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What happens when a Hydraulic Wood Splitter encounters wood it will not split?

Post in 'The Gear' started by snowfreak, Nov 25, 2005.

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  1. snowfreak

    snowfreak New Member

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    Loc:
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    I imagine this question may differ for different types of Hydraulic Wood splitters. Say on a gas unit does the piston just stall and go into a bypass mode? Or does the engine stall? How about on an electric model?

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Can't tell ya. My "baby" twenty ton gas unit has never done worse than kick down to second stage and then it split wood just this side of rock hardness.

    Now that said, when it does kick down stand yourself back because when that sucker splits something is going to fly somewhere. Not the time to be sitting on a stump facing the splitter with your knees spread. Unless you want to be doing a real good Frankie Vallie impression.

    Bit of advice for those hard splits. When the wedge bogs down treat it like a maul. Stop the split and then give it succesive "shots" down. Pull the handle. Stop. Pull the handle. Stop. Just like beating on it with a maul. Splits without violent things happening that you do not want to be around for.
  3. hosspuller

    hosspuller Member

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    Most log splitter valves have a relief valve built-in. At set pressure the valve opens relieving the oil from the piston. For real information, install a gauge in the line. I'd say a zero to 10,000 psi.
    (That's what I have) The pressure never exceeds 3,000 psi
  4. bruce

    bruce Member

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    long pond pa
    never had one give up
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I have A 12 now 16 ton electric splitter Power requirements 20 amp circuit operating at close to 3000 PSI
    Like with any tool, one should learn how to use it and know it's limitations. If one knows the log will be problematic, why force something. I just cut it up with a chain saw. This splitter will take up to 24" wide by 20" long. Quite amazing what it will split. It has split everything I have feed it. Yeah it may have kicked down but keeps on going. So far split over 3 cords since Mid OCT. Right now it is located 200' from the 20 amp plug and works fine. I have had it up to 250' away and it works fine. This is not one of those Omega or DR splitters, but a real splitter with Barns hydro pump. The Electric motor can be swapped with up to a Honda 5.5hp gas motor. Swap time about 10 minutes. It is so quiet, nobody in the neighborhood knows you are splitting wood Throw the switch and split. Not using it, switch it off no need to keep it running, like the gas splitters. I believe the most powerfull electric splitter in the market place today
  6. snowfreak

    snowfreak New Member

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    Loc:
    Altona, NY
    Sounds like your talking about the Ramsplitter out of North Carolina. If that's the one your talking about it most certainly seemed to be the toughest electric one out there. They appear to have a well built line of splitters. I am quite used to splitting wood with the chainsaw. When it comes to the huge rounds or the stubborn ones I break out the Husqvarna (chainsaw) wood splitter. I especially like the curly chips that it leaves when cutting with the wood grain, I still chuckle a bit to see the chips flying 25 ft through the air.
  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    My electric splitter


    Check the picture below this is not an integrated unit. It has a separate Barns Hydro 11gpm Pump. 4 way splitting valve Meaning two speeds forward, fast speed for easy splitting, which automatically kicks back to slower speed for tough splitting. It also has automatic return to the closed position. Of special attention is the hydro pump. Brand name Barns. The reservoir took over 3 gallons to fill, not a couple pints in the integrated electric units.
    The pump is capable of delivering more tons of splitting force. It can easily support 20 plus tons. If I change the cylinder to 3.5 “ = 16 tons to a 4” 20 plus tons The Hydro valve can be set to work at a higher PSI squeezing more force to split. The motor is wired for 110 volts rated 1.5 hp. It can be wired for 220 and produce 2 hp. I also could swap to a 2 hp 110-volt motor. Finally as I said earlier I can swap the electric motor to a gas one, a B&S 3.5 hp all the way up to a Honda 5.5. Should I find it not powered enough to complete the tasks? I do have a path to upgrade it for more power.

    So far it has split everything I have feed it. When I reviewed the 4-ton Ryobi, It could not split a 8” by 12” American Rock Elm.
    For those who have tried to split American Rock Elm, they know just how hard it is, stringy, knarly. Using an 8 lb maul got me nowhere, after repeated blows. The only thing that happened is my elbows got numb. I no longer have that test piece it’s split, so is the 14 by 16” piece as well. 3 cords later it has handled everything I feed it All my American Rock Elm has been split. I made some modifications, since I bought the splitter. Not that it needed them; it worked fine, At 12 tons. First I adjusted the hydro valve to approach 3000 PSI. and also swapped out the Hydro cylinder to 16+ tons. The pump and valve will support up to 25 tons but I wanted to take it the next level just to see if there was more it can do. Right now pushing 16+ tons splitting everything in sight. Real easy to start just throw the switch. Quietness, all gas splitter owner ever experienced. No sucking in gas fumes, no hard starting, power on demand. Limited to being attached to an electrical cord and 20 amp. circuit. Limited power, as gas engines can deliver more power.
    Gas splitters have freedom not having an electrical wire attached. With this splitter setup I can swap engines as I had mentioned.
    The best of both worlds



    Technical Details

    If one wants the most powerful electric splitter consider the ram splitter 12 tons with real serious components.

