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Tree working tools?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jay H, Apr 8, 2007.

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  1. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Anybody know of a place in northern NJ that sells tree working tools, specifically I think it's called a Peavy but it's a long wooden pole with a spike at the end and a hook/pawl that allows one to roll long logs over by giving you leaverage on it. I have some really large trunks that I will have to buck up into rounds and I'll need to roll them for cutting. If there is place in NJ that is great, if there is a good online source, that is also good, but I prefer local.

    There is a Tractor Supply Company up by high point that I believe sells farm equipment, but is there anything else? Would a big box hardware store sell something like this?

    My first year of wood cutting!

    Jay

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  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    True Value sells them. At least the ones in the country do. I haven't seen them in the urban/suburnban ones, but I haven't really look

    There are lots of places on the net that sell them.

    Matt
  3. Charlie Z

    Charlie Z New Member

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    Sometimes, you just need to break 36 million eggs
    My local (NY) hardware store carries them for $9 more (less than shipping?) than the guy on ebay...
  4. computeruser

    computeruser Feeling the Heat

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    If you go the online route, the ones from Bailey's are good, both the LogRite and the wooden handle versions. I've used both brands in both cant hook and peavy formats and think that for most uses the cant hook is the better choice.
  5. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    Where would the spike on the end of the peavy make it better than the cant hook? What different jobs were they designed for?

    Matt
  6. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Aha, good I'm glad I got the name right... I bought my kevlar/polyester chaps from Labonville and noticed they sell some tools in there but I didn't have enough foresight to look at them, oh well. I have a few true values near me and can take a look there... I have enough wood to cut that is off the ground at this point to keep me busy for awhile.

    As the alternative to rolling over trunks on the ground so that I can cut them without touching the ground, do they make something like a extended wedge? something I can put into a log on the ground but not cut all the way so I can drive the round out without having to roll the trunk? Perhaps using my splitting maul and this tool as an alternative to rolling and cutting...

    Jay
  7. BigV

    BigV Member

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  8. Csmith

    Csmith New Member

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    I found a cant hook at Ace hardware in VA, so you may want to give them a try for the peavey
  9. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    I've got another problem... Most of these trunks are quite large, like some of them are easily 2-3'+ diameter logs, not exactly 8-10" as the northern tool peavey says it's made for. Perhaps I can't use it as a cantdog, but perhaps would I be able to get enough leaverage to roll a very large trunk?

    Jay
  10. Andre B.

    Andre B. New Member

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    A Cant is a log that has been squared up by removing the four slabs, at the saw mill. The Cant hook is used mainly just to roll the Cant over while it is on the saw.

    The Peavey is used more for moving logs around. You can jam the point into a log and use the hook to pull a second log into position when making a pile or loading a bobsled. Also useful for breaking up log jams, where the pointed end can be used to push logs around in the water.

    Peaveys have longer handles because they needed more leverage, at the mill the long handle can get in the way and there is always someone around to help with a large cant but in the woods you could be working by yourself and need everything you could get.
  11. BigV

    BigV Member

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    I think the Northern Tool device recommends nothing larger than 8 to 10” diameter for lifting off the ground. I have personally rolled logs a lot bigger with mine. Use another one with a buddy, and you can move huge logs.
  12. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Cool, I think the longest peavey I can find will suit me, There is no way I'm lifting these 10ft long trunks off the ground unless I have heavy machinery.

    I'm thinking 2 of these 5ft long metal peaveys would do wonders:

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200333233_200333233

    Has anybody successfully used 2 of these babys to rotate big 10ft sections of oak that is about 2-3' diameter trunks...

    Jay
  13. Andre B.

    Andre B. New Member

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    If by "rotate" you mean to just roll the log then yes.

    If you mean to rotate as in turn the log so that it will now roll in a new direction then that depends on how good your technique is. Roll the log until it is balanced on a high spot of ground or spit of wood and then with one person on each end you can rotate/turn the log even a really big one.
    Never had a Peavey but this works with cant hooks. Jam the hook part into the end of the log with the handle parallel to the log, you and you will have more leverage to rotate/turn the log.

    Attached Files:

  14. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Yup, thanks Andre, I just would need to move a log from a pile of logs so I can buck them into rounds. A local tree service guy gave me about 13 10' long trunks of various hardwoods stacked two high, so I'd need to move them into position for me to cut and then also rotate the logs to put the uncut part on the top...

    I'm going to buy 2 of those 5' long peavys and have at it with a friend of mine..

    Jay
  15. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Thanks all, I just bought 2 5' Peav(e)ys from NorthernTool and have put those log hooks on my birthday list... I've heard that they are fairly useful at chucking rounds around...

    Jay
  16. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I prefer a cant hook to a peavey for moving logs around on solid ground. The peavey was originally designed for river driving, where you don't have to contend with the spike digging into the ground and otherwise getting in the way. The spike on the peavey does come in handy when trying to pry frozen logs apart, however. If possible, it's always good to have one of each handy when attacking a pile of wood.

    You can also use a cant hook or a peavey for getting hung-up trees on the ground. Sometimes all you need to do is roll the tree until it clears the obstacles and falls. But neither tool is something you want to be dragging around with you in a woodlot.
  17. KarlP

    KarlP Feeling the Heat

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    For future reference, the people in this place is really friendly. Even to homeowners... http://www.northeasternarborist.com/
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