wet wood?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by micaaronfl, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Place a wanted add on CL for dry wood <25% moisture content. Say your stove is very peticular.
    Mention in the add that you will randomly sample the splits (before delivery) with your moisture meter.
    Mention that you are willing to pay more for dry <25% mc hard wood.
     
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  2. micaaronfl

    micaaronfl
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    thanks i will try it.
     
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  3. ddklahr

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    I am curious what anybody's thoughts are on this...

    I have some Ash, Hickory and locust that I have stored for next year but it appears I may need some extra wood this year depending upon the rest of this winter. The moisture content on it ranges from 13% up to 18%. It was split in December but had been logged up since July. Think it is okay to start mixing in with my dry wood that is around 8-12% in moisture?
     
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  4. Kenster

    Kenster
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    Are you measuring the moisture content from inside of a freshly split round? If you're getting true 13% - 18% moisture content then you are sitting golden, Sir. But if you are measuring from the outside of the round, or on the end, or an old split that has not been resplit then you are not getting an accurate read. I would be amazed to see you get 13-18% on hickory that has only been split for one year. But if your numbers are good you've got some great wood to burn by itself, or combined with your 8-12% wood. Anything 20% or under is considered good to go.

    If you do burn out of next years stack be sure to replace it now so that it will, hopefully, be burnable next winter.
     
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  5. ddklahr

    ddklahr
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    I am measuring from the inside and not out on the ends. It surprised me to, especially the hickory. I think I will keep mixing at this point and see how it continues. I have burned a couple of batches in the stove by mixing it and it seems to be doing really good. As far as the replacement of it, I think that is a continuous process. I find myself eyeballing trees to cut down every time I head out to the pasture for future wood supply. This wood I am burning came out of a 3/8 of a mile tree line that needed fence replacement. Dozer layed it out for us to log out and take to the house for chunking and splitting. It sure beats worrying which way the tree is going to fall!
     
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  6. pen

    pen
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    If gas weren't 3.20 a gallon I'd bring you a truck load down but it's a 2.5 hour drive for me. Damn I could go for a Hershel's pastrami sandwich or a DiNic's roast pork sandwich. mmmm

    glad you found your problem though. You won't believe the difference next winter. Why not clean the chimney yourself? Is it tough access? Really steep roof? Really tall chimney above the roof?

    pen
     
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