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what do I need? dont laugh

Post in 'The Gear' started by Andy99, Jun 29, 2008.

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  1. kshultz

    kshultz New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    Loc:
    Southern NH
    Full chain saw gear is pretty cheap and can be found online easily. Helmet w/ ear muffs, full chaps, and chain saw gloves. I was always afraid of chain saws so that is what I did. I feel like I'm protected. OH, yes the chaps really do save your legs, thighs, I found out a couple years ago. Take good care of your gear & you will have it for years to come. I keep all of my gear & the chain sharpening equip. in a back pack just for my wood cutting times. I touch up my chain ervery tank or two, gives my back a good break.

    On the wood splitting, I have done a lot by hand. As little as an hour a day you will be amazed at how much you can accomplish! This year I had 6 cord log length delivered & am renting a splitter for my brother & I.

    There are some good publications online you can download for cutting & splitting. Good luck, it will grow on you!

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  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    Most of the gear is pretty reasonable I'll agree - figure around $40-50 for helmet w/ muffs and screen, $50-70 for chaps, and about $25 for the chainsaw gloves...

    (Note when purchasing - at least at my local hardware store, there are lots of fancy gloves with the Husky and Stihl names printed on them that are NOT "chainsaw gloves" - but merely standard work gloves or fairly ordinary "technical" gloves with the name on them to make you pay more... Be sure that what you are getting are REALLY chainsaw gloves...)

    What really kills you on the price when purchasing gear are the chainsaw BOOTS... If you look at the OSHA injury stats, there are a LOT of foot injuries reported, and many of them are to the top of the foot, an area not protected by a steel toe. Steel toes are probably better than nothing, especially if you drop a log on your toe :red: but are NOT adequate protection per OSHA standards, and they do have the evidence that backs up the requirement for the boots. The so-called "Logger boots" offered by many work shoe companies are NOT chainsaw boots, they just ordinary boots. A chainsaw boot, like chaps, has added layers of kevlar or other material that is intended to jam the chain and stop the saw - this adds a considerable amount to the cost of the boot and will be advertised if present.

    Keep in mind that feet, like hands, are very complex from a biomechanical standpoint - and fairly easily damaged - a foot injury is likely to be VERY difficult to put back together simply because there are a great many bones, tendons, etc. involved. Looking at the Injury Rate Figures, I think that boots are well worth the money they cost in terms of the injury exposure they are protecting against... I would rank them right up with chaps in importance, probably ahead of gloves.

    When I was shopping for boots, I found three-four main classes of boots - for about $50-100 there were some european boots with very poor descriptions, and which looked like a heavy duty version of the green rubber boots many of us probably wear when shoveling snow... Looked really uncomfortable, for wearing very long, and while they meet standards, they didn't say how well they did so...

    Labonville makes a kevlar boot liner intended to be worn inside a pair of oversized workboots - only $35, but when you add in the cost of a new pair of steel toe work boots (one size larger than what you normally wear) they weren't likely to save you much... The few reviews on them implied that they were also rather uncomfortable, and only marginally effective as protective gear.

    Next were the Labonville Boots for about $165 - nice looking, but fairly low, and only 4 layers of kevlar. They appeared to be water resistant, but not water proof. However they had several good reviews on them, and I gave them serious consideration.

    Then I found these Matterhorn Boots - 10" high instead of 8" - Seven layers of Kevlar instead of four, Waterproof Gore-tex liner, etc. definitely looked like a better boot but NOT cheap... Look to spend around $275 or more for these, but the quality is definitely top notch, and I will say that aside from feeling a bit like Frankenstein feet because of the size and weight of all the protection, they are the most comfortable boots I have EVER owned. Highly reccomended.

    Gooserider
  3. kenskip1

    kenskip1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    160
    Loc:
    Coleman Texas
    Any99,
    I agree with many of the previous posts. However one thing that I did not notice.When splitting have you block on a good solid surface. A lawn or any type of soft ground will absorb the impact of the maul. Sort of like a shock absorber.I have split my share of wood while in NY. Use some good judgment, and take a rest often.Buy the way, what part of NY are you in? I lived in Oneida county, near Rome for over 20 years. Best of luck, Ken
  4. timfromohio

    timfromohio Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    517
    "Important note - it is best to save the cold beer for AFTER the splitting - just because you are seeing two rounds at a time instead of one does NOT mean you are splitting twice as much wood per swing… "

    Yes, have the beers after splitting as you sit back, admire your handiwork, and think of relaxing by your stove in the winter (perhaps with a beer in hand then as well?)
  5. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    If you lived closer I'd give you a couple day's seminar on splitting here at my house. No better way to learn than by doing, eh?

    I love the exercise. I have a splitter, but do a lot by hand anyway. It's sort of a dependence thing, I think :)
  6. Andy99

    Andy99 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    159
    Loc:
    NY
    Thanks for all the great advice. I was away for the long 4th weekend. Ken I live on Long Island But My Family has a camp on Oneida Lake. Thats were I went for the long weekend. I need to do a little shopping. I will let you all know what I get.
  7. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
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    3,700
    Loc:
    CNY
    We're only 5 miles from Sylvan Beach at the east end of Oneida Lake...welcome back. With my arm being in a cast I could have schooled you in proper cutting and splitting techniques and watched you do it correctly from the safely of my lawn chair. BWWAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
  8. Andy99

    Andy99 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    159
    Loc:
    NY
    Sylvan Beach is where I was. Im up there a couple time per summer. Spent the weekend out on the lake on a friends boat.


    I stacked and split a face cord today with a wedge and a sledge hammer and WOW am I sore...
  9. kenskip1

    kenskip1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    160
    Loc:
    Coleman Texas
    Andy99,
    I am most familiar with Oneida lake. I went ice fishing their years ago. I did wonderful! I caught 35 pounds of ICE! Ken in warm, low taxes, and friendly people Texas.
  10. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
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    3,700
    Loc:
    CNY
    Andy next time you come up PM me and we'll hook up and you check out my wood operation...I'm only about 10 min from the beach through the swamp if you turn east by the Spaghetti factory...

    ...I should be fully operational by then so no splitting for you I was only joking about that.
  11. Andy99

    Andy99 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    159
    Loc:
    NY
    I would love to come check it out. I will drop you a line next time I'm there...
  12. carbon neutral

    carbon neutral Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Messages:
    301
    Loc:
    S.E. Connecticut
    Get a log splitter! I lived on long island and when I was there free wood was in abundance, unfortunately it was often really large rounds or hard to spit knotty rounds. Look in the penny save if you get that and you will see advertisements from tree trimming companies offering free firewood. I know you said money is a factor but had you not purchased the 3 cords of wood and applied that money to the purchase of the splitter you would be half way to the purchase price of the splitter. If you decide a splitter or burning wood does not work for you you can always sell the thing and usually get most of your money back. Another idea is look for someone you can share the splitter with. A few posts down from here and you will see a fellow long islander is looking to buy a splitter, if you guys can work out an arrangement you may be able to go halves on the cost of the splitter. I put off buying a splitter and regret it.
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