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What sort of pipe do I need? stove pipe?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Jake, Dec 29, 2005.

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  1. Jake

    Jake Member

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    I bought a "boxwood " stove today for the garage / workshop.

    What kind of pipe do I need? Menards sells a 6" black pipe and some 3" "pellet" pipe that is about 6 the cost.

    what size pipe do I need?


    heres what I got: http://www.vogelzang.com/bx26e.htm


    I loked at tyhe site, I need 6 inch pipe, I think, but what kind? nd where do I buy it?

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  2. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    What kind of wall inside/outside of the shop?
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    You need class A insulated chimney of 6" inside diameter. This is usually a brand like Duravent, Security, Excell, Metalbestos, etc, - it will cost more than the stove.

    Note: if your garage is attached it may not be legal to install a stove there. Also if you store and use combustibles like gaoline, etc. Be sure to confirm with local codes.
  4. joshuaviktor

    joshuaviktor New Member

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    Northwest New Jersey
    Elk, you want to direct him to the New Guys Stove post, or do you still have your ebay auction on tap? Elk, dammit, elk, don't leave us!!! I'm losing him! Get a non-cat stove with 24 inches of clearance, stat!! And 30 feet of class a chimney! IV Push!
  5. annette

    annette Member

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    Jake, in case you haven't been reading other posts and articles on this site, you've just bought a stove that somehow is allowed to be sold with the other wood stoves, although it doesn't meet EPA standards, and maybe there's a question about it passing UL tests? Because your stove is airtight, you are able to reduce the air enough to make it only smolder, polluting your neighborhood pretty badly. If you feed it enough air, the hotter burn will be cleaner.

    As mentioned above, it isn't safe to have an open flame around flammables, so if you are storing such things in your garage, better take the stove back!

    Your manual should give you infomation on the size pipe and chimney to use, but the internal diameter of the pipe you need is the same as the internal diameter of the flue collar. If the flue collar isn't round, better check the manual for the size they want. You need the right diameter pipe so your stove drafts properly. I'm pretty sure that 3" won't do. Also, pipe specifically for pellet stoves may not be rated for the same temperature? The pipe you buy must be listed for use with a wood stove. Look in the manual for a minimum chimney height, too, and add extra if you are using any angled connectors to get around obstacles.

    You can use single-wall or double-wall pipe up to 2" from the ceiling or about the same distance from the wall (if you're venting out the wall), and then you have to switch to Class A chimney. Single-wall stovepipe needs to be 18" away from the wall, whether it's made of drywall, wood, etc. Double-wall can be 6" away. You will need to keep papers, fabric etc. at least 36" away from your stove. Class A chimney has 2" clearances.

    You can read about the different types of chimney and stovepipe on www.hartshearth.com, or www.ventingpipe.com, or others.

    I hope that helped!
  6. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Hey Jake
    Don't take offense to some of us goofing around a bit. Maybe too much holiday light heartedness (light headedness?).

    Annette has provided some decent info, that likely some of the rest of us could or should have. All in all though, it points out that buying a wood stove is a big step that requires a lot of thought and research. You've maybe put the cart before the horse a little bit by buying the stove before asking for help and information, but at least you've come to the right place to maybe help you through the rest of it.

    Willhound
  7. Jake

    Jake Member

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    THanks for the info Annette,


    The garage is unnattached and no flammables are kept in it (basically just a woodshop) All flammables and what not are located in the garage attached to the house.

    I am going to run 6" pipe. as far as the epa listing, I dont really care how much wood I burn through, as I'm only gonna use this while I'm, in the shop, SO, I can run the thing with the door wide open, for a hotter burn.

    I have been reading this forum for about 2 months, and have gathered alot of info, I plan on buying an insert for the house (for next season) and I bought this little stove for the shop cause I wanted a cheap heat source.
  8. joshuaviktor

    joshuaviktor New Member

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    Jake,

    The EPA listing is mentioned around here because of the efficiency, so it means less wood hauling, and wringing the most out of every erg of muscle power used to cut split, stack, and move wood. However, it is also important to note that the EPA rating also means you will not be choking your neighbors out of their house with fine particles, nasty smoke, and flying sparks. Flying sparks also mean that you have to be careful about your house, whether this garage is attached or unattached, flying bits of flame can go pretty darn far.

    If you run it with the door wide open, you are inviting a chimney fire to take up residence, with the correspondingly higher risk of flying sparks, burning the house down, yada yada yada.

    Look man, your life, health, and safety is your business. I believe in personal choice, and personal freedom, obssesively. But your neighbors and family need to be in your thoughts too. Good luck. God bless.

