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Where does Poplar fall in the BTU chart

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Cudos, Aug 26, 2009.

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  1. JotulOwner

    JotulOwner Feeling the Heat

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  2. EDGE

    EDGE New Member

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    Up there in central Alberta you might also have balsam poplars. We have them down here in northern ND. The trees resemble aspens and grow in the same habitats, though the balsams seem to be commoner on the damper ground. Aspens have rounded leaves but the balsams leaves are shaped like spear heads. The bark looks like that on a young cottonwood and it actually is a close relative of the cottonwood. But the wood is even lighter in weight. A book I have reports aspen at 25.1, cottonwood at 24.2, and balsam poplar at 22.7 pounds per cubic foot. Paper birch at 37.1.
  3. mn_jon

    mn_jon Member

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    we have a ton of popple up here. I like it because it grows faster than I can seem to cut it, which makes limitless firewood. It dries light and easy to carry. It's easy to split and has few horizontal branches, and no sap (like the pines). The downside seems to be that it is very wet wood and takes time to dry. Also it seems to soak up water like a sponge, meaning I have to cover it to keep it dry. But mostly it is quick burning easy firewood.



    Jon
  4. Steamer

    Steamer Member

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    I cut on my own property and cut just standing dead and blow downs so I have burned some poplar.
    Burns fast, smells awful and throws a lot of sparks but if another blows down it is worth burning.
  5. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I just leave them for the woodpeckers unless one falls on my lawn.
  6. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I read fast, so I may have misunderstood.

    What I think I learned is:
    1) some call Aspin (softwood) Poplar it is a softwood
    2) some call poplar tulip poplar and it is a hardwood

    Did I miss something?

    We have huge tulip poplar trees in NJ, and they are hardwood.
  7. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Technically, softwoods are evergreens like Spruce, Pine, Fir, etc. Poplar and Aspen are hardwoods but compared to other hardwoods, they are less dense than Elm, Ash, Oak, etc.
  8. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, we don't have any Aspin around here, I was thinking it is a softwood. I lived in Colorado many years ago and do now recall the Aspin in the mountains and the fall colors...not that I was in to looking a fall colors at the age I was back then.
  9. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    around here nobody calls it poplar ,you have quaking (or bigtooth)aspen and it sucks to burn ,not even suitable for a campfire IMHO.it is a member of the poplar family of trees ,then theres the tulip tree ,its not poplar at all ,it is a member of the magnolia family of trees and it is usually a big tall tree and has leaves (and blossoms)that look like tulips and the aspen looks like paper birch with small round leaves that "quake" in the wind and flutter.neither are anything spectacular to use as firewood.

    pics are a rustic cabin with quaking aspen all around it and the other pic is close up of tulip leaves

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  10. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, the tulip is what we have here in NJ, there may be some Aspen, I don't know. Sorry to hear the grand old Tulip isn't good firewood, it is a magnificent tree in my eye when it is 60+ feet tall and 3' or more in diameter (none on my property, going from memory).

    And your signature post was fun to read :)
  11. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    It is all relative... better than Aspen, much better than Poplar and Cottonwood.
  12. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    There is a lot of that 'all relative' going around when it comes to firewood. Come spring when the wood piles are getting lower folks will be posting about how that punky wood dried out is actually pretty good stuff even if it is from some unknown evergreen. Sure beats being cold.
  13. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    "New to wood burning fall 2008, learning as fast as I can to recognize my mistakes earlier and earlier… grin" from signature... If you haven't burned the house down, or even set it on fire, then you're learning the important skills :)

    I came across some split/delivered HW, mostly Oak. We'll see when it is delivered. Boy it sure beats cutting and splitting my own. I just put in a couple hours this morning cutting and moving some 10" rounds from across my brook (that's all hand/back work, can't get my tractor across the brook), and boy am I tired! Then too, I'm an old guy, retired that's how I fond time to do that kind of work on this Tuesday, a work day for everybody else...enjoy.
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