO, is to have that gasifying. You want that in a good woodstove, that's where the efficiency comes from. And even though the locust fire doesn't look as hot as say a pine fire does, it still puts out more heat over a LOT longer period of time.......I take all I can.

    so those of you east of the Mississippi.....send me your wretched locust. Those west of the river, send yours to Stihlhead. We'll get rid of it for ya!!::-)
    StihlHead likes this.
  7. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    5,793
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    No mystery there; Black Locust, 100%. If I cut some that's dead on the ground, it will be brown....but the MC will be <18%. Those splits have been cut a while, and they will turn brown then, too. OP's description of the stringy stuff under the bark is right on. Only thing he didn't mention was the stench when you pull the bark off, as Ralphie said. Classic BL..
    I've got quite a bit stacked in a double row last summer, split fairly big. Some were dead but others were somewhat fresh. Bark was loose on most of mine, and I pulled what I could. Maybe that'll help. From what you guys are saying though, I'll be letting it sit a couple more years. I'll just keep hammering on the Ash, Cherry and soft Maple. I do have about a cord of BL that has been stacked a year. Gotta be good next winter...gotta be! o_O
    I have a buttload of wood stacked, but can't burn any of it for years! !!!

    Did I mention that fab's wood is Black Locust? ;lol
    ScotO and StihlHead like this.
  8. IanDad

    IanDad Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    45
    Loc:
    Central PA
    Concur: Locust.

    It is indeed difficult to get rolling without a good bed of coals. Fantastic for overnight burns though with a strong bed of coals in the morning. Rinse. Lather. Repeat. 24x7.
  9. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,012
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    Not only does the stuff stink when you peel the bark off, but the smoke from it stinks pretty good too. I think it is the only one from the bunch that I cannot really stand. With the others, when I go up my stairs after feeding the furnace I get a sense of nostalgia of my parents old fireplace. When I have locust in the furnace, I just get sick when I go up the stairs.

    I think the real thing that will settle the debate on siberian elm versus locust is whether the bark falls off siberian elm in the same manner as locust (i.e., leaves strings behind and smells like crap). Seems like a lot of moisture gets caught between the bark and the sap wood until the bark is pulled off. Would also love to see a cross section of siberian elm. I know black locust grows aplenty around this area. Even had a client offer me 3 of them last summer, but never had the time to go get them. Have yet to run across siberian elm, unless this actually turns out to be siberian elm.
  10. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    5,793
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    I get my BL from a grove on the edge of a farm field, that also grows back into the woods a ways with other trees. Big growth rings as it competes with other trees (and other BL) for light.
    I try to get as much of the bark off as possible, and don't notice too much of an odor when burning bark-less BL. Maybe my nose is full of sawdust, though... ;lol
    Those last two end grain pics? Claaaasic BL. :cool:
  11. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
    I am going to take a different tact on this and suggest considering cottonwood. While the endgrain lookd pretty tight in the side-on views, the bark views looked a lot like this snap of I grabbed from google images (searched for "cottonwood bark")...just a thought.
  12. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
    So I grabbed a pict of black locast bark the same way above to compare/contrast. Boy from just lookin at these picts on the computer screen, it looks close?

    Attached Files:

  13. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
  14. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,012
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    Yeah, definitely not cottonwood. From what I have been reading on here, cottonwood is like poplar. I cut down a poplar a month after this "mystery wood" and the poplar is at 19% and light as can be. In fact, I brought a couple huge pieces into the house the other day, one in each hand, and my wife thought I was strong as can be until I told her they were really light. This "mystery wood" is pretty dense.
  15. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,451
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I was curious about this, did a bit more searching and it seems I was wrong. The idea that moisture content in live trees changes significantly over the year is apparently an old myth.

    Seasonal sap flow and moisture content in trees
    Redlegs likes this.
  16. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,169
    Loc:
    Central PA
    That still doesn't look like Black Locust to me. The growth rings are too wide and the color seems wrong. I don't know what it is.
  17. Stax

    Stax Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2010
    Messages:
    944
    Loc:
    Southeastern PA
    BL ALL DAY.

Share This Page