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Volkwagon Diesel (TDI)

Post in 'The Green Room' started by mbcijim, May 14, 2012.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    As you probably noted, diesel is a lot more expensive in Ireland than it is here. It's more expensive than gasoline here because the rest of the world will pay more for it than we will.

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  2. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    ????? Diesel is a good bit cheaper than gasoline in Ireland. Diesel, and to just a little bit less of an extent, is a good bit more expensive than gasoline in the US. THAT is what I don't understand. I'd expect stuff like refinery capacity, government subsidies, etc, would come into play, but I wouldn't be able to filter out the BS.
  3. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    Not if it's anything to do with the fuel system or ECU. That's one of the primary reasons I won't buy a Diesel Pickup for my wood truck. Granted most repairs are not engine related but when they are they are vastly more expensive.

    Also, never run a Diesel out of fuel.
  4. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    Nope:

    http://www.r3sciences.com/crude_oil_a_breakdown_of_re.html

    You get twice as much gas per barrel of oil (approximately).
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Strawman and not the actual reason why prices for diesel have gone up. The market dictates. Diesel prices have gone up in the US primarily because refineries are getting better prices overseas. The Keystone XL pipeline will feed refineries that are set up for export, not US consumption.

    http://www.factcheck.org/2008/05/diesel-fuel-and-gasoline-costs/
  6. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    Actually the very article shows that the market does not really dictate prices but rather regulatory compliance and taxes does. However there also is some effect from the fact that less diesel is produced on the cracking tower as well. I would imagine that the global demand for diesel also plays some part, but I'm betting far less than regulatory compliance and taxes.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That is a factor, but not the main cause:

    "Finally, higher federal taxes account for 6 cents per gallon of the price difference at the pump. Gasoline is taxed at 18.4 cents per gallon, and diesel at 24.4 cents per gallon. That’s been true for years and explains why diesel has sold for an average of 1.3 percent more than gasoline over the time period covered by the EIA’s figures. It does not explain why the spread has gotten so wide recently, however. Again, the main factor is demand."
  8. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Why?

    Other than having to bleed the system, which isn't difficult, it's not an issue.

  9. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Your paying through the nose for a technician that specializes in diesels to work on your car/truck. And yeah some parts of diesels are quite a bit more $$ than the "equivalent" gas part (Fuel Injectors come to mind) but a lot of the really high dollar items like injection pumps have come down in price and gotten even more reliable.

    The 7.3L Powerstrokes in 1995?-2003 Ford pickups were a 15qt oil change. _g Granted it was a longer interval but still....

    Right now with fuel prices the way they are, unless you need the extra capability of the diesel (most OEM's axe'd their big gas engines. :() or drive a ton of miles, you're right on about sticking with a gasser.

    As far as running out of fuel, most newer diesels, even on off-road machinery, are self-bleeding. Not the nightmare job of changing filters, pre-filling the new ones and re-bleeding the system that it used to be with the older construction equipment.
  10. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    Exactly why I chose a 3/4 Ton gas pickup (F250). I was able to find one with relatively low miles on 460-V8. It has a carburetor, but a recent rebuild done on the carb and it starts and runs beautifully. I drive maybe 1k miles a year with it. Best thing is since we don't use salt here there is no rust to speak of on the rig, which is great. I'm not looking forward to changing the belts though, there is something to be said for the serpentine drive belt system.
  11. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I'll take your belts anyday over most FWD cars.
  12. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I ran a Ford 460 for a while. Got 8-9mpg while towing a trailer, 35-40mph at near WOT while pulling grades. My diesel Ram 2500 hooked to same trailer gets 12-13mpg, and I can hold the speed limit without trouble.

    Used my bosses 6.0L gas 2500 GMC last week to haul my trailer, I burned through 30 gallons of fuel in 275 miles :eek:

    The other thing too is at 200-300k on that gas motor, it's getting pretty long in the tooth. The diesel still has another 200-300k left in it if treated right.
  13. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Can't seem to edit (something about a java error?) but wanted to add it doesn't really matter on ecomoney if your just putting around town with it, but I USE my truck for hauling all over the place. This weekend I'm running my race car at a track that is about 5 hours north, about a 600 mile round trip drive. Just a short trip so to speak compared to other places I have been over the years.

    BUT 600 miles at 13mpg in the diesel vs 9mpg in a gas truck is a savings of about $65 in fuel with today's fuel prices. That covers my fees to get into the race!
  14. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    I only haul firewood, home repair projects and the occasional trailer though. How long would it take me to pay back at 1000 miles per year? For most people a Diesel truck will not pay back and that's my point.Diesels are not the end all solution, the type of use needs to play into equation.

    For a daily driver I have a 1995 Corolla that I drive that gets 33 mpg.
  15. 3fordasho

    3fordasho Feeling the Heat

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    I've had my 2012 Jetta sportwagen tdi for about a month now, almost a 1000 miles on it. First new car purchase in 35years of driving. Mine has the 6 speed and the epa estimates put the MPG maybe 1-2mpg better than the DSG (auto) version. I've been pleasantly suprised to see 38-39mpg in town driving, a vast improvement over the 20mpg (in town) I was getting in my Subaru WRX. The WRX was quite a bit smaller inside and the AWD cost some mpg's as well.
    The turbo kick in the WRX was a thrill but to be honest the tdi is as fun to drive and the diesel torque is much more usable for my type of driving anyway. Very happy with the purchase so far.

  16. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

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    I'm sure having to use premium in the WRX didn't help the costs either.
  17. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Funny I sold a 300+ hp WRX with an STI motor about 2 years ago for my diesel Jetta. The WRX was a blast to drive but it only got about 22-23mpg on sumpreme fuel. The Jetta doesn't have the same power, but it still gets along ok and I'm not complaing about 45mpg either!

    I did end up "replacing" the WRX this year with a Lotus Elise which gets close to 30mpg and can run on reg fuel if need be.

    As far as the diesel trucks, I have owned several over the years (never owned a gas truck actually) and I've never paid much of a premium over a gas 3/4-1 ton truck of similar year. Brand new the diesels are :eek::eek: though!
    The one I have now is a 98 2500 Ram, it's got 225,000 miles and I haven't had to do too much work to it other than a couple alternators, rebuild the trans (given with an auto trans), and replace a few weeping gaskets/seals here and there.
  18. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Wow, a Lotus in Alaska?! >> Get any stares with that? ;)
  19. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Yeah just a few. Lot of people think it's some top dollar supercar, not a Toyota Corolla with some fancy fiberglass and aluminum.

  20. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I'll take a Corolla wearing a Lotus suit any day.

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