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Tri-Lake Mfg. Co. Hot Springs Ark???

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Durangoranch, Aug 16, 2006.

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  1. Durangoranch

    Durangoranch New Member

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    Hello I just purchased a large wood burner and was wondering if anyone knew anything about it.
    It's a large double door steel with step down. The doors have a log cabin and trees on them.
    It will handle about 20-24" pieces of wood. Exhausts out the back. I saw one online about a year ago and don't remember where.
    I got the stove, the pipe, an ash can, fireplace tools, wood holder and steel floor plate for $200.00 from someone at work.
    There is only one rust spot on the step where a humidifier may have boiled over.

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  2. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    any writing on it? without much information, I might think all nighter... usually has the name on the door though, and the models were Moe, mid-moe, etc. I don't remember if they ever had double doors, though.

    Opps.... update... sorry didn't see the name at the thread heading... so my guess is wrong
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Is that stove UL listed? If it is not you will be hard pressed min obtaining a building permit
    Current codes require all fireplaces to be labled and listed Many states require the stoves also to EPA compliant
    Some states require non grandfathered non Epa Compliant stoves to be destroyed so that they never find there way back into service. Hopefully for you you live in a state that only requires UL listings If that stove is older that 1979 it is unlisted.
    Have you paid for it yet? Before spending money, you should post questions here and save you not only money but a lot of agrevation. Purchasing first th of something you know little about and then asking questions is afterwards, is not the position one wants to be in, not the way to go. I have posted how to purchase used wood stoves the tell tale sign to look for. How safe is it to use do you know?
  4. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Upload of a pic would be nice......

    You didn't mention how and where you intend to install.

    It very well could be a national brand made under License - like Timberline, Fisher, etc.

    Or simply a copy of same. There were scores of companies making these.

    Elk is right that your insurance or inspector may require proof of testing. Then again, if you are in a relatively rural or unzoned area, they may allow you to install to the "generic" NFPA specs, which would be safe in most instances. These specify wall protection and floor protection (wall is typical 36 inches with no protection, floor depends on leg height).

    craig
  5. Durangoranch

    Durangoranch New Member

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    I don't have any pics yet. When I do I will post them in the gallery. I have no building codes to adhere to as I live on 57 acres in the country, but I am a licenced plumber so I know the codes for Texas. Thanks for the concern. I just can't remember where I saw this stove. I will be having the venting installed by a fireplace company in the area. I want a warranty on the roof penetration. The stove is in great shape and I have no doubt it will heat perfectly. The stove is going to be in our great room. We are going to make the wall with the approved air gap and it will be covered with stone, the floor will have 1" thick flagstone under the stove. It looks just like a rear vent, double door Timberline. The only difference is the picture on the doors. Towards the handles are a group of 3 trees, then a curvy line from upper outside corners to about 1/4 of the door. Under that are the log cabins. It has a screen ledge in front also. The feet are chromed balls.
    Thank you for your input. I hope to have pics soon.
    Spencer
  6. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Might I make a suggestion The 1" stone under it you plan to install has to have thermal resistance
    So that radiant heat does not transfer threw the stone and effect combustibles it sits on.
    One such product is a layer of micore insulation. Many poster here are in a green mindset.
    these older stoves are anything but environmentally friendly, So much so the EPA had to step in in 1990 and mandate
    63% efficiency and limit the grams of pollutant's per hour. ITS at this time many stove companies went out of business.
    Two reasons either they lacked the money for engineering, or they could not bring there stoves up to EPA clean
    The State Of Calif goes one step further, they require existing non Epa stoves to be removed when ever a home is sold
    Epa regs were not adopted by all states Mostly the West coast and Co MT. To name a few. My state left it up to the individual towns as to adoption. Also in those states it is illegal to sell a non EPA compliant stove. I thought it fair to explain and emphasise the need for everyone, to take a responsibility not to scorch our earth. With good dry wood and knowledge and responsible burning
    one can burn older stoves a bit more cleaner. The other concern is that many old stoves were not air tight. Meaning it was hard to control run away fires. Many never had sealed gasketed loading doors. My suggestion is to start smaller fires with some inlet air open at all times, so that you can learn the characteristics of the stove. I checked and TX does subscribe to The International Building and Mechanical Codes. Which does require labeling and listings of all wood stoves. However you area maybe so rural, that there is no inspectors. But I guess a licenced plumber should know. You have to prescribe to the International Plumbing Code don't you?

