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Wood burning soooo fast

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by vixster, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. vixster

    vixster Member

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    I was told it was a hard wood the wood was delivered. At the time it was heavy. It's been drying for 1.5 years. I was told oak or maple. Now it's not so heavy. The darn wood burns so fast. In 1 to 2 hours it goes from splits to coals. Either way, if I stuff the box or do twosies. I get great heat but goes so fast. Why do you think? Is this common? I wait till box get up to 500 degrees before shutting down.. Also, should I post here or in Wood Stove forum? Thanks in advance.

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  2. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Wood loses weight when it's loses moisture.

    The coaling stage is a long part of the burn. What stove top temps do you have after 6 hrs? Or do you let it go that long before reloading?

    Also, reloading to quick causes a coal build up. Which means less wood per reload.
  3. vixster

    vixster Member

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    I don't really have coal build up. I would say after six hours, temps would be 100/250.. I know the wood is dry because it "flames on" so nicely. 500 deg I begin to shut down, in less then 20min I shut down almost all the way. Just a little bit open, just a hair. The wood seems to disintegrate so fast.
  4. jackatc1

    jackatc1 Burning Hunk

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    Oak or Maple, I would guess soft maple, yes it is considerd hard wood.
  5. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    X2. Silver Maple..

    Can you post a pic of the wood?
  6. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    "Hardwood" is typically used as a synonym for "deciduous," i.e. the tree has leaves and goes through a dormant period every year, as opposed to conifers which have needles and are green year-round, which are commonly called "softwoods." The wood from your average deciduous tree is harder than that from your average conifer, but the categories both cover a wide range of densities and there's a lot of overlap. Thus there are some "hardwoods" that are softer than some "softwoods."

    Oak is predictably hard / dense / high-BTU firewood, but some maples can be quite soft and light.
  7. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Yep hardwoods is an all inclusive definition for anything with green leaves vs needles. Some "hardwood" that start heavy end light when dry: Silver maple, willow,cottonwood, certain types of Elm, Box Elder, there are others, burn quick, low on the btu scale.
  8. onetracker

    onetracker Minister of Fire

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    i wonder if it's not basswood....

    reason i say that is cuz i got a few rounds of it mixed in with a load years ago when i used to get wood delivered. in the round i thought it was oak or something...it was seriously heavy. but...turned out to be basswood..light as a feather when it dried.
    Applesister likes this.
  9. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Sounds like soft maple to me but I'm not for sure cause I can't quite see it from here:) Got pictures;? Like the others say, the term 'hard wood' includes everything with leaves, even yellow poplar.<>
  10. WhitePine

    WhitePine Feeling the Heat

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    Nice. That shuteye emoticon just warms the cockles of my heart, since I have almost a cord of the stuff drying. And it's your State Tree, too. For shame. ;)
    Ralphie Boy likes this.
  11. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    Maybe it is the wood, but maybe you could do something differently to make the fire last longer. I get more than two hours from a load of wood even with a small stove and even when I am using lightweight woods. Try allowing less air into the stove after the wood is strongly burning. You want enough air to keep a good secondary burn going at the top of the firebox to maintain a clean and efficicent burn, but any more than that and you're sending more heat up the chimney than necessary.

    I think a topic like this one could have gone either in the Wood Shed or in the Hearth Room forum. There is a lot of overlap between the forums.
    firefighterjake and Ralphie Boy like this.
  12. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    I burnt about 3/4 of a cord earlier this season myself. I won't go more than a few short miles for it. It does season fast, burns fast, and leaves a lot of ash. I would still take it, if it was close and there wasn't a pile of oak, maple or hackberry sitting beside it. There is a lot of better shoulder season wood like silver and red maple available here without having to murder our state tree.:cool:
  13. jackatc1

    jackatc1 Burning Hunk

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    Many times basswood on first glance is mistaken for ash.
  14. WhitePine

    WhitePine Feeling the Heat

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    LOL. Mine came down in a windstorm right across one of my roads. Figured I might as well burn it since I had to cut it up anyway. Same storm dropped a black cherry right on top of the poplar. Unfortunately, the cherry was a lot smaller than the poplar.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I see no good reason to wait until the stove is to 500 degrees before dialing down the draft. This appears to be one of the big things with most folks and I do not understand it. By doing that I can see why your wood burns so fast. Start dialing down a lot sooner. You don't have to close the draft but for sure cut it to maybe 25% when the stove top gets to 250 or 300 maximum. Otherwise you are simply heating your chimney instead of keeping the heat in the stove and in the house.
    blwncrewchief likes this.
  16. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Must be good dry fire wood. That a real good thing.
    Not sure on the controls your stove has.
    Dennis has the right idea, turn it down a bit sooner.
    Dry wood won't cause any problems burned lower & slower.
  17. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Go try that in a non-cat Dennis and end up with a smokey mess of a burn. While you don't need to leave it wide open after getting to around 400 you sure need to get that firebox hot enough to support secondary combustion above the load. Just like you need the gases going up through that cat of yours to be around 500 degrees. Two different animals
  18. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    I don't think any oak feels light. Even 4 years dry.
    Like others have said, maple of some sort.
  19. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    BB's right-on. I dial back to half or a little more once I have the firebox full of rolling flame (usually @ 250-300, depends on the wood) and really start pulling it in @ 400. If the wood is dry, you should be able to keep it over 400, with good secondary combustion, by feeding it a couple splits every so often.

    If you need the long burn and won't be around to tend it, then load it up, get it up to temp (400+), close the air and fageddaboutit.

    That right there tells me it's probably not Oak. IME, shutting down at 500+ with a good load of Oak will result in a peak temp of 600+ and it will stay over 500 for quite some time until the wood is just coals and the secondaries die down.
  20. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    No problem as I've ran a non-cat stove.
  21. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Cool. Which one?
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Last one, other than our old stoves was a Heritage.
  23. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Ah OK. You had said before you looked at the Heritage but "shied away from the Hearthstone line". Didn't know you had heated with one.
  24. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I don't think any of us did!
  25. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    fwiw, it was not my stove but I helped someone out. I also showed a dealer how to run the stupid stove.... There were others too.

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