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Wood Boiler for PEI

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by AndrewG, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. CMAC

    CMAC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    PEI Canada
    Hello Andrew
    This will be my 5th winter with the Harman SF360, not sure if they make it anymore. It is a size larger than the 260. Very happy with it.
    I am in MT Herbert, 8 cords per yr heats 1800 sq feet rancher on slab with in floor and detached 2 storey garage 24 x 30.
    Just picked up some Anthracite coal today...burning in the boiler as I type.
    Thanks
    Cory

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  2. AndrewPEI

    AndrewPEI New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Hi Cory,

    Harman SF260 here. Pretty pleased with it as well, heating roughly the same sq feet minus the garage. What kind of burn times do you get with the 360? I usually get 8-10 hours each load. Where did you get the coal by the way?
  3. CMAC

    CMAC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    PEI Canada
    Depends on conditions...I let it go out frequently due to slab holding heat for hrs....but 4-6hrs would be normal. Thats why i bought the coal for the cold nights. I have only burned one bag of it so far. It burns quite hot but I think my firebox is too large to take full advantage. A guy is Souris bought a trailer load of 50lb bags (12.50/bag) from Penn state.
  4. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,401
    Loc:
    Addison County, Vermont
    Seems pretty simple to me.... Dry wood is way more efficient for any woodburning appliance, and is virtually a requirement for gasifiers. If you're going to heat with wood, plan on getting at least a year ahead as soon as possible. We're two years ahead now so we just cut and stack four cords each year, replacing what we burned. If you're not able to get ahead (or buy seasoned wood), your wood burning experience will fall far short of ideal. This is true whether you use a top-of-the-line gasifier or a barrel stove.

    Gasifiers use a lot less wood to produce the same amount of heat, with virtually no smoke to annoy yourself or your neighbors. They're more expensive and have a learning curve. This site can really help with the learning curve, though. It's a fair question whether the benefits of a gasifier outweigh the cost in any individual situation, but for myself, less wood and happy neighbors makes it an easy choice.

    In order to get maximum efficiency, any wood burning appliance needs to burn hot. Idling leads to creosote and smoke. If you're burning wood, you have four broad choices:
    1. Load the sucker to the gills and let it idle if there isn't any heat demand. Less work loading and starting fires, but lots of creosote and smoke, and much higher wood consumption.
    2. Build a lot of short, hot fires, with the size and interval matched to your heat load.
    3. Allow the house temperature to make wider swings in exchange for less frequent fires.
    4. Add heat storage. Dump excess heat into storage when burning. Heat the house from storage when not burning.
    These are the only choices as I see it, whether you have a gasifier or not. OWBs use option 1. Pellet boilers modulate by in effect automatically doing option 2 to at least a limited extent.

    Since people who buy gasifiers are likely interested in maximizing efficiency, a goodly percentage go with option 4. However, adding storage will increase to convenience, comfort, and efficiency of any wood burning system. Even pellet boilers (which can modulate much better than chunk-wood boilers) still work better with storage. Some models require it.

    Like a good many things in life, there are tradeoffs. If wood is cheap and funds are limited, a wood stove operated using some blend of options 2 and 3 is a fine choice. A gasifier with storage is the other end of the spectrum. There's no single right answer and one size does not fit all.
  5. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    3,132
    Loc:
    St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.

    AndrewG. You said you have in floor heating in the slab. How is the heat going to be distributed in the second floor?
  6. andrew goodwin

    andrew goodwin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Hi There yes I would like to go and see it if possible,,i was thinking about either that model or the harmon sf260...send me a email at agoodwin@live.ca..
  7. andrew goodwin

    andrew goodwin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10
  8. andrew goodwin

    andrew goodwin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Hi Andrew How is you system working for u...im thinking about the harmon sf260 or the empire elite....would like to see your wood boiler in action if u don't mind send me a email at agoodwin@live.ca....Thanks

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