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Q&A Vigilant II coal stove model 2310

Post in 'Questions and Answers' started by QandA, May 23, 2002.

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  1. QandA

    QandA New Member Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
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    Question:

    Recently I purchased the stove listed as the subject matter from The Firebox in Mays Landing, NJ. Since my stove has been installed, the anthracite coal will not burn. I am able to start a wood fire and add the coal which will burn for a minimal amount of time, but it seems to diminish any base fire that I start. As a prior owner of a woodburning stove, I am capable of starting a substantial fire and have followed all of the directions from both the manual and my dealer that I have been given. The purpose of this e mail is to inquire if there is an additional air intake or blower system that I am able to purchase. I would appreciate any response, for my house has been very cold all winter. I did not expect to have these problems when I purchased the stove; I thought I was making a better investment with this one as opposed to a wood burning stove. Please forward me any information that you have that would help my coal stove operate properly.



    Answer:

    The Vig. Coal 2310 model has a "restrictor plate" underneath the grate area, lower left and to the back. It is held in place with one or two screws. It's purpose is to limit the amount of combustion air when burning sub-bituminous Class B coal, but it must be removed before burning anthracite.

    If the plate has been removed, then the next step is to review how you are starting and tending your fire. Also, another factor is your draft. A very strong draft which allows for excellent wood burning capabilities can be a detriment for burning coal as it pulls air through the combustion zone too quickly so the fuel does not get what it needs to burn properly. Solution: a barometric damper. And, sometimes the draft pulling primary air on that stove can actually bypass the coal bed and go directly to through the secondary chamber, but I don't feel that's occurring here. You may want to have the draft tested by a professional.

    Just remember that coal burning is a real art. Once it's "nailed" down you'll enjoy long burn times, and you do have a good coal burning stove. You may wish to review some of the articles on coal burning for added tips: http://www.hearth.com/what/coaltips.html

    And lastly, you may need your dealer to go on site to see what's happening. I've run into problems such as this before and a quick trip to the home usually resolved it in a short time.

    Link: Coal Tips

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