    Not trying to offend, but I'll probably manage it.

    Joshua
  9. Jake

    Jake Member

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    Joshua,

    Are you saying I should not run the stove at all? if so, I'm looking for cheap way to heat my shop. (thinking wood as its FREE, otherthan me hauling it home once and a awhile)
  10. roac

    roac New Member

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    Jake,

    Not sure what Joshua was talking about when he mentioned sparks flying through the neighborhood. Let me correct some of the things mentioned previously. The stove you bought is not an airtight stove, it is an epa exempt stove. This means the stove lacks the ability to finely control the air draft to the stove. Do not run that stove with the door open, it's not necessary and is dangerous. Not sure how much stove pipe you will need but Lowes sells black 6" stove pipe for about 5 or 6 dollars per 2ft. section. You will run this from the stove until you come within 18" of a flammable surface. Then you need chimney pipe from there through the roof and at least 3ft. above the roof. The chimney pipe comes in 3ft sections and is around 60$ a section. (Google "how to install a class A chimney") You will need a chimney cap/spark arrester, roof flashing, storm collar etc. The google search will tell ya the specifics. Just promise everyone here that you won't sleep in there or leave a fire unattended... :-/ When you have it set up, let the stove run hot don't damper it down. A hot fire and stove burn most of the smoke so the neighbors will leave you alone. Also make sure and get a stove thermometer to keep it in that optimum burn area.
  11. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    As long as you have an insulated chimney, the stove should be fine and relatively safe to run in the way you want to. Yes, EPA exempt means it CANNOT burn super-low, but this is what you want anyway. It will also assure a clean and efficient fire.

    Bottom line, with a straight up insulated chimney and proper installation, this stove could be as safe as anything out there.

    Of course, hopefully no one has to warn you about contact cement, stain, laquer thinner and all those other things that can create fumes which ignite. Same for lots of sawdust around the stove...a no-no.

    The garage is not attached - I think even Elk will survive this one.
  12. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Class A - Stainless Steel - Some Box stores like Lowes may sell it, also plumbing and heating places as well as fireplace stores.
  13. Jake

    Jake Member

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    thanks, ya'll had me worried, And Again, it's only while i'm out there, So, i'll be monitoring it
  14. roac

    roac New Member

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    Fluebug,

    You must of missed this post. He has a seperate attached garage. The building he is putting it into is an unattached shop. The definition of garage is...

    ga·rage Pronunciation (g-räzh, -räj)
    n.
    1. A building or indoor space in which to park or keep a motor vehicle.
    2. A commercial establishment where cars are repaired, serviced, or parked.

    Since he doesn't park cars in it, it isn't a garage it is a shop. Problem solved.
  15. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    ************************************************************************************
    Helloooooo! Did you miss my post?

    Sec. 9-2.4 “Solid fuel burning appliances shall not be installed in any residential garage”. (it doesn’t say attached or un-attached, it says, ANY

    -----------------------------------------


    I agree that the key there is obviously if the building is used for storage of cars...

    So, outbuildings, shops and tack rooms are OK.
  16. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually, the discussion is quite useful and valid. There is no "HE" that has the final word. The whole reason for most fire codes is so that one does not endanger human life. Secondary reasons are property, etc. but that does not figure as highly as human life.

    IMHO, the gentleman has an outbuilding....plain and simple. He also did not ask us how many various authorities he should see about his stove. He asked about the proper chimney and I think we led him in the right direction with both that and with the safety issue of attached garages or other places that house cars and flammables.

    If, for some strange reason, my local inspector said that an outbuilding was a garage (and it was not) - I would first question him, then I would go right up the chain of command. Sometimes the state can help, others times an appeal board.

    However, in this case I didn't even hear the gentleman ask about permits, etc. This is 150% his business. Many jurisdictions would not even require a permit for certain outbuilding mods.

    I've seem good building inspectors and I've seen bad ones. One thing for sure about government, ask enough people and the answer is always NO. It's easier that way! Only once did I have to go to the board of appeals for the building official - it was for a oil/wood boiler. The appeals panel laughed that building inspector right out of the hearing and they told him not to stop at the bar on the way home!

    Leave it up to the government and eventually all wood stoves will be illegal, as will chain saws and anything else that is dangerous and causes less oil to be burned.

    I have figured out the perfect way to make certain everyone is 100% safe with their wood, gas and pellet stoves:
    DON'T INSTALL ONE.....

    Of course, then the electric and LP heaters will be burning down the houses and outbuildings.
  17. Jake

    Jake Member

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    I've decided against installing this stove.
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