    Motor Marathon
    Model Number: 56B17F5302Catalog Number: G378
    Product Type: CAP START CAP RUNNormally Stocked: YES
    Enclosure: TEFCList Price: $326
    Frame: 56HMultiplier Symbol: F1
    Dimensional Drawing A-100113-856 PDF
    Dimensional Drawing A-100113-856 DXF Connection Diagram 102006-52 PDF
    Connection Diagram 102006-52 DXF
    HP: 1.5Frequency (HZ): 60
    Speed (RPM): 1800Mounting: RIGID
    Phase: 1Motor Wt: 41
    Volts: 115/208-230Insulation Class: B
    F.L. Amps: Duty: CONTINUOUS 15.2 8.6 -7.6
    Service Factor: 1.15Max. Ambient: 40
    Bearing: BALL/BALLF.L. Eff.:
    DE Bearing: NONEThermal Protection: MANUAL
    OPE Bearing: NONEKVA Code: J
    Footnotes: Capacitor Start/Capacitor Run design for reduced amperage
    Performance/Certification Data
    Ball bearing Heavy gauge steel frame and base
    Capacitor start design for high starting torque 1.15 Service factor
    UL Recognized and CSA Certified

    Barns11GPM 2 Stage Hydraulics Pump gives you faster cycle times

    Log Splitter Detent Valve Pre set to 2250 PSI adjustable to 3000 psi
    4 way valve fast speed for easy splitting slower speed for more pressure. Automatic kick back to closed position when stroke is completed

    Prince 3000 PSI Hydraulic Cylinder 3” 18.5” stroke

    3 Gallon Hydraulic Reservoir.

    Log splitting capacity 24” round by 20” length

    http://www.ramsplitter.com/Contact.html

    Attached Files:

  8. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Nice review Elk... Just one thing I was wondering about. You state 3.5 = 16, ton 4" = 20 ton. That seems backward. The smaller the piston, the more PSI delivered out of the same pump.

    Well, you know me and Elm >:-(, but nice to hear what you have will split it. There's tons of dead Elm around here, and I'd probably go after more of it if I could split it. I use a 6 lb maul, and I can split all other wood, and very dry frozen Elm also.

    Yes, Dry helps a LOT, so does Frozen with Elm.

    But as you said the 4 ton Ryobi will not split Elm. It also has the habit of not keeping the wood in place unless the rounds are cut perfectly square to the length. That seems like a big issue with it. Otherwise, it's a nice little splitter for smaller duty...let's say up to 12" logs if it's maple, Ash or some other easily split wood.
  9. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    if smaller pistons delivered more hydro force I supose my bachhoe boom pistion should be 1" instead of 6"
    Really cannot fathom it ripping out stumps with a 1" piston
    Actuall burning some Rock elm tonight.
    You are right about the ryobi and the Elm not a susessfull opperation no can do
  10. annette

    annette Member

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    Elk, your splitter is only about $25 more than the Ryobi, but you just recommended the Ryobi in that other post. Why?
  11. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Hi Annette,

    The ryobi is about $300 and the ramsplitter is $985. Over 3 times the price. Check the website: www.ramsplitter.com.

    Carpniels
  12. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    The simple answer is that if the ram encounters something it can't split, the bypass valve in the hydraulic spool valve should open and vent excess pressure back to the hydraulic tank. More complexly - If the bypass valve is inoperable or missing, the pressure will build until one of four things happens - the wood finally splits, something in the system ruptures from excess hydraulic pressure, leakage past the hydraulic cylinder seals becomes equal to pump volume and the cylinder just stops w/ the prime mover (engine, motor, etc) still turning, or pressure builds to a point where the prime mover stalls.

    Elk - Warren

    You are both somewhat right...a smaller piston (or rotor volume) on the pump will allow higher pressure for a given input power. However, a larger piston on the ram will allow more force out. Very similar to a gear or sprocket assembly.

    Corey
  13. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Annette the bold price is just the list price of the motor not the entire splitter I paid $740- delivered.

    I used bold to point out this is no cheap motor not the common Sears type for benchsaws. This is a real serious comercial motor
  14. annette

    annette Member

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    Oh, I see. Now all is clear. Thanks, Elk.
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