    What I am trying to say in the nicest terms is I'm not in agreement with putting smoke belching poluting beast back in service.
    As an Nationally certified inspector, My jusisdiction is only in the town or town I am hired in. I enforce the label and listing code, for all of the reasons I mentioned above
  7. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    I am in agreement with Elk. I think it would create unnecessary risk. But I suppose it is up to the owner how much risk they wish to carry. If you are careful and educated about how fire and combustion works you can control the risk. But if unwilling to learn what is really happening in that stove and chimney system you could lose your house. How much will a new house cost? May be less expensive to buy a new stove.

    Of course, this is coming from a stove dealer. So, you may think I am biased. True. But I don't have much to gain from a new stove sale in Texas.

    Be safe,
    Sean
  8. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Great reply elk, and i too agree. If its going back in service, at least its in Texas, the climate is not to bad there and probaby wont be used all the time. You will find if you split your own wood, or buy it, that the new stoves will pay for themselvs with wood savings, weither its your back, or your pocket book. Good luck with the install, where abouts in Texas are you? Im a Galveston native myself.
  9. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Funny thing, when we were all making millions off of those dirty burning stoves, I didn't hear the dealers talking about the excess risk!

    And, I suppose when codes and designs change again in 5-10 years, we will look back to now and say "Wow, I can't imagine you installing that 2100 degree chimney instead of this new 10,000 degree one" (The 10,000 degree one can take a thermonuclear explosion within one mile).

    What I mean to say is that it is all relative. Given a decent class A chimney situation, the largest factor in safety is the user.

    Yes, in a perfect world there would be no smoke-belching trucks, busses, airplanes, old cars, coal power plants, etc. - but we do not live in that world. Until we get there, safety, cleanliness and just about everything else is a matter of degree.

    Speaking of risk, two houses have blown up around here recently - LP gas suspected in both. Complete destructions of the residences and 3 people in very serious condition. I suspect a death or two from the most recent as the injured are quite advanced in age.

    Off subject Elk, but do CO detectors sense the buildup of unburned gases like LP?
  10. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    "Off subject Elk, but do CO detectors sense the buildup of unburned gases like LP?"

    Combustible gases (methane, natural gas and LP) require a different detector but combination CO and combustible gas detectors are available. Really big with the RV crowd. They cost around seventy to eighty bucks.

    Just don't put them too close to the bathroom.
  11. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    Agreed. But I did say "unnecessary" risk. What is available today will lower the risk. Just because it wasn't available twenty years ago does not mean we should ignore it's significance today. I shudder when I think of all the stoves and inserts we have installed in these mountain homes over the years with only a direct connect or into a masnonry chimney with only a terra-cotta flue tile liner. As these homes are sold and new owners take over the operation of the stove the risk just goes sky high. Most of these new owners are city dwellers with absolutley no experience with wood stoves. Damn, makes me ill just typing this!

    We have recently enacted a policy that says we will not install to an unlined masonry flue and we will not service an existing install unless it is upgraded with the proper liner system. We have the numbers of local chimney sweeps and encourage the owners to use the chimney sweeps to keep the system clean. We know some folks think we are being unreasonable to have this policy. After all, we installed it fifteen or twenty years ago. Wasn't it safe then? But we don't budge. If you want us to service your stove you have to upgrade your system. We know more now then we did twenty years ago. And the available products are better than they were twenty years ago (with the exceptions being pawned off on the public by the discounters and big-box companies). Also, the owners twenty years ago were more in touch with what it takes to be a wood stove owner. Many of the city folk today just don't get it. (My apologies to the city folk who do get it).

    And yes, LP has it's own risks, as does any fuel, including electricity. But who would wire or plumb their house with what was available twenty or thirty years ago if there is something better available today? I know there will be many people who cannot afford the latest stuff. Fine. But don't be ignorant. Learn about why the stuff is better. What makes it better? What is safe and what did we learn about safety in the last twenty years? Knowledge - it can save your life and your property.

    Sean
  12. Durangoranch

    Durangoranch New Member

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    I'm sorry, I forgot to explain more about the stove. Both doors have gaskets and the fire box is lined with fire brick. The fireplace installer will be using the UL rated, Dura Vent chimney products to vent the stove through the roof. The "Fireplace Gallery" assured me they would not install the stove if they thought there was any risk. They have been installing fireplaces and stoves in our area for many years. Thank you for your input.
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