1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Very Short Logs, Stacking on End

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by WarmGuy, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    492
    Loc:
    Far Northern Calif. Coast
    I got a great score this week, which will give me about two year's worth of heating. I have a month to buck it and drive it down the street to my house.

    [​IMG]

    That picture just shows one of two big piles, and I'd already removed five truckloads when that picture was taken.

    Here's the thing. I'm getting older, and decided to cut shorter logs. This makes it easier for me to lift them into the truck and (hand) splitting will be a breeze. However, they don't stack well when they are that narrow. Here's how I've stack the rounds:

    [​IMG]

    They'll be like this until I get a chance to split them.

    I'm guessing that they won't dry as well in this configuration. Also, maybe the rain will soak in more if I don't cover the pile.

    What do you think? Have you ever stacked rounds like this?
    chazcarr, milleo, ScotO and 2 others like this.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Michael Golden

    Michael Golden Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Messages:
    272
    Loc:
    Cambridge, Ohio
    That's a lot of cutting!
  3. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,174
    Loc:
    northwest Virginia
    Good job on that score - that's tremendous!

    As for the rounds, I generally don't think wood dries in the round no matter how you stack it. I would split as soon as I can.

    I have started cutting shorter pieces as well. I have a Fisher Papa Bear which can take 30" logs, so I usually try to cut about 14" pieces, and I can fit two in. Much easier to split and load for sure.
  4. Vande

    Vande Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    That's a nice score. I think the open end grain is going to pull in more water as stacked, than the surface grain would if it was stacked typical. But if you can cover it, when you get it split it will be a shorter dry cycle than if it was cut longer.
  5. Gark

    Gark Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Messages:
    808
    Loc:
    SW Michigan
    Nice cache of firewood there. Shorter rounds sure do make for easier lifting and splitting, but the stacking for no logical reason just looks...... unnatural.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    8,426
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    Nice score.

    Any wood you'll need for next year, I'd get it split & stacked first so it's dry when you need it.
    If any of it is oak, give it 2 to 3 years after split & stacked.

    Do what works best for you & your stove.
    My stove likes 17" wood. So I mark & cut 17".

    I agree with you, not gonna dry much the way it's stacked.
    Starts drying after it's split & stacked

    Have never stacked that way.
    I think it'll stack much better when split ;)
  7. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
    Great score! You're gonna be at that for a while.

    Since you have cut them a little short, I think you are right that the stacks may fall over. You could try to "cross-tie" in your rows. What I mean is, you cut a limb ( I have a bunch of 2" dia hedge branches just for this) to the same length as two rows wide. Then when you go to stack them, build in the cross-tie pieces where every you feel its needed to keep the rows supporting each other. I have even built a two row stack and, left a space, and then another two row stack, and crosstied them together as I went up. The point is, that you can help stabilize one row by supporting it with another.
    Like Dave says...
    Also, you can try to keep the fattest end of each split on the outside, so that as you build up the two rows lean IN onto each other. Just a thought.
    ailanthus likes this.
  8. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,452
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    You could put down a couple rows of pallets and just pile the rounds randomly. Might not look as neat in the short term, but the end grain would generally be exposed and the pile would be stable.
  9. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    7,116
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    Good score, but I don't see those rounds drying well like that as your cut ends are being blocked from letting moisture leave by the other rounds.

    If anything, I've found if I want a piece of wood to rot, putting it on end is the way to speed the process up if uncovered.

    If lifting the heavy rounds was the issue, I think cutting to a normal length, the simply whacking them in 1/2 before loading would be a better all around solution.

    In all, I believe you'll be best served if you rethink this approach.

    pen
    save$ and Backwoods Savage like this.
  10. Stax

    Stax Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2010
    Messages:
    944
    Loc:
    Southeastern PA
    Being in "the burbs" wood storage space is important to me. I need quick turnaround times with my wood so I do a little extra stacking. I roll rounds from the pile to the chopping block. Once a decent sized pile of splits are established, I stack them immediately in a pre-staged area. Therefore my wood is stacked the very same day it is split to give me the most amount of seasoning time. Once my current racks are empty, the already stacked wood gets stacked again. It is what I have to do with the space I have. No sense in trying to season a round. Ain't gonna work.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  11. andybaker

    andybaker Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Loc:
    Northwest OH
    Looks like your ready for Dennis to come pay a visit. ==c
    ScotO and Backwoods Savage like this.
  12. amateur cutter

    amateur cutter Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,170
    Loc:
    West Michigan
    Great score! I use Pen's approach of knocking the rounds in 1/2 or even 1/4's to reduce weight & preserve length. Then stack them the "normal" way till I get them spilt. I too think they may not do well on end like that. That being said, do whatever it takes to get that stuff home to use.
    Off subject, I like the safety gear, how do you like those boots? A C
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Loc:
    Michigan
    It is understandable why you are cutting shorter logs and there should be no problem with it except for stacking and loading the stove. However, you can no doubt live with that.

    As for stacking vertically, it will work in the stove but not a good idea outdoors. You no doubt have noticed many times after you cut wood that the ends will crack. Some folks take that to mean the wood is dry. However, all it really means is that the ends are drying and not the center of the wood.

    So I'd suggest getting the wood split as soon as possible to make sure they dry nicely. Don't try to stack the wood very high else it will be a problem for tipping over.

    Also that is great you are getting that wood. The saw looks a bit small but no doubt it is up to the task; just a little slower. Most of us can live with that. Good luck.
    ScotO likes this.
  14. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,174
    Loc:
    Central PA
    I have not had good results stacking rounds the way yours are stacked. They seem to absorb water when stacked vertically. It probably ins't a big deal for a few months, but I would try to get them stacked horizontally ASAP.
    ScotO, andybaker and pen like this.
  15. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
    Genius!
    ScotO likes this.
  16. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    492
    Loc:
    Far Northern Calif. Coast
    I like them. I would like them to be thicker on the front of the ankle.

    I got these on eBay, and they were slightly too large, but I put an extra insole in them, and they're fine. I wouldn't want to hike with them, though.

    For a while I regretted not going larger, but as long as I keep the chain very sharp, it works great. I chose this one because it was lighter and cheaper than the next one up.

    Today I was cutting rounds that were just an inch wider than the bar, but it cut them easily.

    I covered up what I have so far. I've got 2-3 cords, and I'm about halfway done.

    [​IMG]
    amateur cutter likes this.

Share This Page