weight good indication of btu's?

salmonhunter Posted By salmonhunter, Oct 7, 2012 at 11:15 PM

  1. salmonhunter

    salmonhunter
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    Apr 16, 2012
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    Well im not very familiar with all the different kinds of trees I have cut this past spring. So im wondering is the weight of the splits is a good way to figure out the available btu's. Like I noticed that the white birch I cut seems heavier then some other kinda trees I cut at the same time in april. Im thinking the lighter splits would be better for burning now while its not so cold then save the heavier birch and unknown species for the colder weather. Or maybee the heavier species just haven't shed as much water. I dunno.
     
  2. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Weight with fresh cut does not mean scodush! Willow and cotton wood 2 examples! ;) Bad @ass saw with a great chain and finer saw dust will always tell the story! :cool:
     
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  3. TreePointer

    TreePointer
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    If you are conparing fully seasoned wood or better yet, kiln dried wood, then I think it's a fair generalization to state that the heaver wood (greater density is a better term) will have more BTU's per unit volume. The problem is that some species season (lose cellular moisture) much faster than others.

    If you search the Internet, there are charts that compare wood BTU's with density.
     
  4. onetracker

    onetracker
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    what he said
     
  5. krex1010

    krex1010
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    As was mentioned the weight of wood when green means very little, some trees are water hogs and some are not. But if you are comparing two woods with the same moisture content then I believe weight can indicate the heavier wood having higher btus.
     
  6. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    I agree you can't judge wood by weight unless you know all of the wood is equally well seasoned. The simplest thing is to get a moisture meter and check. Your wood will not be all equally dry. You cut it only six months ago, and that is not enough time to season it fully, especially since you live in Eastern Canada, not the driest or hottest place to season firewood.
     
  7. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
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    Soft maple and black cherry will weigh a lot more than ash when green, but they both have lower btu content, by volume, than the ash. As krex said, some species just hold more water than others. Other than looking it up on some table (which is what I recommend), dry is the only way to know.
     
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    For sure. Compare 1 year old oak to 1 year old soft maple!!! But if both species of wood is at the same moisture content after drying, then the softer woods will be lighter.
     
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  9. red oak

    red oak
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    Yes wood could be sold by weight if not for all the water inside it!
     

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